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Tweet Monday 21st October 2019

Scotland take the win at Junior Home Internationals 2019 held in N. Ireland

Junior teams from Scotland, England, Wales and Ireland travelled last weekend to the Mourne Mountains in County Down for the annual Ward Junior Home International competition.  The individual race was held on Saturday at Cassy Water and the Relay the following day at Donard Forest near Newcastle.  

The individual races started in lovely sunny weather on open moorland, with rough tussocks and heavy going.  Some tricky controls in the forest then required athletes to switch technique, with many runners losing time in the lower visibility terrain.  The final downhill section came out onto the moor again, providing a long, fast run for home.  

Results after day one showed Scotland just one point ahead of England, and Ireland three points ahead of Wales for third place.   Everyone had a fine time during an evening ceilidh in Newcastle.  

The Relay was another wet October day!   Donard Forest was steep with felling and windblown areas, so tricky for head-to-head racing.  After some tense early legs and following a very close sprint finish, the girls points were all square, so we all waited for the M18s on the last leg to emerge from the forest.

Relay 
Scotland take the win - congratulations!

The first three teams from Scotland all came in together, therefore winning the relays and the competition overall by 9 points.  This was a repeat of their win in 2018. 

Unfortunately, Wales were only able to field one team in the Girls Relay, and Ireland finished in a comfortable third place overall.

Many congratulations to all the teams and many thanks to Northern Ireland Orienteering for hosting an excellent event. 

Detailed results can be found here.  

Photos by:  Will Heap Photography. 

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British Orienteering would like to thank all junior teams and their supporters for travelling to take part in this event.  A big thank you to Northern Ireland Orienteering for organising and hosting this event.  Congratulations to Scotland on their win again this year. 

Next years event will take place in Southern England on the 10 and 11 October 2020.

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Tweet Sunday 20th October 2019

China, last stop of the 2019 Orienteering World Cup

Report by International Orienteering Federation.

Five things you may not know. 


After the third round of the Orienteering World Cup in Switzerland, it is time to focus on the Final Round, which is always an exciting event as the winners of the season are finally decided and goals for next year start to appear.

However, this time there’s another thrilling point: the World Cup is visiting China from 26th to 29th October. Guangdong Province will host the first IOF Major Event with global participants, as well as the first World Cup organised in the country. With three races: a , Middle distance, a  Sprint Relay and the final Sprint, China wants to ensure a weekend of top level competition while promoting our sport among its population.

Here there are a few interesting facts you may not know about the Orienteering World Cup Final Round and Chinese Orienteering:

1.  Middle distance terrain: a tough mix of park and forest!

The first race of the three is the Middle Distance, a race which will be determined in unusual terrain. Not a typical European Middle Distance terrain for sure, the venue is a mix of forest and park, but this will still be a tough challenge for the athletes.

2.  Did you know about these historical China’s national team results at WOC?

Even though Chinese athletes are not now among the favourites to win a medal, some historical results must be highlighted regarding their performance at Major Events: at WOC 2008 the women’s team achieved the 7th place in the Relay, and in 2009, Shuangyan Hao took a 10th place in the women’s Sprint race. Recent results indicate that the Chinese team is moving up again and it will be interesting to see if they can provide some surprises on home ground.

3.  The World Cup visits another continent!

Since the World Cup 2015 Round 1 in Australia, all World Cup Rounds have been celebrated in Europe, so this is the first time in 4 years it is visiting a different continent! However, Major Events will soon return to Asia, as Japan is organizing the World Masters Orienteering Championships 2021. Asia now also has a regular schedule of Asian Championships and the number of World Ranking Events is steadily growing.

4.  Orienteering promotion in China is not only about this World Cup!

In 2017, IOF President, Leho Haldna, and CEO, Tom Hollowell visited China to ensure the World Cup Final Round 2019 and reach an agreement for a long-term plan to develop orienteering in the most populated country of the world. Helping to improve the level of their top orienteers, working to build a strong base and bringing more Major Events to the country are the pillars to promote orienteering in China.

5.  Chinese Time Zone, don’t miss out on the competitions!

When following an international event, it is essential to know what the local time  is to avoid missing the fight for the medals. Therefore, China’s time zone is UTC+8 (in the whole country!) The weekend of the World Cup is especially challenging since Europe goes from Summer to Normal time at 04:00 in the night between 26 and 27 October.  

PLEASE REMEMBER: THE CLOCKS CHANGE ON THE NIGHT OF SATURDAY 26 OCTOBER 2019 AT MID-NIGHT IN THE UK.

Get set to watch the Web-TV Broadcasts

As usually, IOF Live Services will be available to follow the last stop of World Cup. On LIVE Orienteering, we will find start lists, the TV broadcast from the Opening Ceremony and all the races, GPS tracking… and anything you may need to be informed!

The Programme for Competition is as follows:

Opening Ceremony

25 October (Friday)
13:00-15:00 (CEST, UTC +2)
19:00-21:00 (China)
Free

Middle

26 October (Saturday)
08:00-11:00 (CEST UTC +2)
14:00-17:00 (China)
Ticket needed

Sprint Relay

27 October (Sunday)
07:30-09:00 (CET UTC +1)
15:30-17:00 (China)
Ticket needed

Rest Day

28 October (Monday)

Sprint

29 October (Tuesday)
07:00-09:30 (CET UTC +1))
15:00-17:30 (China)
Ticket needed

 

Wishing the GB team all the very best in their final preparations as they get ready to travel to compete.

 

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Tweet Saturday 19th October 2019

TrailO Bukowa Cup, Poland PreO and TempO

Ten GBR based trail orienteers travelled to Sczcecin in NW Poland for the Bukowa Cup in both the WRE in TrailO and also a FootO competition, including two new faces, making a satisfactory debut in the International TrailO scene, Andrew Stemp and David Jukes.

In the TrailO, the best GB performers were Charles Bromley Gardner (BAOC), 3rd in the PreO, 6th in TempO & Tom Dobra (BOK) 8th in TempO, 10th in PreO.

Not all the group also ran in the FootO competition, but some of those who did achieved remarkable success, with Ruth Rhodes winning W75, Ian Ditchfield M60, Charles Bromley Gardner M55, Andrew Stemp and Tom Dobra coming 3rd and 4th respectively in M21 and David Jukes winning the M65 Sprint race.

This concludes the series of European TrailO Cup and TrailO World Ranking Events for 2019 and we now await the fixture list for the 2020 season.

Full results can be found here

Ten GBR Trail Orienteers travelled to compete in Poland 
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Tweet Monday 14th May 2018

The Bowes Museum Permanent Orienteering Course by Colin Butler (SUFFOC)

Source:  THE PUNCH.  Suffolk Orienteering Club's Members Magazine

The Bowes Museum Permanent Orienteering Course article by Colin Butler (Suffolk Orienteering Club)

"Recently we visited Barnard Castle a market town in Teesdale, County Durham for a family golden wedding party on a Saturday.  We visited Bowes Museum the next day to occupy ourselves, and nephews and families had returned home, before going for a quiet meal in the evening. There was a special exhibition about tulips, and we had to go all around the galleries and display cases with a question paper to find a wide variety of tulip features.

As we went to the reception desk to collect our prize for a fully correct result, we noticed a pile of orienteering maps at the end of the counter. It is a doddle course, but we spent another pleasant half hour finding the controls around the gardens and shrubbery. 

Surrounding scenery

I left the course map with my brother-in-law as a reminder to take his grandchildren orienteering on their next visit. The Bowes course is listed via the British Orienteering and Cleveland websites.  

On Monday we went for a super walk upstream in the autumn sunshine along the River Tees, and back along an old railway line. It’s a lovely area if you like rambling.

If you would like to explore any of the Permanent Orienteering Courses then details can be found on the British Orienteering website."

Permanent Orienteering courses are fixed orienteering routes where you simply download a map and just go!   There are orienteering routes across the country, and this is a great way of exploring local areas when away on holiday or taking a short break in the UK.

More information on permanent orienteering courses can be found here

Thank you to Colin and Suffolk Orienteering Club for giving British Orienteering permission to publish this article. 

If you, your family or your club have any similar stories which you would like to share with other members then please get in touch. Email:  jtaylor@britishorienteering.org.uk

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