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Tweet Monday 20th August 2018

Club Junior Development - South Yorkshire Orienteers

Report by Pauline Tryner (SYO) 

Several years ago, as a result of declining membership, South Yorkshire Orienteers (SYO) made the decision to focus on junior development and so our Saturday Series of monthly events was born.

The series has been hugely successful in increasing participation and year on year the numbers of participants has steadily grown. 3-4 years ago the focus switched to developing the club offer with the aim of encouraging the juniors and their parents to be active club members. This led to a huge jump in membership in the first couple of years and now membership is slowly increasing. We currently have 132 juniors which makes up approximately 42% of our membership (compared to 24% nationally).

Yvette Baker Trophy 2018

Alongside the monthly newcomer series, we offer a weekly club night and monthly coaching sessions. The newcomer events, club night and coaching sessions all have an offer for adults so that families can take part in orienteering together. We also run a monthly evening event with a social, a summer BBQ event and an annual awards lunch alongside the normal regional and national events. The Peter Palmers and Yvette Baker Trophy (YBT) are essentials on the calendar and we work very closely with the YHOA Junior Squad so as to develop our older juniors as quickly as possible.

We have learnt that getting parents orienteering means the juniors go to more events, are more likely to travel to major championship races and are more likely to volunteer at events. However, families that just want to compete locally and juniors of non-orienteering parents are still very welcome and are encouraged to participate at whatever level/frequency they want to. Orienteering is a complicated sport so we have found regular communication about the different competitions and training opportunities is very important. Also key is to keep inviting juniors and their parents to take part in specific competitions, socials and training – a personal invite often spurs the unsure into taking part.

As a club, the biggest challenge we face is getting enough volunteers to put on all the activities and events we want to provide. We do find each year that a reasonable number of new members don’t renew due to a variety of reasons. Not everything works all of the time so we try to evaluate what we are doing on a regular basis and evolve the club offering. After a long period of focusing primarily on families, we are now looking to develop membership in the 21-35 age group and over 60s.

 

Interested to read more about the new British Orienteering youth strategy "Every Junior Matters"?  Find out more here.  

Focus on Junior Development
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Tweet Thursday 16th August 2018

WMTBOC 2018 Sprint - Sunday 12th August

The shortest race of the week was awaiting the riders for the final race, with the fast and furious setting of a military base interspersed with some scrubland areas. The terrain allowed for some very fast riding, with a decent part of the course being ridden on asphalt.

The first part of the course was technically easy with very few mistakes being made and time gaps simply being down to riding speed. As the riders approached the 2nd map there were a few longer route choice legs for the men whilst the women had a lot of short legs where concentration needed to be kept high, especially around an area with a number of staircases on possible route choice. Moving onto the 2nd map a few riders were caught out by an enforced uncrossable fence before the men picked their way through the short control pick section and the women made their quickly back to the last section of the course. This final part was around the buildings of the military base which was relatively simple, but one leg caught a number of riders out where the overprint obscured some map detail although any mistakes made were minimal. The nature of the area meant any mistakes were going to be costly as the riding speed was so high, with each mistake costing riders a number of places.

The women’s race was led by Marika Hara of Finland through the early part, hitting the control pick section with a 10 second advantage over Martina Tichovska and Veronika Kubinova of Czech Republic and compatriot Haga of Finland who held a slender advantage over a number of other riders closely packed together, including Great Britain’s Clare Dallimore in 10th place. By the map exchange Hara had maintained her gap over Tichovska who had pulled away from the chasing pack by a further 10 seconds whilst Clare had moved up a few places to 7th, although a mistake straight after the map exchange lost valuable time for her. Coming through the spectator ride through Hara had been overtaken by Tichovska and Finnish rider Saarinen, with Soegaard of Denmark having moved through into 4th place with just 8 seconds separating the top 4 riders, Clare having slipped a couple of places to 9th. With riders racing flat out there was always a risk of a lapse in concentration, and Tichovska succumbed with a mistake to the last control allowing Saarinen through to take her first win at a World Champs, 9 seconds ahead of Tichovska and Soegaard who finished quickly to take joint 2nd. This gave Tichovska her 5th medal of the championships, gaining 2 golds and 3 silvers!

Ian Nixon in the Sprint (Photo by Nick Dallimore)
Clare Dallimore in the Sprint (Photo by Nick Dallimore)

In the men’s race, it was Danish rider Rasmus Soegaard who took the early lead hitting the start of the route choice section with a 4 second lead over Andreas Waldmann (Austria). Although there was little difference in the route choices, any hesitation meant valuable time loss which allowed Anton Foliforov (Russia) to take the lead after the map turnover as he flew through the map exchange, with Great Britain’s Ian Nixon in 41st after a good first part on his early start. The next part of the course needed quick decision making as the route took the riders through the maze of buildings with connecting steps, and the Czech Republic’s Vojtech Ludvik excelled in this setting taking the lead at number 19, though Foliforov was just 2 seconds back, and Nixon had maintained his position. Moving back to the final part of the course around the military base the riders came flying through the spectator area making good use of the SI Air being used for the week allowing riders to maintain speed through controls. With 4 controls in the last 500 metres riders had to keep their concentration up, and unfortunately, same issues with the map printing affected the podium results as Ludvik lost time going on the impassable straight route and having to divert his course to number 28, whilst Foliforov had taken the wider route and regained the lead. He kept a cool head through the last few controls and gained his 2nd gold medal of the week, taking the win by 12 seconds from his Russian compatriot Grigory Medvedev, with a further 2 Russian’s getting on the podium. Nixon was able to maintain his position through to the finish, although he lost time on number 28 also taking the straight route and having to change course, but still got a top 40, gaining GB’s best men’s sprint result for 5 years.

Men – 9.8km, 85m

  • Anton Foliforov, Russia 20:39
  • Grigory Medvedev, Russia 20:51
  • Krystof Bogar, Czech Republic 20:53
  • Vojtech Ludvik, Czech Republic 20:59
  • Valeriy Gluhov, Russia 21:01
  • Ruslan Gritsan, Russia 21:09
  • 40.  Ian Nixon, Great Britain 23:48

    Women – 8.4km, 50m

    1.            Henna Saarinen, Finland 20:05

    =2.          Martina Tichovska, Czech Republic 20:14

    =2.          Camilla Soegaard, Denmark 20:14

    4.            Antonia Haga, Finland 20:25

    5.            Marika Hara, Finland 20:29

    6.            Veronika Kubinova, Czech Republic 20:39

     

    10.          Clare Dallimore, Great Britain 20:56

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    Tweet Thursday 16th August 2018

    WMTBOC 2018 Long - Saturday 11th August 2018

    The course planner had opted for a mixture of short legs through the dense path network mixed with plenty of long route choice legs, with course distances reflecting the flatter nature of the terrain with the men covering 47km whilst the women tackled a 33km course.

    In the men’s race, the first control proved to be one of the most challenging with a number of riders losing several minutes to the fastest time, including Great Britain’s Ian Nixon who lost time straight out of the start but was able to pull it back to hit the first control in 47th. A long 2nd leg split the riders up with a whole host of different routes being taken although a number of riders complained that one route choice was not made obvious on the map due to the use of a smaller path symbol being used. Former World Champions Anton Folioforov (Russia) and Krystof Bogar (Czech Republic) had got a bit of a lead here and maintained this until the next long leg to number 5 where a better route choice from Bogar propelled him into the lead, whilst GB’s Nixon had moved into the top 40. By the first drinks station, Krystof Bogar from the Czech Republic had a minute advantage over Middle Distance champion Simon Braendli (Switzerland) which he was able to build on over the next few controls to the map exchange and 2nd drinks control whilst Nixon had slipped a few places to 44th. The course then went back into the dense network of paths where riders needed to be very careful they were on the right track. This proved tricky in the dark forest where some paths were hard to make out on the ground, which combined with the tiredness which was starting to set in after 75 minutes of fast riding gave some riders a few problems. Unfortunately, Nixon lost concentration in this section and missed out #18 having been riding well enough for a place in the top 40. Bogar had maintained his minute’s advantage, whilst Grigory Medvedev had got up to 3rd place as the first of 4 Russian’s in the top 8. Soon after the course planner had used another of the very small mapped tracks which a number of leading riders didn’t see, although this didn’t affect the podium results. Bogar was able to extend his lead on the fast route to the finish to regain the title he last won in 2013 winning by more than 2 minutes from Simon Braendli who gained his 2nd medal of the week.

    The women’s race started with a similarly tricky 1st control which caught out a few leading riders and by the end of the long 2nd leg Martina Tichovska (Czech Republic) had a minute lead over Camilla Soegaard (Denmark). However, a mistake by the Czech rider at the next control allowed the Dane to take over the lead and by the end of the next long leg at number 6 she had a 1:40 lead over Svetlana Poverina (Russia), whilst Great Britain’s Clare Dallimore had moved up to 11th after a mistake at the 1st control. By the 1st drinks control Soegaard was still leading but Tichovska had made up some of her lost time and was only 30 seconds back, whilst Gabriele Andrasiuniene (Lithuania) was up into 3rd. After a couple more long legs the 2 leaders advantage was dramatically cut as both made mistakes on number 13. The women then had a leg using the small mapped track which had caused problems on the men’s course but this impacted the top places as Soegaard saw the route whilst Tichovska didn’t which regained the lead which had been changing places between these 2 throughout the race. Unfortunately for the Danish rider, a huge error exiting number 18 on an unmapped track lost her the lead as she dropped out of the top 10. Tichovska regained the lead but lost it with another mistake at the 20th control which Antonia Haga (Finland) was able to capitalise on by taking the lead having been making her way closer to the lead throughout the race. However, there was more drama towards the end as having just made her way into the lead a poor route choice from Haga allowed Tichovska to retake the lead to 22 which she held onto to get back the title she had won in 2015, winning by the narrowest of margins of just 5 seconds from Haga who secured her first individual medal at a World Champs. Long-time leader Soegaard pulled back up to 9th place but will rue the 8 minutes she lost at 18 finishing only 7 minutes behind the leaders. GB’s Dallimore had pulled up to a top 10, but took the same route choice as Haga to number 22 and dropped to 13th, still a great result in tough conditions.

    Men – 46.5km, 765m

    • Krystof Bogar, Czech Republic 1:56:13
    • Simon Braendli, Switzerland 1:58:20
    • Anton Foliforov, Russia 1:59:31
    • Jussi Laurila, Finland 2:01:16
    • Valeriy Gluhov, Russia 2:01:27
    • Vojtech Ludvik, Czech Republic 2:02:04

    DSQ Ian Nixon, Great Britain

    Women – 37.1km, 670m

    • Martina Tichovska, Czech Republic 2:01:14
    • Antonia Haga, Finland 2:01:19
    • Svetlana Poverina, Russia 2:05:11
    • Algirda Mickuviene, Lithuania 2:06:33
    • Gabriele Andrasiuniene, Lithuania 2:06:54
    • Veronika Kubinova, Czech Republic 2:07:00

    13. Clare Dallimore, Great Britain 2:10:27

    The women’s race started with a similarly tricky 1st control which caught out a few leading riders and by the end of the long 2nd leg Martina Tichovska (Czech Republic) had a minute lead over Camilla Soegaard (Denmark). However, a mistake by the Czech rider at the next control allowed the Dane to take over the lead and by the end of the next long leg at number 6 she had a 1:40 lead over Svetlana Poverina (Russia), whilst Great Britain’s Clare Dallimore had moved up to 11th after a mistake at the 1st control. By the 1st drinks control Soegaard was still leading but Tichovska had made up some of her lost time and was only 30 seconds back, whilst Gabriele Andrasiuniene (Lithuania) was up into 3rd. After a couple more long legs the 2 leaders advantage was dramatically cut as both made mistakes on number 13. The women then had a leg using the small mapped track which had caused problems on the men’s course but this impacted the top places as Soegaard saw the route whilst Tichovska didn’t which regained the lead which had been changing places between these 2 throughout the race. Unfortunately for the Danish rider, a huge error exiting number 18 on an unmapped track lost her the lead as she dropped out of the top 10. Tichovska regained the lead but lost it with another mistake at the 20th control which Antonia Haga (Finland) was able to capitalise on by taking the lead having been making her way closer to the lead throughout the race. However, there was more drama towards the end as having just made her way into the lead a poor route choice from Haga allowed Tichovska to retake the lead to 22 which she held onto to get back the title she had won in 2015, winning by the narrowest of margins of just 5 seconds from Haga who secured her first individual medal at a World Champs. Long-time leader Soegaard pulled back up to 9th place but will rue the 8 minutes she lost at 18 finishing only 7 minutes behind the leaders. GB’s Dallimore had pulled up to a top 10, but took the same route choice as Haga to number 22 and dropped to 13th, still a great result in tough conditions.

    Men – 46.5km, 765m

    • Krystof Bogar, Czech Republic 1:56:13
    • Simon Braendli, Switzerland 1:58:20
    • Anton Foliforov, Russia 1:59:31
    • Jussi Laurila, Finland 2:01:16
    • Valeriy Gluhov, Russia 2:01:27
    • Vojtech Ludvik, Czech Republic 2:02:04

    DSQ Ian Nixon, Great Britain

    Women – 37.1km, 670m

    • Martina Tichovska, Czech Republic 2:01:14
    • Antonia Haga, Finland 2:01:19
    • Svetlana Poverina, Russia 2:05:11
    • Algirda Mickuviene, Lithuania 2:06:33
    • Gabriele Andrasiuniene, Lithuania 2:06:54
    • Veronika Kubinova, Czech Republic 2:07:00

    13. Clare Dallimore, Great Britain 2:10:27

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    Tweet Monday 13th November 2017

    British Schools Orienteering Championships 2017 this Sunday!

    Saturday 18 November 2017 TRAINING Event: 
    Cannop Ponds, Forest of Dean, Gloucestershire.

    Sunday 19 November 2017 CHAMPIONSHIPS: 
    New Beechenhurst (South-West), Forest of Dean, Gloucestershire. 

    Organised by  Bristol Orienteering Klub and supported by the British Schools Orienteering Association.

    Now in its 31st year, we see the British Schools Orienteering Championships return to New Beechenhurst for the first time since 2002 next weekend. With over 90 schools and over 450 competitors taking part, it will be an exciting weekend of racing to see which schools take the trophies.  With school start times spread across the morning, it's unlikely we will know who the winners are until the last runners are in.

    British Schools Orienteering Championships 2017

    New Beechenhurst is typical Forest of Dean terrain with a network of paths, some steep slopes, ditches and streams. The area will require the children to use their navigation skills while running around this lovely forest. With the Autumn leaves on the trees and ground the area looks lovely.

    Event Organiser Richard Rossington of Bristol Orienteering Klub, said:  "Bristol Orienteering Klub are really looking forward to showing off the Forest of Dean to young orienteers from across Britain.  Carol Iddles has worked hard to plan challenging and enjoyable courses for all levels on what we expect to be a great day - and hope to be a fine one! Peter Maliphant's Saturday training courses will be excellent preparation, in similar terrain very close by at Cannop. See you at the weekend!"

    British Schools Orienteering Association, said:  "British Schools Orienteering Association are delighted to see so many children from across the whole country taking part in this year's British Schools Orienteering Championships.  We hope the children all have a fantastic weekend and the weather is good.  On behalf of British Schools Orienteering Association, a huge thank you to Bristol Orienteering Klub and their volunteers for taking on this event and putting on the training event the day before.  Good luck everyone!"

    Final Details can be found - here.

    Officials for the Saturday Training Event: 
    Planner: Pete Maliphant (Bristol Orienteering Klub)
    Organiser:  Pete Maliphant (Bristol Orienteering Klub) with Richard Rossington (Bristol Orienteering Klub)
    Safety Officer:  Richard Rossington (Bristol Orienteering Klub).

    Officials for the Sunday British Schools Orienteering Championships: 
    Planner:  Carol Iddles (Bristol Orienteering Klub)
    Organiser:  Richard Rossington (Bristol Orienteering Klub) 
    Controller:  John Fallows (North Gloucestershire Orienteering Club) 
    Safety Officer: Mike Forrest (Bristol Orienteering Klub). 

    British Orienteering would like to take this opportunity to thank all volunteers from Bristol Orienteering Klub and other clubs for spending their time putting on this event and ensuring that this is a great weekend of orienteering event for all to enjoy.  Best wishes to all who are travelling to compete at this year's British Schools Orienteering Championships Final and training event this weekend. Fingers crossed for sunny weather!

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