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Tweet Wednesday 16th January 2019

Why not try your hand at orienteering with Forestry Commission England?

Why not try your hand at orienteering with Forestry Commission England in the nation’s forests this winter to test your navigation skills around the woods. The aim is for everyone is to move between control points marked on an orienteering map. If you are a little more competitive the challenge is to complete the course in the quickest time.

Children will love the Gruffalo Orienteering course available at 14 Forestry Commission sites across England. A fun, navigational challenge using a simple map to find 12 Gruffalo markers hidden in the deep, dark wood. Children can choose to run or walk the course through the woodlands and can time themselves against the clock if they want to increase the challenge.

Find your nearest course here.

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Tweet Tuesday 15th January 2019

An Introduction to Orienteering presented by Graham Gristwood

South London Orienteering Club (SLOW) has produced a video to help inform and guide beginners on what to expect at their first orienteering race. The film, which covers the orienteering map, courses, controls, equipment and what to wear, will be released at 5 pm on South London Orienteers' YouTube channel at 5 pm on 9th January. Graham's video

The film starts with an example of an orienteering map showing what the different colours and symbols mean, and then goes on to explain how courses are represented and examples of what might be on offer. The next section shows what orienteers mean by 'controls' with map inserts relating to features in the forest and then there is some information on equipment and kit so anyone can be ready to start a race.

SLOW were delighted that Graham Gristwood agreed to host the video as his enthusiasm and expertise add greatly to the presentation. The filming took place in Barr Wood near Stirling with the woods looking very tempting bathed in winter sunshine.

The film ends with Graham linking to the series of Skills Videos (also on South London's Youtube Channel) so that once beginners have the guide they can easily see explanations of techniques to help them improve.

South London Orienteers hope that clubs and affiliated groups will use this video to promote the sport to new participants and increase awareness of our sport.

For more information, please contact South London Orienteers, Sarah Brown: sarah@slow.org.uk

Graham Gristwood
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Tweet Monday 14th January 2019

British Orienteering Annual Awards 2018 – Nominations Now Open!

There are thousands of people who are committed to the development and delivery of orienteering within the UK each year. British Orienteering is looking for nominees for our 2018 awards and wants to recognise and reward some of the great work being done across the sport of orienteering by our clubs, coaches, mappers and volunteers of all ages.

Who do you think deserves recognition for their hard work, dedication and effort they have given tirelessly to our sport throughout 2018? British Orienteering would like to recognise the dedication and achievement of the many outstanding individuals within the sport.

We are delighted to announce that we are now actively accepting nominations for British Orienteering National Annual Awards. This year we have introduced a new category – Volunteer of the Year Award. This is an exciting new development! The Volunteer of the Year Award recognises one outstanding adult volunteer for their valuable time and commitment they have given over the year. This is in addition to the Young Volunteer Award which recognises commitment from those under the age of 25. We are delighted to introduce this new category into British Orienteering Annual Awards for 2018. Who do you think deserves to be recognised and nominated for this new award? Details of all the Volunteer, Club and Mapping Awards are outlined here, together with the criteria and nomination process for each Award. 

2018 Club, Coach and Volunteer Awards

Each year British Orienteering presents a number of awards to recognise the incredible effort and impact delivered by clubs, coaches and volunteers across orienteering.
 

2018 Award Categories Open for Nominations are as follows:

Club of the Year Award

Is your club an important part of the local community?

  • Providing opportunities for everyone to experience high-quality activities at all levels of your sport or recreation?

  • Demonstrating a commitment to the development of participants as well as coaches and volunteers?

  • Taking an innovative approach to the promotion of the club?

Club of the Year Nomination Form – can be found here.



University Club of the Year Award

This award recognises the efforts of University Clubs in the development of participants as well as coaches and volunteers. The award is also to show appreciation for the University introducing and providing a gateway to the sport to their students.

University Club of the Year Nomination Form – can be found here.


 

Coach of the Year Award

Coach of the Year award is looking for coaches who demonstrate success in one or more of the following areas:

  • engaging new people in orienteering
  • improving the performance of orienteers
  • mentoring and developing other coaches

Coach of the Year Nomination Form – can be found here.



Young Volunteer of the Year Award

This award is for a volunteer, under the age of 25, who has demonstrated a commitment to supporting delivery of orienteering activity with passion, energy and enthusiasm.

Young Volunteer of the Year Nomination Form – here.



Volunteer of the Year Award - new category!

This award is for a volunteer who has demonstrated a commitment to supporting delivery of orienteering activity with passion, energy and enthusiasm.

Volunteer of the Year Nomination Form – can be found here.


 

SILVA Award

- a person or persons who have made a very significant contribution to orienteering over a period of years, with an emphasis on ‘field' activities rather than committee work.

In 1983 SILVA (Sweden) AB decided to mark the fiftieth anniversary of the first Silva compass by establishing an annual award within each IOF member Federation. The awards were to enable Federations to honour those who have contributed in a special way to the development of orienteering. With the assistance of SILVA (UK) Ltd this was interpreted, within the UK, as being a person or persons who have made a very significant contribution to orienteering over a period of years, with an emphasis on ‘field' activities rather than committee work. Indeed, nominees may not be active or retiring members of the British Orienteering Board, nor part- or full-time employees of the Federation.

All members can nominate someone they believe has made a significant contribution to orienteering through ‘field’ activities.

SILVA Award Nomination Form – can be found here.


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2018 Mapping Awards

To encourage the production of high-quality maps the Map Group, on behalf of British Orienteering, awards a number of trophies to encourage high standards of mapping and related activities.

All nominations for the Mapping Awards below should be made by Sunday 24th February 2019 and winners will be presented with their awards at the 2019 AGM.

Terry Smith, Chair of the Mapping Group, said: “We continue to be impressed with the high standard of maps submitted for the Mapping Awards. We particularly look forward to receiving nominations from, or on behalf of, new mappers and those who have not previously submitted entries.”

2018 Mapping Award Categories Open for Nominations are as follows: 

Chichester Trophy

The Chichester Trophy was donated by the Honorary President of the British Orienteering Federation in 1971, Sir Francis Chichester. The Trophy consists of the binnacle compass used on Sir Francis' 'round the world' yacht, Gipsy Moth V, mounted on a wooden plinth. The Trophy was first awarded in 1971 to Robin Harvey and Sue Bone for their map of Leith Hill. It was originally awarded for the Best Map produced in a single year, though later it was awarded for multiple maps or contribution to mapping. In 1985, with the introduction of the 'Bonington Trophy', the 'Chichester Trophy' reverted to the original concept of the best map produced by an amateur mapper.

Mapping Award Nomination Form – can be found here.



SILVA Trophy for Professional Maps

With the high standard of professionally surveyed and drawn orienteering maps being produced in Britain, the British Orienteering Map Group decided, in 1992, that a new trophy should be awarded in recognition of these mapping companies. The Map Group annually awards the 'Silva Trophy' to the best professionally produced map. This trophy, sponsored by SILVA U.K. Ltd. is made from Stourbridge crystal. This irregular shape, called cullet in the trade, is formed when the unused crystal cools. The base was made by Mike Baggott of Harlequins from English elm and the solid silver plate was purchased from a bullion supplier in Birmingham’s Jewellery Quarter and engraved nearby.

Mapping Award Nomination Form – can be found here.


 

Walsh Trophy

This trophy was made by Mike Baggott of HOC and is sponsored by Walsh Shoes. The trophy is made of old walnut with a triangular cross-section and an etched plate with an image of Canary Wharf, London. It is awarded annually to the best urban or sprint map drawn to ISSOM specification.

Mapping Award Nomination Form – can be found here.


Bonington Trophy

This trophy was donated to British Orienteering by its Honorary President, Sir Chris Bonington, the world-famous mountaineer. The trophy consists of a piece of rock collected from the summit of Mount Everest on Chris' 1985 expedition, mounted on a wooden plinth. It is awarded annually for the 'best contribution to mapping' which can cover a whole range of activities related to mapping.

Bonington Trophy Nomination Form – can be found here.

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Who are you going to nominate?

To find out more about the awards and how to nominate, click here.

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Tweet Wednesday 14th February 2018

Elite Athlete Winter Training Series - Interview #7: with Graham Gristwood

Winter Training and Motivation: Athlete Focus

The temperature is cold, and the days are shorter. Struggling to maintain the motivation for training or orienteering regularly? You're not alone. Getting yourself out on cold dark mornings and evenings takes a lot more motivation than it might do in July.

Pick up some tips and see what makes up a typical training week for some of our top elite athletes this winter with our elite athlete focus feature series.

Athlete name:  Graham Gristwood

Athletes club:  Forth Valley Orienteers

Athletes age: M34

Graham Gristwood (left) out training

Athletes biggest achievement?

World Orienteering Championships Relay Gold 2008

More recently, World Cup 8th place Grindelwald 2017.

Typical training week over winter (including mileage, terrains, etc)?

Monday – easy running

Tuesday – hill session and recovery on spinning bike

Wednesday – Night orienteering

Thursday – easy running and intervals on golf course

Friday – easy running/spinning

Saturday – hills or orienteering

Sunday – long run (preferably in the hills, but sometimes forest roads)

As much training off road as possible, and in terrain at least once or twice per week. Also hot yoga 2-3 times per week (new this winter) for strength/flexibility/recovery.

Technical training over the winter

At least once per week all winter – usually night orienteering, preferably twice. Also some very intense training camps and weekends with SEDS / Kalevan Rasti.

Top 3 tips for staying motivated in winter.

I enjoy my training, so it is almost never a problem to get out and do it.

I also like to think about the big competitions that I want to do well in during 2018, and I think about staying on top of the domestic races for another year!

Athletes favourite motivational quote.

"Go hard or go home" (Jon Duncan) is a good one.

 

Thank you, Graham.  British Orienteering and members would like to take this opportunity to wish you all the very best with your training throughout the rest of the year.

 

Read more

Elite Athlete Winter Training Series of Interviews
More information - here.

Interview #1: with Charlotte Ward - here
Humberside and Lincolnshire Orienteers, Sheffield University Orienteering Club

Interview #2: with Kris Jones - here
Forth Valley Orienteers, Swansea Bay Orienteering Club, Lillomarka OL, Swansea Harriers, Dundee Hawkhill Harriers

Interview #3: with Alice Leake - here
Airienteers

Interview #4: with Alasdair McLeod - here
Airienteers

Interview #5: with Jenny Ricketts - here
Edinburgh University Orienteering Club, Mar Orienteering club

Interview #6: with Hector Haines - here
IFK Lidingö SOK

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