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Tweet Friday 15th December 2017

Talent squad came together for first technical training camp at Malham in the Yorkshire Dales

British Orienteering Talent Squad 2017 at Malham Technical Training Camp.

Back row – left to right:  Tom Bray, Mark Nixon, Stan Heap, Matthew Gooch, Daniel Spencer, Angus Harrington, Zac Hudd, Peter Molloy, Flurry Grierson, Alastair Thomas, Alistair Chapman, Helen Winskill

Front row – left to right: David Bunn, Lindsay Robertson, Lizzie Stansfield, Alice Wilson, Eilidh Campbell, Anika Schwarze-Chintapatla, Tara Schwarze-Chintapatla, Niamh Hunter, Evie Conway, Rona Lindsay, Heather Thomson

Photo credit: Paul Murgatroyd

Following the first planning and sport science support camp at Edinburgh in early November, last weekend saw the Talent squad come together for the first of three technical camps, held in Yorkshire and Lancashire. Based out of the Malham Tarn Field Study Centre, the first day saw some quality exercises on Ilkley Moor, focussing on the key skills of direction, distance and picture. The morning had a range of exercises on the lower slopes of the moor, working on honing compass techniques, followed by an afternoon of Norwegian map memory exercises on the higher part of the moor, where the process of simplification and the establishment of a good picture was the prime objective. The evening saw a discussion, led by Technical Coach, Mark Nixon, of the key learning points from the day and the use of 3DRerun and Quick Route as vehicles for analysis and review. Sunday saw the group drive across to the Pendle Forest Orienteers event at Tockholes, where a combination exercise using the all controls map took place. The 5.5k 'course' saw the athletes move seamlessly from part to part, with elements of corridor, window, brown only and, finally, line meant switching between the key skills and applying the lessons learned from the previous day's work at Ilkley. Finally, the squad would like to thank Airienteers and Pendle Forest Orienteers for organising access permissions to the training areas and allowing the group to come along to the public event at Tockholes for training purposes.

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Tweet Friday 15th December 2017

2017 National Rankings

Congratulations to Tessa Strain (Edinburgh University Orienteering Club) and Graham Gristwood (Forth Valley Orienteers) who are both number one in the British Rankings as at the 11 December 2017.

Women

Position 

Name

Club

Points

1

Tessa Strain

EUOC

8016

2

Megan Carter-Davies

MWOC

8003

3

Jessica Tullie

BASOC

8001

4

Alice Leake

AIRE

7951

5

Laura Robertson

ESOC

7899

6

Hollie Orr

LOC

7898

7

Catherine Taylor

SYO

7887

8

Charlotte Ward

HALO

7885

9

Fanni Gyurko

FVO

7874

10

Fiona Bunn

TVOC

7853

Tessa Strain from Edinburgh University Orienteering Club, says: It's fun to end the year top of the list after running well at the JK and British Champs this year. It will be fun to see how long I can hang on there for in 2018!”

Men

Pos.

Name

Club

Points

1

Graham Gristwood

FVO

8445

2

Alasdair McLeod

AIRE

8432

3

Kristian Jones

FVO

8404

4

Alexander Chepelin

EUOC

8377

5

Jonathan Crickmore

EUOC

8364

6

Chris Smithard

FVO

8358

7

Mark Nixon

FVO

8350

8

Peter Hodkinson

NOC

8337

9

Dane Blomquist

SYO

8324

10

Ben Mitchell

SBOC

8314

Graham Gristwood from Forth Valley Orienteers, says: “I have had a good year both domestically and internationally, and I look forward to defending my position at the top of the rankings in 2018!

Tessa Strain competing in the JK2017 Sprint race.
Graham Gristwood competing in the JK2017 on Day 2.

Photo credits:  Rob Lines.

 

Congratulations to all those who finished in the top 10 this year.

More details and the full 2017 rankings list can be found here.

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Tweet Thursday 14th December 2017

Volunteer and Club Awards 2017 - who you do you think deserves recognition?

Volunteers are at the heart of our sport – let’s take this opportunity together and join in celebrating the work of our own volunteers and their incredible contributions to orienteering in 2017!

Award Categories for 2017 are now open! Who are you going to nominate?

Club and Volunteer Awards 2017

Club of the Year Award 2017

Young Volunteer of the Year 2017

University Club of the Year 2017

Peter Palmer Coach of the Year Award 2017

SILVA Award 2017 – for a very significant contribution to orienteering

Further details and nomination forms can be found here.

The closing date for these awards is: Friday 16 February 2018

All entries are to be emailed to info@britishorienteering.org.uk

Mapping Awards 2017

  • Chichester Trophy
    For the best map by an amateur mapper
  • Silva Trophy
    For the best map produced by professional mappers
  • Walsh Trophy
    For the best urban or sprint map

These awards are for maps first used in competition during 2017. To be eligible, maps should be of new areas or significant extensions/major revisions to existing maps. Submissions should state briefly the mapper involvement.

Scoring is based on specification, cartography and presentation.

Please send electronic copies of maps, preferably either pdf or OCAD files with this nomination form to mapchair@britishorienteering.org.uk

Closing date for entries: before Friday 16 February 2018.

 

Bonington Trophy

Awarded annually for the 'best contribution to mapping' which can cover a whole range of activities related to mapping

Bonington Trophy submissions should use this nomination form to mapchair@britishorienteering.org.uk.

Closing date for entries: Friday 16 February 2018.

All awards will be presented at the British Orienteering Annual General Meeting on Friday 30 March 2018.

Further information about all of these awards is available here.

 

Read how other clubs have been nominated here.

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Tweet Tuesday 10th October 2017

British Orienteering is supporting World Mental Health Day - Today!

British Orienteering is supporting World Mental Health Day

Today!  Tuesday – 10 October 2017

1 in 4 of us will experience mental health problems this year.

Having a mate, family member or colleague in your corner can make all the difference. So, if someone you know is acting differently, step in.

British Orienteering is supporting Time to Change, a growing movement that’s changing how we all think and act about mental health.

It’s easy to dismiss mental health problems as something that only affects others. But, with 1 in 4 people experiencing mental health problems every year, it can happen to any of us – a teammate, friend, member of the family, or work colleague.

Without support from others, people with mental health problems can lose what they care about most. It’s a time when you need your mates, family and colleagues more than ever. So, if someone you know is acting differently, step in.

You don’t have to be an expert to be supportive. It can be as simple as checking in with someone, asking them how they’re doing, listening and not judging, just being there and being yourself.

You can find out more about Time to Change and their 'In Your Corner' campaign at time-to-change.org.uk. Time to Change is run by Mind and Rethink Mental Illness, and thousands of organisations like us are joining to help make change happen.

Find out more about the support available – here.

Did you know?

Orienteering is a sport that challenges both the mind and the body.

More and more people are discovering that orienteering is a fun and challenging activity that gets them exploring the great outdoors. They are gaining new skills in finding their way in unknown terrain and crossing rough and sometimes hilly ground. You are always discovering somewhere new! It's a competitive sport with something for everyone, from 10-year-olds to grandpas and grandmas.

The sport of orienteering offers many benefits, but its foremost attraction is that it is fun!

The aim is to navigate between control points marked on a unique orienteering map and decide the best route to complete the course. 

Orienteering in the outdoors

5 Health Benefits of the sport of Orienteering

1. Time outdoors is great for us physiologically:

For one it improves our Vitamin D levels. Getting a sufficient amount of vitamin D is important for normal growth and development of bones and teeth, as well as improved resistance to certain diseases. The Vitamin D Council says “your body is designed to get the vitamin D it needs by producing it when your bare skin is exposed to sunlight”.

2.   Increased time being outdoors with nature improves people’s health and happiness:

Increased time being outdoors with nature has been shown to significantly improve people’s health and happiness. The UK’s first month-long nature challenge, which took place in 2015 by the University of Derby involved people "doing something wild" every day for 30 consecutive days. It showed that children exposed to the natural showed increases in self-esteem. They also felt it taught them how to take risks, unleashed their creativity and gave them a chance to exercise, play, and discover. In some cases nature can significantly improve the symptoms of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), providing a calming influence and helping them concentrate. “Intuitively we knew that nature was good for us as humans, but the results were beyond brilliant.” said Lucy McRobert, Nature Matters Campaigns Manager for The Wildlife Trusts.

3. Increased cardiovascular capacity:

Orienteering involves walking, jogging and running, often in rough terrain. All three of these activities increase aerobic capacity and cardiovascular strength.
The Department of Health in their Start Active, Stay Active report state “regular physical activity can reduce the risk of many chronic conditions including coronary heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, cancer, obesity, mental health problems and musculoskeletal conditions.”

4. Sharpens decision-making skills:

Orienteering offers the development of individual skills in navigating while problem-solving to locate each control. Decision making is paramount: Should I go left or right? Should I climb that hill or go the long way around it? These decisions that constantly arise require thinking more than quick reactions or instinct; again, that is why orienteering is often called the thinking sport.

Research shows even one 30-minute cardio session pumps extra blood to your brain, delivering the oxygen and nutrients it needs to perform at max efficiency. Cardio also floods the brain with chemicals that enhance functions such as memory, problem-solving, and decision-making.

5. Balance between the physical and the mind:

The ultimate quest for the orienteer is to find that balance between mental and physical exertion, to know how fast they can go and still be able to interpret the terrain around them and execute their route choice successfully. 

 

Do something different on World Mental Health Day – try orienteering.

Permanent Orienteering Courses are a great way to get outside and go orienteering at a time and place that suits you.
Permanent Orienteering courses are listed here.

Interested, but want to find more about the sport of orienteering?  This set of Frequently Asked Questions will help you to find out more. 

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