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Tweet Wednesday 22nd November 2017

How To Coach Young People For An Active Life

UK Coaching and Sport England have created a new animation to assist youth coaches in understanding and help young people positively change their sporting and physical activity behaviours.
 
Starting a new sport of physical activity or changing from inactive behaviour requires young people to go on a journey of change. Not all young people’s journeys will be easy, simple or quickly successful. Some young people will find ways to make the journey smoother and others will find the journey takes more effort and is a bumpier ride. 
 
Positive behaviour change can be achieved through coaches using a broad range of approaches that focus on young people as individuals, as part of a group or community or when they are in different environments. By using behaviour change strategies coaches can help and support young people to make better choices. 
 
Coaches can increase the likelihood of sustained positive behaviour change if they can: 

  • provide information that is easy to understand and at time when young people are likely to be responsive 
  • highlight that it is normal to take part and be active 
  • support young people to plan what to do when challenges occur 
  • help young people feel positive about the benefits of behaviours changed 
  • use simple tactics and strategies that support young people. 

Some behaviours are more resilient than others and therefore can be difficult and require a lot of effort. Changing inactive sporting or physical activity behaviours to becoming more active can be complex and therefore requires coaches and young people to keep going, persist and not to give up in developing new active behaviours and habits.
 

Find out more about the guidance and top tips for coaches in this short animation

New short animation
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Tweet Tuesday 21st November 2017

Hill End Centre has achieved British Orienteering Recognised Centre Status

British Orienteering is delighted to announce that Hill End Centre has been accredited to their Recognised Centre scheme. 

Hill End Centre has been recognised by British Orienteering the National Governing body for the sport as providing a positive first experience of orienteering to visiting groups. End Centre is one of an increasing number of recently accredited centres awarded British Orienteering Recognised Centre status.

Amanda Warwick, Programme Tutor from Hill End Centre, said: "Hill End is located only four miles from the ‘dreaming spires’ of Oxford, the peaceful, tranquil quality of our location is a world away from urban life. We offer visitors the opportunity to be closer to nature, with the space and time to explore and appreciate the wonders of the natural environment.

We are passionate about all learning and offer a wide range of unique educational opportunities for all peoples learning and development. Hill End welcomes many different groups including schools, corporate volunteering and away days, toddler groups and adult classes and workshops.

Hill End is delighted to achieve Recognised Centre Status as we believe that orienteering is an excellent medium through which we can deliver our core aims and objectives to the diverse types of groups that we deliver to."

Dan Riley, National Participation Manager for British Orienteering, said: “Our Recognised Centre scheme is designed to work with Outdoor Centres to understand how orienteering is used as a tool to deliver a wide variety of educational outcomes. We are pleased to recognise Hill End Centre as delivering a positive first experience of orienteering to visiting groups. Hill End have demonstrated themselves to be a dynamic organisation. Even before they achieved Recognised Centre Status they have taken it upon themselves to deliver Teaching Orienteering. Additionally, they have been supporting a project in the nearby Vale of White Horses to deliver orienteering to older adults. I am confident they will continue to contribute to raising the profile of orienteering within their sphere of influence.”

British Orienteering are also appreciative of the support given to Hill End by Ed Nicholas of Oxfordshire Sport and Physical Activity.

Recognised Centre Status is awarded to Outdoor Centres who can show a consistently high standard of orienteering across a range of criteria that covers orienteering delivery, staffing, resourcing as well as policies and procedures. These are examined in detail by British Orienteering advisors and accredited to outdoor centres only if they meet the standards.

British Orienteering, the National Governing Body of the sport, provide specialist advisors to help Outdoor Centres across the country to provide the highest standards in orienteering delivery.

As part of the Recognised Centre scheme, British Orienteering provides approved outdoor centres with: 

  • A Recognised Centre plaque to display at their centre which confirms that the National Governing Body of the sport of orienteering is satisfied with the standards in orienteering being delivered by the centre
  • Use of the British Orienteering Recognised Centre logo on all their correspondence
  • A high profile listing on the British Orienteering website
  • Opportunities to host British Orienteering workshops, training courses and camps
  • On-going access to a wealth of orienteering knowledge and expertise.

British Orienteering, the National Governing Body for orienteering in the United Kingdom, launched their Recognised Centre scheme in 2015. The scheme aims to raise the profile of orienteering within the outdoor industry and recognise high quality experiences being provided by centres across the country.

For more information about the scheme and how to join visit the dedicated Recognised Centre section here

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Tweet Monday 20th November 2017

A great weekend of junior orienteering!

This weekend Bristol Orienteering Klub hosted the British Schools Orienteering Championships in the Forest of Dean. 

The weekend starting on Saturday 18 November with the  British Schools Orienteering Championships Weekend at the Training Activity Centre, Russell's Enclosure / Cannop Ponds in the Forest of Dean.  

Sunday 19 November saw the British Schools Orienteering Championships 2017 take place at New Beechenhurst also in the Forest of Dean.

Supported by the British Schools Orienteering Association and attended by youngsters from all over Britain, the event started with a rather soggy training day on Saturday at Cannop Ponds and continued on Sunday with the championship race at New Beechenhurst, right next to the Sculpture and Gruffalo Trail and Go Ape Junior.

More than 450 students came to compete in forest terrain, many with parents, other family members and even their dogs in tow to support them and enjoy being in this beautiful part of the forest.  It was a very cold start, but somehow, the organisers not only managed to pull off a very  smoothly run event, they also managed to arrange for the sun to shine!

A very friendly, supportive and competitive atmosphere all centred around the assembly and run in finish line resulted in only 1 point separating the top two Large Secondary Schools. Cockermouth School won with 17 points, Ulverston Victoria High School were second with 18 points and Torquay Boys Grammar School in third with 33 points.  While Sir John Deane’s College won the Tertiary Trophy.

Hunters Bar Juniors won the Primary School Competition; Newcomer Tormead School won the Small Secondary Schools Competition convincingly whilst St Andrews School, Pangbourne won the Middle/Prep Competition 2017.

Team work
Photo credits:  John Iddles
Photo credit:  John Iddles
Photo credit:  John Iddles
Photo credit: Ray Barnes
Photo credit:  Steve Rush
Photo credit: Steve Rush

Fast and furious running by some of the most competitve juniors determined to do their best, mixed with a rather muddy final control provided some very impressive slides to the finish line! 

A very entertaining and enjoyable day for everyone who attended, and no doubt, some of the individual results will highlight some upcoming orienteering stars of the future.

Thank you to Megan Carter-Davies from the University of Bristol Orienteering Club for joining us to present the prizes.

British Schools Orienteering Association, said:  "We were delighted to see so many children thoroughly enjoying the testing courses in the Forest of Dean on such a lovely sunny day. Many thanks to all the volunteers that made this event possible. We look forward to seeing you all next year at Haigh Woodland Park in Wigan."

Thank you to all those from Bristol Orienteering Klub and British Schools Orienteering Association who volunteered their time and effort.

Photo credit:  Ray Barnes / Steve Rush
Photo credit: John Iddles

Dates for your 2018 Diary!

Saturday 13 October 2018:
British Schools Score Championships, Moors Valley Country Park, Ringwood.

Saturday 17 November 2018:
World Schools England Team selection race and training event, Tockholes, Burnley.

Sunday 18 November 2018:
British Schools Orienteering Championships, Haigh Woodland Park, Wigan.

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Tweet Monday 17th July 2017

World TrailO Championships – TrailO Relay and PreO Day 2

TrailO Relay, The Capitals Golf Club, Pipiriškes

There was controversy from the outset at the Relay day on Friday when athletes arriving in time for a 9.00 a.m. start to the competition had to wait for the best part of two hours before the competition to get under way, because the golf course owners had not allowed any placement of the flags before the day of the event.

Things got no better when first leg finishers reported several doubtful control sites and one decision point with the only two SI boxes when there were three flags at the control site.

Discontent continued as the officials and volunteers battled to complete the final TempO station within a reasonable timescale, but such were the number of complaints, followed by official protests by several countries, that the announcement of the final results and the prize giving were delayed  until Saturday to enable the hard worked jury to inspect and decide upon the six official protests.

The Jury eventually voided three out of the 27 control sites, accepting some protests, rejecting others. They also confirmed the Organisers’ decision to disqualify the Open class teams from Latvia and Poland and the Para team from Russia for infringements of the rules!

Eventually, in the Paralympic class, Ukraine was declared the winners, followed by the Czech Republic and Norway.

In the open class, the Winners were Slovenia, followed by Norway in Silver and the Czech Republic took Bronze, a second and a half ahead of the Slovak team in 4th who was a second ahead of the Finns in 5th place.

The Norwegian team’s second leg runner, Sigurd Daehli, made orienteering history. Having won World Championship medals in SkiO and FootO in previous decades, he became the first orienteer to achieve a championship medal in three separate disciplines. There is no truth in the rumour that he is in training for next year’s MTBO!

It was also notable for the rise of the central European nations and this year the eclipse of Sweden who finished 10th.

As for the British team of Tom Dobra, Charles Bromley Gardner (who was affected by illness) & John Kewley, they endured a difficult day, before eventually finishing in 14th place.

PreO Day 2,  Aukštadvaris, Lithuania

The second PreO course, held on Saturday, in a mixture of woodland and rough open terrain near the kart track at Aukštadvaris was the final day of what has been an eventful week in Lithuania. Thankfully the sun shone, the course was excellent and testing, and after the adventures of the previous day’s relay, the controls appeared to be largely in the right place and there were no protests at the end of the competition.

The British team had a very satisfactory day overall. In the Open class, Charles Bromley Gardner, still unwell but recovering, held on well to finish in 10th place, one of six competitors with 43 points and the best GBR placing in the Open class since Ian Ditchfield’s podium place in Scotland in 2012. John Kewley with a score of 41 was placed 21st and Ian Ditchfield, on 40, was placed 29th.

In the Paralympic competition, Dick Keighley finished in 23rd place.

Tom Dobra, selected for the GBR TempO & relay teams, won the Public PreO competition over the championship course with a total score of 42 points.

Several of the leading competitors after Day 1 fell by the wayside in the tricky conditions, whilst others had already made too many errors to be able to figure in the top places at the end of the day.

At the end of the two days PreO, the gold medal went to Lars Jakob Waaler of Norway with 45 points, a score also achieved by Pinja  Mäkinen who had taken a few seconds longer at the time controls. The Bronze medal went to Geir Myhr Øien, also of Norway with 44 points, a score also achieved by two former world champions Stig Gerdtman of Sweden, who was placed 4th, and Anne Straube, of Octavian Droobers, a British Orienteering member but here representing her native Germany in 5th position, her best placing for some time. To gain a podium place in this standard of competition is a tremendous performance.    

Further news reports can be found at the links below:

World Trail Orienteering Championships - PreO Round 1

World Trail Orienteering Championships 2017 - TempO

World Trail Orienteering Championships 2017

 

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