News

News

Latest news

Tweet Monday 18th March 2019

Calling All English Orienteering Clubs!

FINAL CALL FOR APPLICATIONS

2019 is British Orienteering’s 'Year of the Volunteer' – Club Match Funding Applications are still open for a few more days only!  Don't delay in getting your application in as the deadline is fast approaching...this Friday 22 March 2019. 

British Orienteering is pleased to announce that the application process for clubs in England to apply for match funding to support their own volunteer project is open.

In support of British Orienteering’s 'Year of the Volunteer', clubs in England can apply to match their own investment in a volunteer project up to £250. For example, a club project that costs £500 can be split with £250 coming from the club and £250 from British Orienteering. Alternatively, the project may cost over £500 but the maximum that can be applied for from British Orienteering is still £250.

Clubs need to complete the application form outlining which category the funding would be used for and how the club intends to develop/ increase the number of volunteers as a result of it. The funding available is on a match funding basis and the club is expected to match or exceed the funding available from British Orienteering.

Projects can be big or small and cover many different areas including club nights, events, juniors, coaching and recruitment to name a few. To get involved, all clubs need to do is think of a project and download and complete the application form from www.britishorienteering.org.uk/matchfunding.

We are looking for clubs to try new and innovative ideas to get more people involved in volunteering for orienteering. The only required results are that the project must show an increase of members within the club volunteering and how this will be sustained in the future.

With the benefit of Sport England funding, we can match a club’s own investment up to the value of £250. Unfortunately, this offer is for English based clubs only as the funding is being provided by Sport England. However, we’ll be providing project ideas and news stories from across the network of clubs on the British Orienteering website which will be available for anyone to access.

Don't delay....if you haven't done so already, get your application downloaded and apply today.
www.britishorienteering.org.uk/matchfunding

Closing date for all applications is this Friday 22 March 2019.

#volunteering4orienteering

Top
Tweet Monday 18th March 2019

Coaching Newcomers Live Webinar

Do you want to hear more about a club initiative in coaching newcomers to your club? If the answer is yes, join us for our next live webinar on Thursday 28th March at 7pm.

Titled Coaching newcomers, this session shares DVO's experience of running parks series and introducing new families and individuals to Orienteering. Delivered by Sal Chaffey she’ll be discussing what needs to be in place at the first event and how you might develop this to encourage newcomers into mainstream orienteering and club activities.

The session is for everyone who is looking, regardless of your experience as a coach, to support the club at coaching sessions and/ or events. Whether you’re new to this area or have been leading on this before, it’ll be great to hear your views and opinions throughout the evening.

To view the session all you need to do is follow the simple registration process prior by following the link below;

Coaching newcomers

We’ve one more live session in this block of webinars on Thursday 25th April, but if you’ve missed out on any of the other sessions, log into the repeats which will be shown as advertised below;

Date

Live or Repeat

Registration link

Tuesday 26th March

Repeat

Planning Focus – from 28th February

Tuesday 9th April

Repeat

Communication social media v traditional methods – from 14th March

Thursday 25th April

Live

Attracting and retaining juniors

 

For further information about how you could get involved and to keep an eye out for all future sessions or find links to session you may have missed (including the 2018 pilot), visit the British Orienteering webinar webpage.

Top
Tweet Friday 15th March 2019

World Orienteering Week - just now two months to go!

15th - 21st May 2019

How are you planning to get involved in World Orienteering Week? 

World Orienteering Week is approaching! If you haven't planned an orienteering activity yet there is still plenty of time to get involved. 

Together let's get Great Britain on the world map and help in making this the best World Orienteering Week ever!

The International Orienteering Federation's (IOF’s) Vision for World Orienteering Day
Increasing the visibility and accessibility of orienteering to young people, increasing the number of participants both in the schools’ activities, as well and in the clubs’ activities in all countries of National Federations, helping teachers to implement orienteering in a fun and educational way and to get more new countries to take part in orienteering. 

All schools, all orienteering clubs and all countries all over the world are encouraged to participate in World Orienteering Day. We hope you are all considering how to implement a fun activity in your school, in your club, in your village, in your city or in your country. 

What event are you planning?  FREE Resources available.
There are many inspirational event ideas and free promotional resources to download available here.

Register your Event or Activity
Don't forget to register your event on the world map here.  

For more information email Project Leader:  goran.andersson.rf@gmail.com

www.worldorienteeringday.org.uk

Top
Tweet Friday 9th March 2018

Badaguish Talent Squad Pre-Season Camp: Training Diary by Alice Wilson (Clydeside Orienteers)

Training Camp Diary by Alice Wilson

Club: Clydeside Orienteers

Age Class: W16

Badaguish British Orienteering Talent Squad Pre-Season Camp. 

The focus of this final training camp before the racing the season begins was to put together the orienteering techniques that we had worked on in detail during our previous weekend camps and practice them under race conditions.

Day 1:

On the first day, we were based at Inshriach. The first exercise was practice for running the first Leg of a Relay, so we all started in a mass start and, like in a Relay, we had different gaffles.

In the afternoon we moved to a different part of Inshriach where the contours are much more complex. There, once again like in a race, we were all given different start times and it was our responsibility to be fully warmed-up and to get there on time. This exercise itself was a Middle distance course and was all about orienteering like you would do on race day.

At British Orienteering Talent Squad training camps the evening review session is just as important as the physical training itself. We normally upload our GPS traces onto websites that allow us to put our routes directly onto the orienteering map so we can see exactly where we went. 

Alice Wilson (Clydeside Orienteers)

Mark Nixon Talent Squad’s Technical Coach usually gives a presentation debriefing us about the day’s training. Also, depending on what phase of training we are in, Mark talks about the orienteering technique we were practising, and if we have made a mistake, we can look at the Leg and identify where and why the mistake happened.

Day 2:

In the morning of the second day, we went into Aviemore for a Sprint exercise. Once again, like on race day, we were issued start times. As always in Sprint Orienteering this course forced us to focus on route choice. This was really interesting as later when we reviewed the session in the evening, we measured the lengths of the different routes we had chosen, taking into account turning sharp corners or zigzagging in and out of buildings, and could work out what the best routes were.

After lunch we did exercises at Loch Vaa with a combination of longer and shorter Legs, practising for Long races. This was helpful as it gave me a better understanding of how many decision points I needed to safely get me to the control, and how that can differ in an area of vague or complex contours. Also, it helped me to understand when marshes and open areas are useful to navigate by - just in case you’re wondering in Loch Vaa they are.

Day 3:

We drove up to the Moravian coast, and in the morning attended a local Moravian event at Darnaway East, where they had especially planned male and female Middle distance courses for us. This was great as we could use this event, even though it was small, as practice for what it would be like at a bigger event, in the sense that there would be more distractions – such as more people in the forest not on your course – and proper SI punching. Distractions in the forest are something that everyone struggles with on some level, so using a real event was good practice for coping with this.

Afterwards, we headed to Culbin for more Relay practice, except that this time we did it as if we were heading out on the final Leg; meaning there were staggered starts and once again different gaffles.

Day 4:

For our final exercise, we went to Uath Lochans and did a Long distance course. This was a good exercise to finish with as it gave you a good idea of how your navigation had improved in the last four days.

 

Overall, the training camp was great fun, and I think it was especially helpful that over the four days I was able to practice all of the different disciplines of orienteering:  Long, Middle, Relay and Sprint. Also, this camp taught me to properly analyse my routes and choices after racing, which is a skill I will be able to put to good use whenever I go orienteering in the future.

 

Thank you, Alice, for providing this insightful account of your time at camp.  British Orienteering would like to take this opportunity to wish you and all the members of the Talent Squad all the very best with your training and preparations for the 2018 season.

 

Read Angus Harrington's Badaguish Talent Squad Pre-Season Camp: Training Diary here

Top