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Tweet Monday 20th May 2019

World Orienteering Day and Octavian Droobers Orienteering Club

Octavian Droobers Orienteering Club juniors Florence and Tabitha Lunn were live on BBC Coventry and Warwickshire radio on Tuesday night last week talking about World Orienteering Day happening at Abbey Fields, Kenilworth on Wednesday 15 May – celebrating the start of World Orienteering Week.

They also spoke enthusiastically about their recent performance representing England at the World Schools Orienteering Championships in Estonia and this weekend helping their school to win the West Midlands Schools Championships at Cannock Chase.

Karin Kirk Publicity Officer for and member of Octavian Droobers Orienteering Club, said: 

“As well as our World Orienteering Day event on Wednesday last week we have also welcomed and given instructions to 40 school children around the grounds of Compton Verney in Warwickshire. It was their first ever experience of orienteering.”

"A thrilled 6 year old having completed her first orienteering course said that she 'cannot wait to come to our next events'."

 

British Orienteering would like to thank Octavian Droobers Orienteering Club for again supporting World Orienteering Day and for putting on two great local events. 

World Orienteering Day 2019
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Tweet Monday 20th May 2019

World Orienteering Week: Interview with Cat Taylor

World Orienteering Week: Interview with Cat Taylor

Posted by  | May 19, 2019 |

The elite orienteer discusses her route into the sport and its crossover with running.

Cat Taylor started orienteering at the age of seven and made her GB debut in 2012, going on to achieve results including bronze at the European Championships and a win at a World Cup round.

After seven years of living and training in Sweden, the South Yorkshire Orienteers athlete now lives in Sheffield and combines training with work as a translator. In the spring and summer she is often on the road for camps and competitions and is currently on a training camp in Norway.

Ahead of August’s World Orienteering Championships in Norway and as part of World Orienteering Week, Taylor shares some insight into her sport and its crossover with running.

Athletics Weekly: What was your route into orienteering? Were you a runner, or an orienteer, first?

Cat Taylor: I’ve been orienteering since I was tiny, I was definitely an orienteer first! I did cross country at school, along with lots of other sports, and I was okay but never great. Of course I do a lot of running now but it’s all as training for orienteering. I run a few fell races and have done a couple of 10km on the roads (my best is 35:32) but it’s never been a main focus. I do enjoy racing any kind of running where I can fit it in but I always have quite a packed programme.

Cat Taylor

AW: What do you love most about orienteering?

CT: I first got hooked when I started running off the paths, just straight through the forest. It’s a great feeling of freedom. I also like that the physical and technical challenge is really different from place to place. A track is the same anywhere but for example, a forest near Stockholm is a lot different from one near Madrid and to be consistently good at orienteering you have to be very adaptable.

AW: How do you prepare for major championships? Do you have an ‘average’ training week?

CT: At home, I try to do a good mix of running training – a bit of everything on all surfaces – and consistent technique training. It means quite a bit of variety but I do have a consistent week plan. The toughest thing with this sport is that specific preparation for a championship means travelling to terrain and race in similar conditions to those you’ll face on the big day. You’re not allowed to run or even visit the area you will race in before you actually start but can get a good idea of the kind of challenge by training in the forests nearby. So this year I’m spending altogether about five weeks on World Championships training camps (near Oslo, Norway). All the travel can sometimes disrupt training but it’s a necessary compromise.

AW: Can you talk about the crossover between the two sports and the necessary skill sets?

CT: Once you’ve learned the basic navigation techniques you need to orienteer, it’s mainly about managing the balance between running quickly but still concentrating on navigation. The higher your aerobic threshold, the faster you can run without being in the “red zone” (where you need to concentrate hard on the running, meaning you can’t make decisions as well and risk getting lost!). My physical training works towards being as good an all-round runner as possible; you have to be strong up hills, down hills, in rough terrain, through marshes, over rocks and on flatter, fast surfaces.

The biggest difference for me is the feeling on the start line. Even in cross country you know exactly where the course will go, where it’s going to hurt, you can have a pretty exact plan for how to run each bit. In orienteering you can have very little idea of where you’ll be going until the clock starts, you pick up the map and runoff. You’re also often alone all the way and have to be very good at pushing yourself and keeping positive because it’s almost impossible to run completely without technical mistakes.

AW: What are your key 2019 targets in both running and orienteering?

CT: I’ve actually had a pretty rubbish time this last winter. I’ve been injured and doing a lot of alternative training but I’m still aiming to be back in top shape by August to fight for the very highest positions in the World Orienteering Championships (near Oslo, Norway). I’ve frustratingly had to reign in running plans while I recover but am gradually getting back into action. Because all the most important competitions this summer are in soft terrain I’ll not prioritise racing on the road or running much track at all, but I’ll hopefully have time for some local fell races in the coming months.

AW: What are you most proud of having achieved in your elite career so far?

CT: I’ve had a few good international results so far, including a win at a World Cup round and a bronze medal at the European Championships. I’m happy any time I feel like I’ve got the most from myself on an important day, it means that the project I’ve been working on for months or even more has been successful and it’s that feeling that makes all the pain and expense worthwhile!

For more, see cattaylor.net

For more on the latest athletics news, athletics events coverage and athletics updates, check out the AW homepage and our social media channels on TwitterFacebook and Instagram

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Photo by Rob Lines

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Tweet Monday 20th May 2019

20% Forest Holidays discount for May/June breaks

British Orienteering is delighted to announce that they have negotiated with Forest Holidays for all members of British Orienteering for you to get a 20% discount off May/June breaks at any of their 10 locations, in any cabin type.  

In May and June, you’ll find many great reasons to enjoy a Forest Holiday. Woodland walks are a delight with carpets of bluebells, birdsong in the trees and the promise of summer in the air. Enjoy sunny days pond dipping with the kids, long evenings out on the patio beneath the trees or sitting under the stars in your hot tub when the sun goes down. It’s a great time to enjoy the forest in all its glory before the busy summer holidays.

If you’re looking something more active, why not “Go Ape” in the treetops, climb mountains or set sail on the seas and lochs, perhaps with a picnic beneath the shade of an old oak tree afterwards? Remember - British Orienteering members can also get 10% off their Go Ape entry fees and make another saving!  And with Father’s Day in June, why not treat Dad? Anything is possible; from the high-adrenaline, set-your-pulse-racing stuff, to long, lazy days pottering in the forest, listening to birdsong on a morning run. Freedom awaits when you book your Forest Holidays break in May or June this year.  

Terms and conditions:  All breaks booked between 10 May and 30 June 2019. 
To access the discount members simply need to log-in into the member section on the British Orienteering website to gain access to the discount codes.

Make sure you make the most of your membership - and save money!  Why not take a look at all the other discounts and offers available to you as a member of British Orienteering?  With British Orienteering membership you can save money with holiday providers, airport car parking, hire cars, sports shoes, socks, outdoor kit and loads more from national organisations and brands. 

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Tweet Friday 10th August 2018

PreO Day 2 at the World Trail Orienteering Championships

On a day of blazing sunshine Team GB faced an extremely tough challenge in the complex mix of woodland and sand quarries provided by Jauna Forstate, the venue for the second part of the PreO competition.

Only nine competitors scored the maximum 33 correct controls, Annti Rusanen of Finland just beating Jan Furucz of Slovakia to take 1st place on the day. Tom Dobra, with 31 correct controls, was best placed Team GB member, 24th on the day but 16th overall- well done Tom! Nick Barrable, with 30 correct, came 34th, both on the day and overall, while John Kewley, with 29 correct, came 38th on the day and 46th overall. In the public competition held on the same course later in the day, Ian Ditchfield, Graham Urquhart and Colin Duckworth had a good day, scoring 31, 27 and 25 respectively.

In the Paralympic class, Dick Keighley came 26th (27th out of 40 overall). Conditions were particularly hard for the Paras, the blazing heat making the extra time allowance almost a disadvantage, and all came in hot and tired.

Friday 10th sees WTOC end in style with a remarkably complicated Relay event. It's an 8:30 am quarantine for Nick Barrable, Ian Ditchfield and Tom Dobra! We wish them the best of luck

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