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Tweet Monday 21st October 2019

Scotland take the win at Junior Home Internationals 2019 held in N. Ireland

Junior teams from Scotland, England, Wales and Ireland travelled last weekend to the Mourne Mountains in County Down for the annual Ward Junior Home International competition.  The individual race was held on Saturday at Cassy Water and the Relay the following day at Donard Forest near Newcastle.  

The individual races started in lovely sunny weather on open moorland, with rough tussocks and heavy going.  Some tricky controls in the forest then required athletes to switch technique, with many runners losing time in the lower visibility terrain.  The final downhill section came out onto the moor again, providing a long, fast run for home.  

Results after day one showed Scotland just one point ahead of England, and Ireland three points ahead of Wales for third place.   Everyone had a fine time during an evening ceilidh in Newcastle.  

The Relay was another wet October day!   Donard Forest was steep with felling and windblown areas, so tricky for head-to-head racing.  After some tense early legs and following a very close sprint finish, the girls points were all square, so we all waited for the M18s on the last leg to emerge from the forest.

Relay 
Scotland take the win - congratulations!

The first three teams from Scotland all came in together, therefore winning the relays and the competition overall by 9 points.  This was a repeat of their win in 2018. 

Unfortunately, Wales were only able to field one team in the Girls Relay, and Ireland finished in a comfortable third place overall.

Many congratulations to all the teams and many thanks to Northern Ireland Orienteering for hosting an excellent event. 

Detailed results can be found here.  

Photos by:  Will Heap Photography. 

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British Orienteering would like to thank all junior teams and their supporters for travelling to take part in this event.  A big thank you to Northern Ireland Orienteering for organising and hosting this event.  Congratulations to Scotland on their win again this year. 

Next years event will take place in Southern England on the 10 and 11 October 2020.

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Tweet Sunday 20th October 2019

China, last stop of the 2019 Orienteering World Cup

Report by International Orienteering Federation.

Five things you may not know. 


After the third round of the Orienteering World Cup in Switzerland, it is time to focus on the Final Round, which is always an exciting event as the winners of the season are finally decided and goals for next year start to appear.

However, this time there’s another thrilling point: the World Cup is visiting China from 26th to 29th October. Guangdong Province will host the first IOF Major Event with global participants, as well as the first World Cup organised in the country. With three races: a , Middle distance, a  Sprint Relay and the final Sprint, China wants to ensure a weekend of top level competition while promoting our sport among its population.

Here there are a few interesting facts you may not know about the Orienteering World Cup Final Round and Chinese Orienteering:

1.  Middle distance terrain: a tough mix of park and forest!

The first race of the three is the Middle Distance, a race which will be determined in unusual terrain. Not a typical European Middle Distance terrain for sure, the venue is a mix of forest and park, but this will still be a tough challenge for the athletes.

2.  Did you know about these historical China’s national team results at WOC?

Even though Chinese athletes are not now among the favourites to win a medal, some historical results must be highlighted regarding their performance at Major Events: at WOC 2008 the women’s team achieved the 7th place in the Relay, and in 2009, Shuangyan Hao took a 10th place in the women’s Sprint race. Recent results indicate that the Chinese team is moving up again and it will be interesting to see if they can provide some surprises on home ground.

3.  The World Cup visits another continent!

Since the World Cup 2015 Round 1 in Australia, all World Cup Rounds have been celebrated in Europe, so this is the first time in 4 years it is visiting a different continent! However, Major Events will soon return to Asia, as Japan is organizing the World Masters Orienteering Championships 2021. Asia now also has a regular schedule of Asian Championships and the number of World Ranking Events is steadily growing.

4.  Orienteering promotion in China is not only about this World Cup!

In 2017, IOF President, Leho Haldna, and CEO, Tom Hollowell visited China to ensure the World Cup Final Round 2019 and reach an agreement for a long-term plan to develop orienteering in the most populated country of the world. Helping to improve the level of their top orienteers, working to build a strong base and bringing more Major Events to the country are the pillars to promote orienteering in China.

5.  Chinese Time Zone, don’t miss out on the competitions!

When following an international event, it is essential to know what the local time  is to avoid missing the fight for the medals. Therefore, China’s time zone is UTC+8 (in the whole country!) The weekend of the World Cup is especially challenging since Europe goes from Summer to Normal time at 04:00 in the night between 26 and 27 October.  

PLEASE REMEMBER: THE CLOCKS CHANGE ON THE NIGHT OF SATURDAY 26 OCTOBER 2019 AT MID-NIGHT IN THE UK.

Get set to watch the Web-TV Broadcasts

As usually, IOF Live Services will be available to follow the last stop of World Cup. On LIVE Orienteering, we will find start lists, the TV broadcast from the Opening Ceremony and all the races, GPS tracking… and anything you may need to be informed!

The Programme for Competition is as follows:

Opening Ceremony

25 October (Friday)
13:00-15:00 (CEST, UTC +2)
19:00-21:00 (China)
Free

Middle

26 October (Saturday)
08:00-11:00 (CEST UTC +2)
14:00-17:00 (China)
Ticket needed

Sprint Relay

27 October (Sunday)
07:30-09:00 (CET UTC +1)
15:30-17:00 (China)
Ticket needed

Rest Day

28 October (Monday)

Sprint

29 October (Tuesday)
07:00-09:30 (CET UTC +1))
15:00-17:30 (China)
Ticket needed

 

Wishing the GB team all the very best in their final preparations as they get ready to travel to compete.

 

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Tweet Saturday 19th October 2019

TrailO Bukowa Cup, Poland PreO and TempO

Ten GBR based trail orienteers travelled to Sczcecin in NW Poland for the Bukowa Cup in both the WRE in TrailO and also a FootO competition, including two new faces, making a satisfactory debut in the International TrailO scene, Andrew Stemp and David Jukes.

In the TrailO, the best GB performers were Charles Bromley Gardner (BAOC), 3rd in the PreO, 6th in TempO & Tom Dobra (BOK) 8th in TempO, 10th in PreO.

Not all the group also ran in the FootO competition, but some of those who did achieved remarkable success, with Ruth Rhodes winning W75, Ian Ditchfield M60, Charles Bromley Gardner M55, Andrew Stemp and Tom Dobra coming 3rd and 4th respectively in M21 and David Jukes winning the M65 Sprint race.

This concludes the series of European TrailO Cup and TrailO World Ranking Events for 2019 and we now await the fixture list for the 2020 season.

Full results can be found here

Ten GBR Trail Orienteers travelled to compete in Poland 
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Tweet Monday 14th May 2018

Switzerland and Norway European Champions in relay

It was back to Tesserete for the Men’s and Women’s Relays, the penultimate races of this years European Championships.

The forests which would meet the competitors were open and fast beech woods, with little in the way of vegetation to impede the runnability. This meant that the runners would have to cope with an extremely high running pace throughout the race, which would mean the risk of over running and making a mistake was extremely high.

The Women’s relay kicked off proceeding, with Jess Tullie of GBR1 (supported by Cat Taylor and Hollie Orr) and Jo Shepherd for GBR2 (followed by Charlotte Watson and Alice Leake) leading off for the Brits. The pace was high right from the start, with Switzerland’s Judith Wyder for their first team taking the lead and never relinquishing it. Behind, the chasers could only scramble for positions in the pack, with the Fins and Swedes leading the charge, but Jess and Jo well placed.

Onto the second Leg and the Swiss first teams lead began to come under pressure from one of their own runners. The second team runner Simone Aebersold slowly began to close down on her teammate Elena Roos, catching her by the second TV split at the “Tower of Spirits”, before turning what had begun as a 30-second deficit into a minutes lead by the changeover. Behind a chasing pack of Russia, Sweden and Finland had formed but could do nothing to impact on the pace of Aebersold. Cat Taylor for GBR1 was slowly moving through the places from 14th and would change over in 8th place just ahead of Ida Bobach of Denmark, sending out Hollie Orr and Maja Alm together, 3 and a half minutes down on the lead.

Sarina Jenzer of SUI2 would feel the pressure from behind almost immediately, with her teammate Julia Gross slicing her lead in half by the first radio. To the TV control at the “Tower of Spirits”, it was Sui1 ahead of the chasers, with SUI2 falling back but still holding onto second and Sweden’s Karolin Olsson closing the gap to the lead. Olsson would soon create a gap to her fellow chasers, but not enough to make any major inroads into the lead of Gross until she made a mistake on the third to last control. This allowed Denmark’s Alm, who had been running the quickest out of everyone in the forest and had bridged the minute or so gap to the chasing pack back into the hunt for the silver medal. Both women entered the finishing straight together, but it was Sweden who would have the better sprint finish and take the silver, with Denmark settling for bronze. Sadly, Alm’s relentless pace was too much for Orr, who would bring the team home in a commendable 7th place.

Onto the men’s race, and with the favourable terrain, the race was wide open for a fantastic British result. Kris Jones would start first for GBR1 (followed by Peter Hodkinson and Ralph Street) with Hector Haines - making his debut this week - running for GBR2 (supported by Sasha Chepelin and Ali McLeod). The pace from the start was ferocious, with the Swiss teams wanting to romp away with another gold and the Swedish (who have had a sub-par championships for their men’s team) looking to put their championships back on track.

There was much changing in the lead throughout the first Leg, but Kris remained in the top-three throughout, even breaking away with Florian Howald of Switzerland 2 at the arena passage, before they were closed down; but Kris didn’t falter, coming in in the lead of a quartet of runners.

It was a lead, but a small one. Peter Hodkinson was under pressure in a pack which included several world champions, including Matthias Kyburz, Fabian Hertner and Magne Daehli. Peter kept his cool, did his own navigation and by the time of the long, ungaffled leg back to the arena he was in the pack and holding on. Sadly the elastic snapped after the arena passage and Pete would lose a minute from an additional small mistake but had done a fantastic job at keeping GBR in touch for a bronze.

Out on last Leg and Ralph Street was being hunted down by some of the best last leg runners in the world. A couple of small errors at the start of the Leg meant that Ralph was on the back foot, with Czech, France and Russia hunting him down. It was France who would sneak ahead, with Fredric Tranchand breaking away from the chase and clear into bronze. Small mistakes from all the runners would creep into their runs, with Ralph entering the long Leg back to the arena in fourth place. By the run through though the Czechs have snuck ahead and by the finish, it was as precious, with Ralph finishing in 5th, just behind Vojtech Kral of Czech in 4th.

Results EOC Relay

Women:

1) Switzerland 1 1:45:56
Judith Wyder
Elena Roos
Julia Gross

2) Sweden 1 +2:11
Lina Strand
Sara Hagstrom
Karolin Ohlsson

3) Denmark 1 +2:13
Cecilie Friberg Klysner
Ida Bobach
Maja Alm

Men:

1) Norway 1 1:55:40
Eskil Kinneberg
Mahne Daehli
Olav Lundanes

2) Switzerland 1 +0:30
Florian Howald
Matthias Kyburz
Daniel Hubmann

3) France 1 +3:07
Nicolas Rio
Lucas Basset
Frederic Tranchand

 

Official results EOC women

Official results EOC men

Official results (full)

eoc2018.ch

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