News

News

Latest news

Tweet Monday 17th June 2019

World Orienteering Day 2019 – Snapshot of Orienteering Activity in the UK Continued...

Dartford Orienteering Klubb

Dartford Orienteering Klub held a number of events with 105 adults and 990 children orienteering.  

15 May 2019 Hackney:  365 participants, event held by David LeFevre.
16 May 2019 Marlborough School:  277 participants, event held by Neil Speers.
20 May 2019 Urswick School, Hackney:  138 partipants, event held by David LeFevre.
21 May 2019 Bexley Primary:  234 partipants, event held by Allison Page.
21 May 2019 Bexley Park Race:  81 partipants, event held by Andrew Evans

Totally 1,095 participants comprising of 105 Adults and 990 children. 

Photo credits: Dartford Orienteering Klub

South Yorkshire Orienteers

South Yorkshire Orienteers celebrated World Orienteering Day with a lovely sunny evening event on Wednesday 15th May. 176 people enjoyed the stunning views across Sheffield from Bole Hills and The Rivelin valley. There were 6 different courses, all expertly planned by the Lightfoot family, catering to the wide range of participants on the night including toddlers, brownies, schools children, super vets, students, runners and experienced club members. After the event, many club members adjourned to the local pub to enjoy a special World Orienteering Day Menu!

South Yorkshire Orienteers 
Special WOD 2019 menu

Mar Orienteering Club

"It was a busy World Orienteering Week in Maroc Land in northeast Scotland, with five different activities on offer on various days, organised and run by a range of different groups.

First off, the club held one of their Forest Sprint events at Deeside Activity Park and Dess woods to celebrate World Orienteering Day itself, on a gloriously sunny Wednesday evening. There was a good turn out of 41 runners and the kind weather encouraged everyone to linger and socialise.
On Thursday it was the turn of the 18 pupils in class P4-7 at Braemar school to try orienteering in their playground, with courses which had been planned and set up by class teacher Mrs Wood. Braemar school enjoyed participating in orienteering as part of the 2016-18 Cairngorm Leader COPE project and it is fantastic to see a legacy of the development work continuing in this way.

Later in the day, 13 enthusiastic members of the Aboyne cluster after-school club tackled some special WOW themed courses in Castle Woods. The biggest challenge of the session proved to be trying to solve the puzzle of the WOW link!

On Friday, orienteering was one of the activities on offer at Mearns Academy as part of their festival of sport. The Academy recently commissioned an orienteering map of their grounds and this was one of the first opportunities to try it out. With instruction from club member Andy Oliver, six S3 girls enjoyed the new experience and challenge.

Finally, on Tuesday it was the turn of Upper Deeside schools to get together for a festival in the woods adjacent to Crathie school. The festival was organised by the local Active Schools Co-ordinators with course planning and support from Maroc members. 31 pupils from four small schools- Tarland, Logie Coldstone, Strathdon and Crathie - all had a great time finding their way around the most scenic extended playground in the UK. There were some really impressive scores recorded, again demonstrating legacy from development work undertaken through the COPE project.

All in all a successful World Orienteering Week which offered a taster of the sport to a wide range of different people."

World Orienteering Day at Braemar
Aboyne
Aboyne map

Potteries Orienteering Club

Potteries Orienteering Club held 3 activities in Central Forest Park to mark World Orienteering Week.

We held 3 activities over three days based on our permanent orienteering course.  This is our latest permanent orienteering course and was designed with easier controls only.

DAY 1: Wednesday 15 May. 
We ran a SCORE course which was intended to cater for the Urban Activities regulars.  10 extra controls were added using the bright numbered stickers on lamp posts, as per the Urban Activities.

  • 10 members took part on this course.
  • Peter Munn and 3 of his outdoor group members tackled the basic course.
  • 9  Girl Guides  + 4 adults went on specific courses designed by Marian.
  • Mark Clews and Jonathan Whilock visited all 26 in about 33 mins.... Lil Bales  - all in about 43 min. Everyone else returned in the allotted 45 mins.

The next 2 days catered for groups and non-orienteers.

DAY 2:  Thursday 16 May.
It was clear from the lack of bookings that no one was expected on this day. However, I still felt I needed to be prepared, but no one came. I  hold the record for the planner of an event with the lowest attendance ...2 at Forest Park about 20 years ago. Can I claim to have beaten this with an Activity?

DAY 3:  Friday 17 May. 
A contrast. 42 Brownies or Guides + 12 adults turned up to tackle Marian's special courses.   

Day 3, along with the Guide groups on Day 1, used the permanent orienteering course posts in a series of short loops in order to spread out the participants.

-----

Army Orienteering Association

As part of WOD 2019, the Army Orienteering Association (AOA) hosted the Army Inter Unit Team Championships at Longmoor, Hampshire, over the period 15-16 May 19. The Championships were organised by the Royal Army Physical Training Corps (RAPTC) and the Army Air Corps (AAC).

Day 1 was based on four Spanish Score courses (Long, Medium and 2 x Short variants). There were 5 categories: Open, Masters, Women’s, Under 25 and Guests. Dependent on the category entered, teams comprised of four or three competitors. Team times from 1 rolled forward to Day 2.

Day 2 used the Team Harris format with a long variant for teams of four and a short variant for teams of three. Times from Day 2 were added to times from Day 1 to determine overall category winners.

In total, 182 participants took part over the 2-day event.

We even introduced a new discipline....moo-rienteering!

How did you, your club or school take part in World Orienteering Day & Week?

Email:  jtaylor@britishorienteering.org.uk and be included in the next snapshot to celebrate our sport globally!

Top
Tweet Sunday 16th June 2019

Highlighting our Volunteer and Mapping Awards Winners Again!

British Orienteering has supported Volunteer's Week (1 - 7 June 2019), and as it closes let's celebrate our Volunteer and Club Awards Winners again!

Celebrating and thanking again all this year's Volunteer and Club Award Winners

Young Volunteer of the Year 2018 

Winner:  Holly Stodgell of Walton Chasers 

Holly has started up an after-school orienteering club at her school and is leading the training sessions, providing motivation to the group and setting the training schedule. She has coordinated a group of adults to take on the coaching and getting the group from nothing to light green/green standard is a huge achievement. 

It is great to see the next generation of volunteers so committed to the sport.

Young Volunteer of the Year
Volunteer of the Year

Volunteer of the Year 2018 

As part of our Year of the Volunteer, we launched this new award to recognise those volunteers committed to orienteering.  

Winner:  Alan Honey of Bristol Orienteering Klub 

In 2018 Alan has been Chairman of Bristol Orienteering Klub (BOK), organised the British Sprint Championships at Bath University, initiated the successful Track to Terrain project, started a training course for new coaches and volunteered numerous club events and activities. Alan put huge amounts of personal time and effort into these projects and, together with the team he leads has been responsible for BOK’s continuing successes. 

The commitment shown by all volunteers to the sport is a fantastic example of some of the work going on to deliver and develop orienteering across the UK. Congratulations to Alan Honey who this year is announced as Volunteer of the Year 2018.   

University Club of the Year 2018 

University Club of the Year 2018 

Winner:  Loughborough University Orienteering Club is University Club of the Year 2018. 

After the club was revived in 2014 following a long period of being dormant, LUOC has gradually increased membership, participation orienteering activities at the university to become one of the UK’s most active student orienteering clubs. The club has a busy training schedule with sessions on most weekday evenings and regular competition on weekends with much support for local club events from LEI, DVO, NOC and OD. Regular coaching for beginners means many have progressed to competiting on m/w21 elite courses. The club works closely with the University to support volunteers in a range of training provision for coaches and volunteers.  

It is fantastic to see such strong University Clubs and we can only hope that we see more University Clubs developing this strength in the future. 

Club of the Year 2018 

Winner:  South Yorkshire Orienteers is Club of the Year 2018. 

South Yorkshire Orienteers 

In 2018 SYO has continued to grow and develop through offering a wide-ranging program of events, club nights, socials and monthly coaching sessions. Club Nights are a recent addition initially funded by Sport England they are now self-sustaining with 60-70 participants per week during term time. The clubs Volunteer Coordinator ensures that the club's program is well supported and run regular training opportunities for members. In 2018 the club introduced a point scheme similar to parkrun where participants and volunteers get points towards a club t-shirt for their participation. SYO have strong links with community organisations across Sheffield and this has led to a diverse participant and member demographic.  

Peter Palmer Coach of the Year 2018 

Winner:  Jason Falconer of Wessex Orienteering  

Jason is Head Coach of Wessex Orienteering and regularly delivers the Tuesday evening club training for all members. In addition, Jason works closely with Active Dorset to promote Orienteering, delivering a series of coached sessions over 6 weeks (half a term) to groups of Key Stage 2 children. The sessions progress through all skills of the sport and include a competition finale using S.I. kit; often off-site on one of WSX permanent courses. In Autumn of 2018 Jason worked closely with Beat the Street to link families in the Poole area to the club. 

SILVA Award 

SILVA Award winner 2018 is John Warren (Wimborne Orienteers).

John has been an active member of Wimborne Orienteers since 1976 and in the years following has been involved in all aspects of orienteering. John took on the assistant organiser role for the JK in 1979 just 3 years after starting in the sport and didn’t look back organising, planning and controlling events at all levels over the past 42 years including organising the World Orienteering Championships Relays at Avielochan in 1999. Yet John has a particular passion in working with newcomers, helping introduce them to the sport and he is always on hand to offer skills advice and encouragement. He works closely with the local council to deliver Activate events and acting as lead coach for club activities on permanent courses he helped map, plan and install.

To quote John: ‘
‘Volunteering’ hasn’t been so much of an effort, it has mostly been a real sense of satisfaction and I hope that in a small way has contributed to a lot of people having enjoyable experiences taking part in the sport that we love." 

British Orienteering would like to again take this opportunity to say a massive 'THANK YOU' to all this year's award winners as well as to everyone who makes orienteering happen across the country every week.  

Top
Tweet Sunday 16th June 2019

Scotland Orienteering Association - Celebrated Volunteer's Week: 1- 9 June

With Volunteers’ Week taking place from 1-7 June 2019, the Scottish Orienteering Association celebrated many of the volunteers on their website who help make orienteering in Scotland great.

Highlighting just two of their volunteers within their individual clubs saying thank you to their volunteers. 

Inverness Orienteering Club starting off the week...

  • Celebrating Volunteers – Day 1 (Saturday 1 June 2019):  Inverness Orienteering Club  
    Highlighting volunteers from Inverness Orienteering Club - read volunteer profiles with Dave Summer and Jenny Hall here.
  • Celebrating Volunteers – Day 2 (Sunday 2 June 2019):  Moravian Orienteers 
    Highlighting volunteers from Moravian Orienteers - read volunteer profiles with  Ian Welsh and Rosie Pye here.
  • Celebrating Volunteers - Day 3 (Monday 3 June 2019): Mar Orienteering Club
    Highlighting volunteers from Mar Orienteering Club - read volunteer profiles with Pat Graham and Fran Getliff here.
  • Celebrating Volunteers – Day 4  (Tuesday 4 June 2019): East Lothian Orienteers
    Highlighting volunteers from East Lothian Orienteers - read volunteer profiles of Michael Atkinson and Jamie Wilson here.
  • Celebrating Volunteers – Day 5 (Wednesday 5 June 2019):  Solway Orienteers
    Highlighting volunteers from Solway Orienteers - read volunteer profiles of Stuart Graham and Dave McQuillen here.
  • Celebrating Volunteers – Day 6  (Thursday 6 June 2019):  Edinburgh Southern Orienteering Club
    Highlighting volunteers from Edinburgh Southern Orienteering Club - read volunteer profiles of Judy Bell and Ewart Scott here.
  • Celebrating Volunteers – Day 7 - Part 1 (Friday 7 June 2019):  Edinburgh University Orienteering Club
    Highlighting volunteers from Edinburgh University Orienteering Club - read volunteer profiles of Ali Masson and Laura King - here.
  • Celebrating Volunteers – Day 7 Part 2  (Friday 7 June 2019):  Grampian Orienteers
    Highlighting volunteers from Grampian Orienteers - read volunteer profiles of Rachel Scott and Bob Daly - here.

British Orienteering would like to take this opportunity to say thank you to all the volunteers who have been highlighted over the last week!   

Across the country, there is such a lot of support given to our sport by so many volunteers often a lot of their work is behind the scenes and in the background.  British Orienteering would like to take this opportunity to say a huge thank you to everyone who gives their time to support our sport across the UK - you are the lifeblood of the sport.  THANK YOU!

Top
Tweet Saturday 4th August 2018

World Orienteering Championships Sprint

Kicking off the 35th World Orienteering Championships in Riga, Latvia was the Sprint Distance event.

Beginning in the morning in Kronvalda Park in the centre of Riga it was a flat, fast and relatively straightforward course to get the athletes underway. Without any major technical challenges, competitors would have to be pinpoint precise to ensure they qualified in necessary top-15 positions, with some big names missing out. In the Ladies race – who started first at 7 am UK time – the GBR women of Charlotte Ward, Alice Leake and Megan Carter-Davies all qualified without any issues, Megan best of the day for the Brits in 3rd. In the Men’s race the story was similar, with Peter Hodkinson initially a worry for missing out, he, Chris Smithard and Kristian Jones all qualified for the final. It was not so lucky for the defending silver medallist in the Men’s discipline, Frenchman Frederic Tranchand, who missed out by just 4 seconds in 17th place. There were a series of mispunches, particularly in Heat C, caused by two similar controls in close proximity, though with no protests upheld, the results stood. In the Women’s field, the only major shock exit was the mispunch of Sabine Hauswith of Switzerland, who would have been challenging for the podium on a good day.

Onto the Final, and the Women again got proceedings underway. The Final offered a far more complex navigational challenge to the runners, with extensive artificial barriers and alleyways opened specifically for the event; yet with no height gain on the course, the running speeds would dictate proceedings just as much. The main issue though would turn out to be the spectators and cars out in the streets. With the organisers not shutting down the roads for the runners, there were continual issues of cars and buses attempting to drive into the tightly-packed arena. This was only exacerbated by the overlapping routes taken by runners leaving the arena for their start, entering the arena to head through the arena passage, and finishing runners. Add to this the chaos caused by the crowded streets, and the public not paying attention to the runners as they were competing (there were numerous instances of athletes colliding with members of the public), it was havoc on the courses.

Charlotte Ward began things for the British Women, and after a slow start, she began to get into her running. As the course opened up towards the end she used her running strength well, but it was just a bit too much to do to fight back into the top twenty at the end of the day. After finishing 4th, she slowly dropped to 24th, two minutes down.

The next GBR Woman was Alice Leake, and again it was a slow start for Alice, but as they entered the tricky middle section of alleyways and barriers, she began to fly. From 19th at the 5th control, she would gain time on her rivals for the top-10 all the way to the finish. Starting just a minute in front of Tove Alexanderson, there would always be a lot of pressure, but Alice had no problems. Alexanderson would best Alice’s leading time by 50 seconds to take the lead at the finish, but Alice would hold on for 8th. The final GBR Woman out into the city was Megan Carter-Davies. Megan started quicker than both Alice and Charlotte but came unstuck exiting the difficult middle section. She tried to gain the lost time back as the legs opened up from short technical navigation into more open, wide route choices, but more mistakes cropped in. Still, it was an admirable performance, and for the youngest member of the team a great sign of things to come, with a 28th here.

Many would try to better Tove Alexanderson’s time, with numerous runners, including one of the main favourites Judith Wyder, all falling around thirty seconds short. But as the heavens began to open and rain spattered the cobbled streets, the Danish favourite and defending champion Maja Alm, pipped her by 17 seconds, denying Alexanderson the one individual World Championships gold medal she has yet to add to her collection.

Photo by IOF/Matias Salonen
Photo by IOF/Matias Salonen

As the rain intensified and turning into a storm, the Men’s race got underway. The cobbles by this stage had turned slick, and competitors were gingerly taking the corners around the old town. There was initial hope that this would curb the issues of the crowds, but there was no such luck.

Peter Hodkinson got things underway for the British Men and held his own in the tough conditions. A couple of errors crept into his run, though it seemed less problematic than his qualification this morning. Into the finish, he was second, 20 seconds down on the lead of Martin Hubmann (SUI), but would eventually slip to 29th –  way down on his 13th from last year. Chris Smithard was next out of the gate, and the script ran similarly to that of his teammate Peter. Though not a disaster, the competition at this level is extremely tight, and Chris would fall to 35th place by the end of the day, just not having his best day in the office – again, way down on last year’s 14th. With both though, they have confirmed their quality, with such placings from sub-optimal performances.

The main British hope of the day had to be the final GBR starter, Kristian Jones. Coming into this race, Kris was one of the hot favourites for the gold medal, and a medal was all he was aiming for. He started well, and despite an early slip, was in touch at the first split. Then, disaster struck. In the complex alleyways in the central section of the course, Kris got confused by a section of mapping which was far from clear and headed inadvertently into a restaurants kitchen – needless to say all those involved were slightly shocked. The lack of clarity on the map can often throw runners, but the glaring error here didn’t only catch out Kris but several others as well. He pushed on regardless and was still in touch, but a bad error on the 16th towards the end of the course cost him that real top result he was after. It would be 10th in the end and a 12 month wait for another chance at the title for Kris.

Photo by IOF/Matias Salonen
Photo by IOF/Matias Salonen
Photo by IOF/Matias Salonen

In the fight for gold though it was nail-biting. With the storm taking down the electrics and TV screen in the arena, it was hard to keep track of each runner in such a furious, fast and chaotic sprint, but Daniel Hubmann stormed into the lead having started with just a third of the field left to follow him 20 seconds ahead of his teammate Andreas Kyburz. So often having played second fiddle to his brother Mattias, today was Andreas’ day, seeing off repeated challenges to his podium spot, and clinching a bronze medal, despite a late charge from Belgian Yannick Michels, who finished a mere 0.6 seconds down in 4th. It was New Zealander Tim Robertson who would pose the biggest challenge to Hubmann though, trading the lead with him the entire way around the course, but just came up short at the end, finishing 1.1 seconds off the lead to take home a thoroughly deserved silver medal and allowing Hubmann to retain his title.

Results:

Women:

1. Maja Alm, Denmark, 2. Tove Alexandersson, Sweden, 3. Judith Wyder, Switzerland

GBR: Alice Leake – 8th, Charlotte Ward – 24th, Megan Carter-Davies – 28th

Men:

1. Daniel Hubmann, Switzerland, 2. Tim Robertson, New Zealand, 3. Andreas Kyburz, Switzerland

GBR: Kristian Jones – 10th, Peter Hodkinson – 29th, Chris Smithard – 35th.

 

Mixed Sprint Relay:

Tomorrow sees the Mixed Sprint Relay, and the final sprint discipline of the week takes place. GBR will again be going to a medal results, but it will be tough with so many nations on top-form. The team has yet to be released, but we will put it up online as soon as we know it.

Thank you to all those who have got involved on Twitter, hopefully, I will have better WiFi coverage tomorrow.

Will Gardner

Top