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Tweet Tuesday 15th January 2019

An Introduction to Orienteering presented by Graham Gristwood

South London Orienteering Club (SLOW) has produced a video to help inform and guide beginners on what to expect at their first orienteering race. The film, which covers the orienteering map, courses, controls, equipment and what to wear, will be released at 5 pm on South London Orienteers' YouTube channel at 5 pm on 9th January. Graham's video

The film starts with an example of an orienteering map showing what the different colours and symbols mean, and then goes on to explain how courses are represented and examples of what might be on offer. The next section shows what orienteers mean by 'controls' with map inserts relating to features in the forest and then there is some information on equipment and kit so anyone can be ready to start a race.

SLOW were delighted that Graham Gristwood agreed to host the video as his enthusiasm and expertise add greatly to the presentation. The filming took place in Barr Wood near Stirling with the woods looking very tempting bathed in winter sunshine.

The film ends with Graham linking to the series of Skills Videos (also on South London's Youtube Channel) so that once beginners have the guide they can easily see explanations of techniques to help them improve.

South London Orienteers hope that clubs and affiliated groups will use this video to promote the sport to new participants and increase awareness of our sport.

For more information, please contact South London Orienteers, Sarah Brown: sarah@slow.org.uk

Graham Gristwood
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Tweet Monday 14th January 2019

British Orienteering Annual Awards 2018 – Nominations Now Open!

There are thousands of people who are committed to the development and delivery of orienteering within the UK each year. British Orienteering is looking for nominees for our 2018 awards and wants to recognise and reward some of the great work being done across the sport of orienteering by our clubs, coaches, mappers and volunteers of all ages.

Who do you think deserves recognition for their hard work, dedication and effort they have given tirelessly to our sport throughout 2018? British Orienteering would like to recognise the dedication and achievement of the many outstanding individuals within the sport.

We are delighted to announce that we are now actively accepting nominations for British Orienteering National Annual Awards. This year we have introduced a new category – Volunteer of the Year Award. This is an exciting new development! The Volunteer of the Year Award recognises one outstanding adult volunteer for their valuable time and commitment they have given over the year. This is in addition to the Young Volunteer Award which recognises commitment from those under the age of 25. We are delighted to introduce this new category into British Orienteering Annual Awards for 2018. Who do you think deserves to be recognised and nominated for this new award? Details of all the Volunteer, Club and Mapping Awards are outlined here, together with the criteria and nomination process for each Award. 

2018 Club, Coach and Volunteer Awards

Each year British Orienteering presents a number of awards to recognise the incredible effort and impact delivered by clubs, coaches and volunteers across orienteering.
 

2018 Award Categories Open for Nominations are as follows:

Club of the Year Award

Is your club an important part of the local community?

  • Providing opportunities for everyone to experience high-quality activities at all levels of your sport or recreation?

  • Demonstrating a commitment to the development of participants as well as coaches and volunteers?

  • Taking an innovative approach to the promotion of the club?

Club of the Year Nomination Form – can be found here.



University Club of the Year Award

This award recognises the efforts of University Clubs in the development of participants as well as coaches and volunteers. The award is also to show appreciation for the University introducing and providing a gateway to the sport to their students.

University Club of the Year Nomination Form – can be found here.


 

Coach of the Year Award

Coach of the Year award is looking for coaches who demonstrate success in one or more of the following areas:

  • engaging new people in orienteering
  • improving the performance of orienteers
  • mentoring and developing other coaches

Coach of the Year Nomination Form – can be found here.



Young Volunteer of the Year Award

This award is for a volunteer, under the age of 25, who has demonstrated a commitment to supporting delivery of orienteering activity with passion, energy and enthusiasm.

Young Volunteer of the Year Nomination Form – here.



Volunteer of the Year Award - new category!

This award is for a volunteer who has demonstrated a commitment to supporting delivery of orienteering activity with passion, energy and enthusiasm.

Volunteer of the Year Nomination Form – can be found here.


 

SILVA Award

- a person or persons who have made a very significant contribution to orienteering over a period of years, with an emphasis on ‘field' activities rather than committee work.

In 1983 SILVA (Sweden) AB decided to mark the fiftieth anniversary of the first Silva compass by establishing an annual award within each IOF member Federation. The awards were to enable Federations to honour those who have contributed in a special way to the development of orienteering. With the assistance of SILVA (UK) Ltd this was interpreted, within the UK, as being a person or persons who have made a very significant contribution to orienteering over a period of years, with an emphasis on ‘field' activities rather than committee work. Indeed, nominees may not be active or retiring members of the British Orienteering Board, nor part- or full-time employees of the Federation.

All members can nominate someone they believe has made a significant contribution to orienteering through ‘field’ activities.

SILVA Award Nomination Form – can be found here.


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2018 Mapping Awards

To encourage the production of high-quality maps the Map Group, on behalf of British Orienteering, awards a number of trophies to encourage high standards of mapping and related activities.

All nominations for the Mapping Awards below should be made by Sunday 24th February 2019 and winners will be presented with their awards at the 2019 AGM.

Terry Smith, Chair of the Mapping Group, said: “We continue to be impressed with the high standard of maps submitted for the Mapping Awards. We particularly look forward to receiving nominations from, or on behalf of, new mappers and those who have not previously submitted entries.”

2018 Mapping Award Categories Open for Nominations are as follows: 

Chichester Trophy

The Chichester Trophy was donated by the Honorary President of the British Orienteering Federation in 1971, Sir Francis Chichester. The Trophy consists of the binnacle compass used on Sir Francis' 'round the world' yacht, Gipsy Moth V, mounted on a wooden plinth. The Trophy was first awarded in 1971 to Robin Harvey and Sue Bone for their map of Leith Hill. It was originally awarded for the Best Map produced in a single year, though later it was awarded for multiple maps or contribution to mapping. In 1985, with the introduction of the 'Bonington Trophy', the 'Chichester Trophy' reverted to the original concept of the best map produced by an amateur mapper.

Mapping Award Nomination Form – can be found here.



SILVA Trophy for Professional Maps

With the high standard of professionally surveyed and drawn orienteering maps being produced in Britain, the British Orienteering Map Group decided, in 1992, that a new trophy should be awarded in recognition of these mapping companies. The Map Group annually awards the 'Silva Trophy' to the best professionally produced map. This trophy, sponsored by SILVA U.K. Ltd. is made from Stourbridge crystal. This irregular shape, called cullet in the trade, is formed when the unused crystal cools. The base was made by Mike Baggott of Harlequins from English elm and the solid silver plate was purchased from a bullion supplier in Birmingham’s Jewellery Quarter and engraved nearby.

Mapping Award Nomination Form – can be found here.


 

Walsh Trophy

This trophy was made by Mike Baggott of HOC and is sponsored by Walsh Shoes. The trophy is made of old walnut with a triangular cross-section and an etched plate with an image of Canary Wharf, London. It is awarded annually to the best urban or sprint map drawn to ISSOM specification.

Mapping Award Nomination Form – can be found here.


Bonington Trophy

This trophy was donated to British Orienteering by its Honorary President, Sir Chris Bonington, the world-famous mountaineer. The trophy consists of a piece of rock collected from the summit of Mount Everest on Chris' 1985 expedition, mounted on a wooden plinth. It is awarded annually for the 'best contribution to mapping' which can cover a whole range of activities related to mapping.

Bonington Trophy Nomination Form – can be found here.

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Who are you going to nominate?

To find out more about the awards and how to nominate, click here.

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Tweet Monday 14th January 2019

Heading back off to University?

Heading back to University after the Christmas break and New Year celebrations...

Looking at exercising and keeping fit between studying, try orienteering?  

Orienteering is a challenging outdoor adventure sport that exercises both the mind and the body. The aim is to navigate in sequence between control points marked on a unique orienteering map and decide the best route to complete the course in the quickest time. It does not matter how young, old or fit you are, as you can run, walk or jog the course and progress at your own pace.

University Orienteering is a great place to either continue to be involved in orienteering or start it from new. There are a number of Universities with clubs and groups around the UK.

There are many orienteering clubs already being enjoyed by many students at Universities across the UK at different stages of their studies. Some who have just started their degrees, others preparing for their finals. Orienteering challenges body and mind.

Joining in is easy!

Here are details of University Orienteering Clubs with the contact links for each:

Aberdeen University Orienteering Club (AUOC)
Facebook

University of Bristol Orienteering Club (UBOC)
Website
Facebook

Cambridge University Orienteering Club (CUOC)
Website
Facebook

Durham University Orienteering Club (DUOC)
Website
Facebook

Edinburgh University Orienteering Club (EUOC)
Website
Facebook

Glasgow University Orienteering Club (GUOC)
Facebook

Leeds University Orienteering Club (LUUOC)
Website
Facebook

Loughborough University Orienteering (LUOC)
Website
Facebook

Oxford University Orienteering Club (OUOC)
Website
Facebook

University of Sheffield Orienteering Club (SHUOC)
Website
Facebook

University of Newcastle Orienteering Club (UNOC)
Website
Facebook

University of York Orienteering Club (UYOC)
Website
Facebook

 

More information about these clubs can be found here.
 

If your University hasn't got an Orienteering Club, then why not set up your own University Orienteering club or group?
Support and advice are available, simply contact the National Office.  Email: info@britishorienteering.org.uk
 

Still interested in orienteering, but just want to know more?  Find out more here.

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Tweet Wednesday 7th November 2018

Exercise inequalities leave millions of women inactive

  •  This Girl Can returns with new inspirational Fit Got Real message to reach women of all backgrounds and ethnicities who feel left behind by traditional exercise

  • Women in lower paid and routine jobs are twice as likely to be inactive as those in senior managerial roles

  • South Asian and black women are also more likely to be inactive than white women

  • Sport England’s campaign, which is funded by The National Lottery, launches a new film showing real women using practical, inventive and unconventional ways to fit exercise into their lives.

Sport England has today launched the latest phase of its This Girl Can campaign, Fit Got Real, which aims to tackle the inequalities in levels of exercise between different social groups of women.

This Girl Can returns with new inspirational Fit Got Real message

The latest Active Lives Adult Survey1 from Sport England highlights these imbalances, with women in lower paid, routine jobs almost twice as likely to be inactive (doing less than 30 minutes of exercise a week) compared to women in senior and managerial roles (33.5% compared to 17.7%). The survey also showed significant differences in activity levels amongst women of different ethnicities, with women of a South Asian background (36%) and black women (29.4%) more likely to be inactive than white British women (25.3%).

Sport England research2 shows that a mix of practical and emotional pressures, such as lack of time, fear of judgement and lack of confidence, prevent many women from being as active as they would like. The insights also highlight that many of these pressures come from the way marketing, the media and TV often portray exercise as being for women who have the money to afford gym memberships, expensive sports clothes or plenty of free time.

The campaign is looking to inspire and motivate women with its new Fit Got Real film by showing real women of different ages and ethnicities doing exercise their own way - whether that is running around a park pushing their child in a pram, hula hooping at home or teaching themselves how to swim using YouTube - and sharing the message that no matter how unconventional, it all counts as exercise.

Jennie Price, Chief Executive of Sport England comments:
“There are some stark inequalities when it comes to different levels of exercise amongst women in England. Many of the pressures of modern life do not make it easy for women to have the confidence and motivation to be active. The health and wellbeing benefits of being active should be available to all women, and that is why we have a new message - Fit Got Real – to celebrate the creative and often unconventional ways many women are fitting exercise into their busy lives.”

Caroline, 36, who stars in the new film, comments:
“As a full-time carer, I rarely have time to myself and am often under a lot of pressure both emotionally and physically. At the end of the day, I always felt I was either too tired, didn’t have enough time or wasn’t motivated enough to exercise. But, one day I realised how important it was (for my mental and physical health) to spend some time on myself and, with the help of my friends and support groups in the community, I could see a way out! Rather than spending half an hour watching TV, I now get out to a dance class or over to the trampoline classes at the local community centre. With added daily pressures of work and family commitments, I completely understand how easy it is to get into a routine of not doing much exercise, but I feel so much happier and healthier from being more active. Even it’s a quick run up and down the garden it’s better than nothing!”

Having already inspired almost 3 million women to be more active since launching in 2015, This Girl Can’s new campaign is designed to appeal to an even wider range of women by showing images and telling stories of the realities of getting active for many women.

Along with the new adverts and online film, This Girl Can’s website and social channels will showcase women talking about how they fit exercise into their lives, why they like it and the negative perceptions and barriers they overcame to be more active.

For more information about This Girl Can’s Fit Got Real campaign, please visit: www.thisgirlcan.co.uk

The new Fit Got Real film is available to view and download here.

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