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Tweet Tuesday 22nd January 2019

Julie Cleary (LOK) successfully finishes Orienteering Control Challenge!

Julie Cleary (LOK) finished her Orienteering Control Challenge in aid of the Tavistock Trust for Aphasia on the 18th November.

Julie finished her challenge with a final push by doing three races in one weekend which included a night orienteering event, and two other races including a yellow course with newcomers on the Sunday.

The challenge took place over one month at the end of last year and involved visiting 120 orienteering controls – 1 for every month in the 10 years since her stroke.

Julie at the start of her challenge
The last control at the end of her challenge

Photos kindly supplied by LOK

Julie says: “Aphasia is an inability to comprehend or formulate language due to damage in the brain. Often caused by strokes but head trauma and progressive neurological disorders (eg MND and dementia) can worsen the condition. Imagine not being able to tell your doctor how you feel? Or being incapable of saying please or thank you - that was my life for about 2 months before I began to teach my brain to communicate again. 

Orienteering is often called "the thought sport", and a therapist speculated that my recovery was greatly aided as all my life my brain has been trained to figure out routes around things - like a lake or damaged neurons!”

Over the course of the challenge, Julie ran 58.5 km and found 137 control flags. Total raised (with gift aid) is £3,575.00.

Julie comments: "A couple of the weekends were rainy and cold. That takes a toll on my physical reserves as my brain seems to want more energy to keep me warm. Running in the woods or on moorland in the wet without slipping requires a huge effort from me - I just don't like falling at all! However, it was all worth it in the end. The challenge raised awareness of Aphasia and generosity of donations will help the Trust with people who have not been so lucky as me. Thank you so much."

Further details about the challenge and photos can be found here: https://mydonate.bt.com/fundraisers/juliecleary

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Tweet Monday 21st January 2019

UK Orienteering League 2018 Results – Individual Results are in!

The Individual (Men and Women) Winners of Each Age Class are:

M/W Men Club Points  Women Club Points

16

Joe Hudd

WCOC

526

Scarlet Heap

SO

531

18

Alastair Thomas

WCOC

493

Ellie Bales

POTOC

484

20

Alex Carcas

EUOC

328

Chloe Potter

BOK

489

21

Ben Mitchell

SBOC

465

Anya Crocker

SOC

491

35

Duncan Grassie

SLOW

416

Tereza Maria Rush

BOK

547

40

Francis Shillitoe

NATO

483

Anne Straube

OD

544

45

Laurence Townley

SN

540

Emma Harrison

EPOC

534

50

Martin Ward

SYO

535

Ruth Ker

CLARO

516

55

Clive Hallett

BOK

548

Vicky Thornton

MDOC

506

60

John Embrey

DEE

533

Jackie Hallett

BOK

544

65

Steve Whitehead

EBOR

541

Christine Kiddier

BL

549

70

Peter Gorvett

SYO

547

Liz Godfree

DVO

542

75

Tom Edelsten

GO

547

Ruth Rhodes

SO

547

80

John Thompson

TVOC

528

Jenny Thompson

TVOC

546

85

Donald Moir

LEI

550

Eileen Bedwell

CLOK

300

The Top 10 positions across All Individual Age Classes are:

Pos.

Name

Age class

Club

Total score

1

Donald Moir

M85

LEI

550

2

Christine Kiddier

W65

BL

549

3

Clive Hallett

M55

BOK

548

4

Tom Edelsten

M75

GO

547

4

Tereza Maria Rush

W35

BOK

547

4

Peter Gorvett

M70

SYO

547

4

Quentin Harding

M55

CLARO

547

4

Ruth Rhodes

W75

SO

547

9

Jenny Thompson

W80

TVOC

546

10

Alison Sloman

W80

HOC

545

Full results of the 2018 UK Orienteering League can be found here.

British Orienteering would like to take this opportunity to congratulate all the above individual winners.  

Individual Results - 2018 UKOL
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Tweet Sunday 20th January 2019

January Talent Squad Weekend

This weekend members of the GB Talent Squad continue their preparation for the 2019 season by attending the squad camp in the Surrey Hills.  On Friday evening 19 athletes met up at the Juniper Hill centre, in the shadows of Box Hill, to build on the base from previous camps and their winter training. 

The weekend is set up to further develop individual skills, to give time for detailed personal discussions with coaches and medical staff, and to familiarise themselves with terrain similar to that of their selection races at the JK. 

On Friday evening they were able to review the experiences and lessons from the pre- Christmas Lake District camp and set themselves up for the exercises of the weekend. 

They spent Saturday at Winterfold with sessions focusing on route choice and map memory.  

In the morning they were faced with a pairs route choice exercise in which each chose a different route and then saw who arrived at the control first. Given the terrain, this was often a choice of straight or around to avoid climb and contours or, as they soon found out, some patches of quite difficult and potentially slow forest.  

Following a change to dry clothes and some lunch they then had a separate pairs exercise that tested map memory over some complex and variable legs. Again, straight or longer path and attack point choices were on offer. 

During both sessions, the pairs were shadowed for part of their runs by one of the five volunteer coaches. 

This meant that as well as their GPS tracking the squad athletes were able to review and analyse not just where they went but how they tackled to challenges of the legs. 

Sprint Training on Sunday

Showered and refreshed the athletes then had to opportunity to individually review their day, their activities and also their current and planned training programmes with one of the coaches. They were also able to discuss any injury or remedial exercises and general conditioning with trained medical and physiotherapy staff. 

Today, Sunday, they will travel to the University of Sussex for some sprint training. 

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Tweet Thursday 8th February 2018

Elite Athlete Winter Training Series - Interview #4: with Alasdair McLeod

Winter Training and Motivation: Athlete Focus

The temperature is cold, and the days are shorter. Struggling to maintain the motivation for training or orienteering regularly? You're not alone. Getting yourself out on cold dark mornings and evenings takes a lot more motivation than it might do in July.

Pick up some tips and see what makes up a typical training week for some of our top elite athletes this winter with our elite athlete focus feature series.

Athlete name:  Alasdair McLeod

Athletes club:  Airienteers

Athletes age:  27

Athlete's biggest achievement?

Some World Orienteering Championships top 30's and 6th at TioMila.

Typical training week over winter (including mileage, terrains, etc)?

Try to run each day for an hour. Try to run in terrain. Try to do two intense things each week and try to do one long more than 2 hours run each week.

Alasdair McLeod competing 

Technical training over the winter?

A few night league races and the odd technical training weekend. I start more technical training after February.

Top 3 tips for staying motivated in winter?

  • Have some short-term goals that allow you to stay motivated
  • Remember good stuff from previous seasons to keep you inspired and remind you why you enjoy the sport
  • Don’t let setbacks bring you down. Winter training will never go exactly to plan.

Thank you, Alasdair.  British Orienteering and members would like to take this opportunity to wish you all the very best with your training throughout the rest of the year.

 

Read more

Elite Athlete Winter Training Series of Interviews
More information - here.

Interview #1: with Charlotte Ward - here
Humberside and Lincolnshire Orienteers, Sheffield University Orienteering Club

Interview #2: with Kris Jones - here
Forth Valley Orienteers, Swansea Bay Orienteering Club, Lillomarka OL, Swansea Harriers, Dundee Hawkhill Harriers

Interview #3: with Alice Leake - here
Airienteers

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