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Tweet Wednesday 11th December 2019

Children’s activity levels on the rise - Sport England Active Lives Survey

Source:  Sport England Press Release 

Children's activity levels on the rise

  • Almost half of children in England now take part in an average of 60 minutes of physical activity a day – up 3.6% from last year.
  • The rise is driven by more children getting active outside of school – 57.2% of children and young people do an average of 30 minutes or more a day outside of school, compared to 40.4% at school.
  • Significant inequalities remain in the areas of family affluence, gender and race.
Children's activity levels on the rise

This finding comes from Sport England’s ‘Active Lives Children and Young People’ report into the activity levels of the nation’s children and means that 3.3 million children are now meeting the new recommended Chief Medical Officer Guidelines - 279,600 more children than last year.

Government guidelines recommend that children and young people should get 30 minutes of their daily physical activity in the school day and 30 minutes outside of school. The figures show that there has been a rise in children getting active outside of school over the last year, with 57% (up 4.6%) doing an average of 30 minutes or more a day outside of school, compared to 40% at school.

As part of our 2016-21 strategy Towards an Active Nation, Sport England is already investing £194m in children and young people, within its remit of responsibility for sport and physical activity outside of school from the age of 5.

Activities outside of school that are on the rise include active play, team sports and walking.

At the other end of the scale, 2.1 million children and young people (29.0%) are doing less than 30 minutes of physical activity a day, and while that number is decreasing (by 3.9% over the last year) it is a reminder of how much more needs to be done. In the middle, another 1.7 million (24.2%) children are ‘fairly active’ taking part in average of 30-59 minutes a day.

The inequalities that were surfaced by the first report last year remain, with children from the most affluent families more active (54%) compared to the least affluent families (42%) while boys are more active than girls at every age from five up.

The survey also shows that active children are happier, more resilient and more trusting of others and it has also shown a positive association between being active and higher levels of mental wellbeing, individual development and community development.

Active Lives Children and Young People provides the most comprehensive overview of the sport and physical activity habits of children in England. It looks at the number of children taking part in a wide range of sport and physical activities (ranging from dance and scooting to active play and team sports) at moderate intensity, both at school and out of school. The report is based on responses from over 130,000 children aged 5-16 in England during the academic year 2018/2019, making it the largest study of its kind.

ACTIVITY SETTING – AT SCHOOL VS OUT OF SCHOOL

  • There is a difference in the amount of sport and physical activity that takes place at school, compared to activity levels outside of school – 40.4% of children are active at school for an average of 30 minutes per day while 57.2% of children are active outside of school for the same duration – an increase of 4.6% on last year.
  • At school, increases have been seen for years 3-6 (ages 7-11) - however secondary school age young people have seen no change and the youngest children (years 1-2) have seen a decrease. This is seen across boys and girls.

The report also shows that significant inequalities remain when looking at children’s activity levels:

FAMILY AFFLUENCE

  • While there have been increases in activity levels across all levels of family affluence, children and young people from families who are less affluent are still least likely to be active (42% of children in this group are active for an average of 60 minutes+ a day, compared to 54% of children and young people from families of high affluence).
  • They are also least likely to enjoy being active – 43% of children from low affluence families say they enjoy being active vs 59% from high affluent families (a 16% gap).
  • Boys from the least affluent families are more likely to be active than girls.

GENDER

  • While there have been increases in both boys and girls’ activity levels, boys are more likely to be active then girls with a gap of 319,200 between the numbers of boys who achieve the recommended amount of sport and physical activity (51% or 1.8m) and the number of girls that do (43% or 1.5m).
  • In years 9-11 (ages 13-16) there has only been an increase in activity levels for girls, and not boys, with an increase of 3.5% (29,800 number) doing an average of 60+ minutes a day.

ETHNICITY

  • Asian and black children are most likely to do less than an average of 30 minutes activity a day.

Other interesting points to note are:

AGE

  • How positively children and young people feel about sport and physical activity generally declines with age.
  • Activity levels peak when children are aged 5-7, and again at the end of primary school (age 11-12). Children are more likely to be active at these points than at any other time during their primary or secondary education. Children and young people aged 13-16 (years 9-11) are the least likely to be active.
  • There are more active children than less active children across all age groups.

TYPE OF ACTIVITY

  • Active play and informal activities remain the most common way for children in younger age groups (Years 1-6) to be active.
  • Team sports become more common as children get older. By secondary school age, team sports are the most common group of activities.

MENTAL WELLBEING BENEFITS

  • Active children and young people are more likely to report higher levels of mental wellbeing.

ATTITUDES TO SPORT AND ACTIVITY

  • The first Active Lives Children and Young People survey showed that enjoyment above all other elements of physical literacy is the biggest driver of children’s activity levels.
  • The new survey shows that girls are less likely to enjoy being active than boys with the biggest gap between the genders found around confidence and enjoyment.
  • More physically literate children are more likely to be active.
  • More physically literate children are happier, more resilient and more trusting of others.
  • The number of positive attitudes is the key driver of how active children are.

The full Active Lives Children and Young People report is available here

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Tweet Monday 9th December 2019

Graham Patten has resigned from the Board of Directors

British Orienteering announces today that Graham Patten has resigned from the Board of Directors.

Graham’s resignation is due to personal reasons and increased business commitments. Graham has resigned with regret and wishes British Orienteering and the Board all the best for the future.

Chair of the Board, Drew Vanbeck stated: "On behalf of the Board of Directors and of British Orienteering, I extend our sincere appreciation to Graham for his contribution to the sport and personally I look forward to continuing to have the benefit of Graham's wise counsel.”

Drew added, “We are in the process of searching for individuals who can fill the vacancy created by Graham’s resignation and that of Judith Holt who is due to step down from the Board at the next AGM after serving the full 9-year maximum as a director. If you are interested or know of someone who is prepared to volunteer and help British Orienteering develop and advance its strategic agenda please do not hesitate to contact me or the Chief Executive Peter Hart."

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Tweet Thursday 5th December 2019

2020 World Orienteering Day / Week - Save The Date!

The next World Orienteering Day will take place on Wednesday 13 May 2020.  

In 2020, between Wednesday 13 May and Tuesday 19 May 2020, any activity held can be registered as a World Orienteering Day event.

Vision

The International Orienteering Federation´s goals regarding the organisation of this annual event are as follows:

  • Increasing the visibility and accessibility of orienteering to young people,
  • Increasing the number of participants both in the schools’ activities, as well and in the clubs’ activities in all countries of National Federations,
  • Helping teachers to implement orienteering in a fun and educational way and and to get more new countries to take part in orienteering.

Visionary course of action

Each club of all national Orienteering Federations gets in touch with at least one school.  As teachers might need help to implement orienteering so the lessons are a fun and exciting experience, the IOF is working on providing teaching materials in different languages. 


Find out more here.

 

#worldorienteeringday

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Tweet Monday 6th August 2018

World Orienteering Championships Mixed Sprint Relay - GB take 7th

Arguably the most exciting race of the world championship week, the Mixed Sprint Relay was the second round of racing to take place in Riga this weekend, after the individual Sprint Discipline on Saturday. With teams of four – two women and two men – teams tactically place their best runners on different legs with either the aim of breaking the pack early on leg 1 (run by the women), trying to break away in the middle on legs 2 and 3 (both run by the men), or biding their time to surge through the field on leg 4 (again, run by the women).

 

The terrain was much similar to that of the Sprint Qualification, with an extensive parkland section around the arena, but with far more of the racing taking place in the residential streets and between the flat-blocks of the Āgenskalns neighbourhood.

Megan Carter Davies on the way to 7th at the end of the Mixed Sprint Relay (Photo by IOF/Matias Salnonen)

Charlotte Ward was the first leg for Britain, and she had to contend with an early pace setting from Tove Alexanderson of Sweden. Alexanderson, having taken yet another silver medal in the individual discipline to her Danish rival Maja Alm, evidently had a point to prove, front running from the gun. Charlotte was tucked into the pack as they came through the arena, with Switzerland’s Elan Roos aiding Alexanderson with the pace setting. As others began making mistakes as the race entered the more extensive forking sections in the final third, Charlotte began to move up the pack and would finish in =12 th , just 43 seconds down on the lead.

This sent Kris Jones out into the terrain and him too, like Alexanderson, was ready to put it all on the line after Saturday’s disappointment. Kris was placed on this leg tactically to break the men’s pack early on, with his superior pace compared to the rest of the field being used to open gaps in the pack. This worked spectacularly, with Kris scything through the field, pulling up to 9th by the arena passage, but gaining places all the time and finishing the leg in 2nd place, a mere 4 seconds down on the Swedish leaders, who had held their place at the front of affairs with Switzerland falling back.

Onto leg three and two distinct races seemed to form. With Sweden holding their lead in front, a chasing pack of four behind with Peter Hodkinson of GBR, Norway, Czech Republic, and Switzerland formed. Jonas Leandersson of Sweden accelerated into the race quickly, building up a near 20 second lead by the arena, increasing that only further to 47 seconds by the finish of his race. Behind, Peter Hodkinson raced to-and-fro with his rivals, holding his own and finishing the race in 4th, just 3 seconds down on 2nd place.

So, the medals were all to play for as the competitors entered the last leg. Karolin Olsson of Sweden started quickly, with the aim of keeping Swiss star Judith Wyder out of sight, and with individual champion Maja Alm starting 1 minute 44 seconds behind Olsson in 7th it was all to play for. Megan Carter-Davies for Britain was pushing hard in the pack, but with many of the world’s best runners on this last leg, it would always be hard to keep touch for a medal. Through the arena at halfway and Olsson was holding her position, but with Wyder closing the gap to 32 seconds, and Alm in seventh place, having taken back an initial ten seconds on the lead. Megan Carter-Davies had held her 4th place up to this point, but the pressure was beginning to mount from behind, and as they entered the second half though Alm began to light the afterburners. Putting in a similar run to Britain’s Kristian Jones, she cut swathes through the field pulling up from 7th into 4th and then, just running out of distance on the course, into 3rd place to take yet another medal for the Danish team in what seems to be their favourite discipline. Out in front, it was too much for Wyder to do to take back Olsson’s lead, and Switzerland had to settle for silver as Sweden took the gold medal. Behind, a late mistake for Megan cost her some time, and she slipped to 7th overall.

It wasn’t the result the GBR team had dreamed of, and they will be disappointed to finish just off the podium, but it only went to emphasise that we are consistently strong in this discipline, and when the racing goes our way medals will come to this talented group!

Full Results:

1. Sweden
2. Switzerland
3. Denmark

4. Norway
5. Czech Republic
6. Russian Federation
7. Great Britain

 

Well done to our sprints, that’s it for the Urban disciplines. Next up, we head to the forests of Sigulda for the Middle Distance race on Tuesday, with the first start at 9:56 UK time. The GB starts for the discipline are as follows:

Women:

Charlotte Watson – 11:14
Megan Carter-Davies – 11:18
Catherin Taylor – 11:58

Men:

Alasdair McLeod – 13:10
Ralph Street – 14:04

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