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Tweet Wednesday 11th December 2019

Children’s activity levels on the rise - Sport England Active Lives Survey

Source:  Sport England Press Release 

Children's activity levels on the rise

  • Almost half of children in England now take part in an average of 60 minutes of physical activity a day – up 3.6% from last year.
  • The rise is driven by more children getting active outside of school – 57.2% of children and young people do an average of 30 minutes or more a day outside of school, compared to 40.4% at school.
  • Significant inequalities remain in the areas of family affluence, gender and race.
Children's activity levels on the rise

This finding comes from Sport England’s ‘Active Lives Children and Young People’ report into the activity levels of the nation’s children and means that 3.3 million children are now meeting the new recommended Chief Medical Officer Guidelines - 279,600 more children than last year.

Government guidelines recommend that children and young people should get 30 minutes of their daily physical activity in the school day and 30 minutes outside of school. The figures show that there has been a rise in children getting active outside of school over the last year, with 57% (up 4.6%) doing an average of 30 minutes or more a day outside of school, compared to 40% at school.

As part of our 2016-21 strategy Towards an Active Nation, Sport England is already investing £194m in children and young people, within its remit of responsibility for sport and physical activity outside of school from the age of 5.

Activities outside of school that are on the rise include active play, team sports and walking.

At the other end of the scale, 2.1 million children and young people (29.0%) are doing less than 30 minutes of physical activity a day, and while that number is decreasing (by 3.9% over the last year) it is a reminder of how much more needs to be done. In the middle, another 1.7 million (24.2%) children are ‘fairly active’ taking part in average of 30-59 minutes a day.

The inequalities that were surfaced by the first report last year remain, with children from the most affluent families more active (54%) compared to the least affluent families (42%) while boys are more active than girls at every age from five up.

The survey also shows that active children are happier, more resilient and more trusting of others and it has also shown a positive association between being active and higher levels of mental wellbeing, individual development and community development.

Active Lives Children and Young People provides the most comprehensive overview of the sport and physical activity habits of children in England. It looks at the number of children taking part in a wide range of sport and physical activities (ranging from dance and scooting to active play and team sports) at moderate intensity, both at school and out of school. The report is based on responses from over 130,000 children aged 5-16 in England during the academic year 2018/2019, making it the largest study of its kind.

ACTIVITY SETTING – AT SCHOOL VS OUT OF SCHOOL

  • There is a difference in the amount of sport and physical activity that takes place at school, compared to activity levels outside of school – 40.4% of children are active at school for an average of 30 minutes per day while 57.2% of children are active outside of school for the same duration – an increase of 4.6% on last year.
  • At school, increases have been seen for years 3-6 (ages 7-11) - however secondary school age young people have seen no change and the youngest children (years 1-2) have seen a decrease. This is seen across boys and girls.

The report also shows that significant inequalities remain when looking at children’s activity levels:

FAMILY AFFLUENCE

  • While there have been increases in activity levels across all levels of family affluence, children and young people from families who are less affluent are still least likely to be active (42% of children in this group are active for an average of 60 minutes+ a day, compared to 54% of children and young people from families of high affluence).
  • They are also least likely to enjoy being active – 43% of children from low affluence families say they enjoy being active vs 59% from high affluent families (a 16% gap).
  • Boys from the least affluent families are more likely to be active than girls.

GENDER

  • While there have been increases in both boys and girls’ activity levels, boys are more likely to be active then girls with a gap of 319,200 between the numbers of boys who achieve the recommended amount of sport and physical activity (51% or 1.8m) and the number of girls that do (43% or 1.5m).
  • In years 9-11 (ages 13-16) there has only been an increase in activity levels for girls, and not boys, with an increase of 3.5% (29,800 number) doing an average of 60+ minutes a day.

ETHNICITY

  • Asian and black children are most likely to do less than an average of 30 minutes activity a day.

Other interesting points to note are:

AGE

  • How positively children and young people feel about sport and physical activity generally declines with age.
  • Activity levels peak when children are aged 5-7, and again at the end of primary school (age 11-12). Children are more likely to be active at these points than at any other time during their primary or secondary education. Children and young people aged 13-16 (years 9-11) are the least likely to be active.
  • There are more active children than less active children across all age groups.

TYPE OF ACTIVITY

  • Active play and informal activities remain the most common way for children in younger age groups (Years 1-6) to be active.
  • Team sports become more common as children get older. By secondary school age, team sports are the most common group of activities.

MENTAL WELLBEING BENEFITS

  • Active children and young people are more likely to report higher levels of mental wellbeing.

ATTITUDES TO SPORT AND ACTIVITY

  • The first Active Lives Children and Young People survey showed that enjoyment above all other elements of physical literacy is the biggest driver of children’s activity levels.
  • The new survey shows that girls are less likely to enjoy being active than boys with the biggest gap between the genders found around confidence and enjoyment.
  • More physically literate children are more likely to be active.
  • More physically literate children are happier, more resilient and more trusting of others.
  • The number of positive attitudes is the key driver of how active children are.

The full Active Lives Children and Young People report is available here

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Tweet Monday 9th December 2019

Graham Patten has resigned from the Board of Directors

British Orienteering announces today that Graham Patten has resigned from the Board of Directors.

Graham’s resignation is due to personal reasons and increased business commitments. Graham has resigned with regret and wishes British Orienteering and the Board all the best for the future.

Chair of the Board, Drew Vanbeck stated: "On behalf of the Board of Directors and of British Orienteering, I extend our sincere appreciation to Graham for his contribution to the sport and personally I look forward to continuing to have the benefit of Graham's wise counsel.”

Drew added, “We are in the process of searching for individuals who can fill the vacancy created by Graham’s resignation and that of Judith Holt who is due to step down from the Board at the next AGM after serving the full 9-year maximum as a director. If you are interested or know of someone who is prepared to volunteer and help British Orienteering develop and advance its strategic agenda please do not hesitate to contact me or the Chief Executive Peter Hart."

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Tweet Thursday 5th December 2019

2020 World Orienteering Day / Week - Save The Date!

The next World Orienteering Day will take place on Wednesday 13 May 2020.  

In 2020, between Wednesday 13 May and Tuesday 19 May 2020, any activity held can be registered as a World Orienteering Day event.

Vision

The International Orienteering Federation´s goals regarding the organisation of this annual event are as follows:

  • Increasing the visibility and accessibility of orienteering to young people,
  • Increasing the number of participants both in the schools’ activities, as well and in the clubs’ activities in all countries of National Federations,
  • Helping teachers to implement orienteering in a fun and educational way and and to get more new countries to take part in orienteering.

Visionary course of action

Each club of all national Orienteering Federations gets in touch with at least one school.  As teachers might need help to implement orienteering so the lessons are a fun and exciting experience, the IOF is working on providing teaching materials in different languages. 


Find out more here.

 

#worldorienteeringday

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Tweet Thursday 27th July 2017

The World Games Sprint relay: Denmark back on winning form

The first three runners from Denmark were able to stay with the pack before Maja Alm made a gap on the rest of the field in a fast and tight sprint relay race around the soggy Wroclaw Zoo. Their lead was 26 seconds over Switzerland, and Russia took third place, 40 seconds behind.

Results
1st Denmark
2nd Switzerland
3rd Russia
5th Great Britain

Great Britain finished in a very impressive 5th place only 1:20 behind the winners and 42 seconds from a podium finish! Here's what the athletes thought of the experience:

Tessa, Peter, Ralph and Megan after the Sprint Relay

Tessa Strain said:  “I was happy with my race. I know my fitness isn't as good as the best and so I just focussed on getting my controls right and was pleased to be within touching distance of the lead.”

Peter Hodkinson said:  “I think we performed well as a team and I'm happy with a strong run on my leg. I started with a small gap ahead of the main group of favourites and worked hard to gradually close this throughout the course. By the end, I had gained time on the leaders and set Ralph off with the main pack so I'm satisfied that I did the job that needed to be done. There were a lot of routes doubling back in the zoo so I was often able to see the teams ahead which really helped me to push on as I saw the runners ahead getting closer to me.”

Ralph Street said:  “I was really excited to be going out amongst some good runners, there were a lot of 50/50 decisions to start with and we stayed together as a pack. Around halfway through the zoo, I saw an opportunity to potentially gain time and this put me into the lead of the pack. From there I tried to push on and close the gap to Kyburz, unfortunately, my orienteering suffered a little bit but overall I feel I did gain time by making this tactical decision.”

Megan Carter Davies said:  “Tessa, Peter and Ralph sent me out in a great position. I knew that realistically I was not going to hold our 2nd place so there was no point worrying about it but instead have a good run for me. I did that and was happy to see that I was actually able to keep with the other girls out there. I misread the hedges after the arena passage allowing Helena to overtake but otherwise, I am really happy with how that went and am very proud of my teammates for doing such a great job today.”

Congratulations to all the athletes that have taken part in The World Games 2017. The GB team will now look ahead to World Cup Round 3 in Latvia which takes place on 25th - 27th August 2017.

The full set of reports on the World Games 2017 are available below:

The World Games 2017 continues with the Sprint Relay

Tessa Strain finished in 13th place at the World Games Middle Race

The World Games moves on to the Middle Distance tomorrow

Seventh Place for Ralph Street at the World Games

The World Games 2017

 

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