News

News

Latest news

Tweet Tuesday 18th June 2019

Pre-EYOC/JWOC Race Diary by Grace Molloy (Forth Valley Orienteers)

Last weekend saw the athletes selected for Junior World Orienteering Championships (JWOC) and European Youth Orienteering Championships (EYOC) heading across to Aarhus, Denmark, to take part in the Danish junior test races happening in the Aarhus and Silkeborg areas.

This Pre-EYOC/JWOC camp focused on finalising preparations for both competitions taking place in a few weeks time, with EYOC running from June 28-30 in Grodno, Belarus and JWOC being held in Silkeborg between 7-12 July. The three test races included a sprint in Marienlystparken, Aarhus on Saturday, a long in Himmelbjerget on Sunday and a middle in the same forest on Monday, before the team flew back later that day. Jennie Taylor, Communications Officer at British Orienteering asked a couple of the athletes travelling out to Denmark to keep a diary of the weekend. Read Grace Molloy's diary account of her time away.

Pre-EYOC/JWOC 2019 Diary Reflections 

GRACE MOLLOY:

Forth Valley Orienteers

Profile

------

Friday 7 June 2019

Morning:
The team travelled to Aarhus to prepare for the summer international competitions.

Afternoon:
Various athletes took the opportunity to either familiarise or refamiliarise themselves with the Silkeborg terrain whilst others went for an easy run to stretch out the legs after travelling.

Evening:
We had a meeting focussed on the sprint for JWOC where we discussed what we thought the terrain would be like and what challenges it would present.

Classroom discussions. 

 

Saturday 8 June 2019


Morning:
Some of the team did long or middle style training in a relevant forest but some people rested in advance of the test sprint in the afternoon. I ran middle controls in a group to test lines in the terrain and then we ran a few longer legs with to test out route choices.

Afternoon:
The first test race was a sprint and the Danes and the Fins were using it as a JWOC selection race. There were also lots of other JWOC athletes from different countries who were racing to prepare for the competition. The sprint was of medium technicality and we performed well, especially considering most of the other athletes would have prepared for this race and rested in the lead up to it. British athletes achieved the 2nd fastest time of the day of both the boys and girls.

Evening:
We analysed what we had learned from the sprint and then looked ahead to the long terrain for JWOC. Some of the area was used for WOC 2007.

Girls after the Sprint.  

 

Sunday 9 June 2019


Morning:
The long test race was on a much greener map than the other areas we have been training on and that presented more technically challenging legs. Once again, we were able to place amongst the other nations which was a good confidence boost for the British athletes.

Afternoon:
We made use of the hotel spa for well-deserved recovery :)

Evening:
Some of the team struggled in the lower visibility terrain in the long distance so we discussed how to best to orienteer in the terrain. We then looked at the JWOC middle area and thought about how we would tackle a few tricky legs.

Peter Molloy in the sprint. 
Training chats. 
Lizzie Stansfield finishing the Long

Monday 10 June 2019

Morning:
The final test race of the weekend was a middle distance on the same area as the long. It was a very challenging course with the majority in slow, low visibility forest. Many of the team had trouble navigating but it was useful to have this practice before the real competition.

Afternoon:
The team travelled home - better informed about the JWOC terrain and excited to come back to race in less than 4 weeks time.

-----

Photo credits: Rona Lindsay

 

Thank you, Grace.  We wish you all the very best with your training preparations over the next weeks.
Top
Tweet Monday 17th June 2019

World Orienteering Day 2019 – Snapshot of Orienteering Activity in the UK Continued...

Dartford Orienteering Klubb

Dartford Orienteering Klub held a number of events with 105 adults and 990 children orienteering.  

15 May 2019 Hackney:  365 participants, event held by David LeFevre.
16 May 2019 Marlborough School:  277 participants, event held by Neil Speers.
20 May 2019 Urswick School, Hackney:  138 partipants, event held by David LeFevre.
21 May 2019 Bexley Primary:  234 partipants, event held by Allison Page.
21 May 2019 Bexley Park Race:  81 partipants, event held by Andrew Evans

Totally 1,095 participants comprising of 105 Adults and 990 children. 

Photo credits: Dartford Orienteering Klub

South Yorkshire Orienteers

South Yorkshire Orienteers celebrated World Orienteering Day with a lovely sunny evening event on Wednesday 15th May. 176 people enjoyed the stunning views across Sheffield from Bole Hills and The Rivelin valley. There were 6 different courses, all expertly planned by the Lightfoot family, catering to the wide range of participants on the night including toddlers, brownies, schools children, super vets, students, runners and experienced club members. After the event, many club members adjourned to the local pub to enjoy a special World Orienteering Day Menu!

South Yorkshire Orienteers 
Special WOD 2019 menu

Mar Orienteering Club

"It was a busy World Orienteering Week in Maroc Land in northeast Scotland, with five different activities on offer on various days, organised and run by a range of different groups.

First off, the club held one of their Forest Sprint events at Deeside Activity Park and Dess woods to celebrate World Orienteering Day itself, on a gloriously sunny Wednesday evening. There was a good turn out of 41 runners and the kind weather encouraged everyone to linger and socialise.
On Thursday it was the turn of the 18 pupils in class P4-7 at Braemar school to try orienteering in their playground, with courses which had been planned and set up by class teacher Mrs Wood. Braemar school enjoyed participating in orienteering as part of the 2016-18 Cairngorm Leader COPE project and it is fantastic to see a legacy of the development work continuing in this way.

Later in the day, 13 enthusiastic members of the Aboyne cluster after-school club tackled some special WOW themed courses in Castle Woods. The biggest challenge of the session proved to be trying to solve the puzzle of the WOW link!

On Friday, orienteering was one of the activities on offer at Mearns Academy as part of their festival of sport. The Academy recently commissioned an orienteering map of their grounds and this was one of the first opportunities to try it out. With instruction from club member Andy Oliver, six S3 girls enjoyed the new experience and challenge.

Finally, on Tuesday it was the turn of Upper Deeside schools to get together for a festival in the woods adjacent to Crathie school. The festival was organised by the local Active Schools Co-ordinators with course planning and support from Maroc members. 31 pupils from four small schools- Tarland, Logie Coldstone, Strathdon and Crathie - all had a great time finding their way around the most scenic extended playground in the UK. There were some really impressive scores recorded, again demonstrating legacy from development work undertaken through the COPE project.

All in all a successful World Orienteering Week which offered a taster of the sport to a wide range of different people."

World Orienteering Day at Braemar
Aboyne
Aboyne map

Potteries Orienteering Club

Potteries Orienteering Club held 3 activities in Central Forest Park to mark World Orienteering Week.

We held 3 activities over three days based on our permanent orienteering course.  This is our latest permanent orienteering course and was designed with easier controls only.

DAY 1: Wednesday 15 May. 
We ran a SCORE course which was intended to cater for the Urban Activities regulars.  10 extra controls were added using the bright numbered stickers on lamp posts, as per the Urban Activities.

  • 10 members took part on this course.
  • Peter Munn and 3 of his outdoor group members tackled the basic course.
  • 9  Girl Guides  + 4 adults went on specific courses designed by Marian.
  • Mark Clews and Jonathan Whilock visited all 26 in about 33 mins.... Lil Bales  - all in about 43 min. Everyone else returned in the allotted 45 mins.

The next 2 days catered for groups and non-orienteers.

DAY 2:  Thursday 16 May.
It was clear from the lack of bookings that no one was expected on this day. However, I still felt I needed to be prepared, but no one came. I  hold the record for the planner of an event with the lowest attendance ...2 at Forest Park about 20 years ago. Can I claim to have beaten this with an Activity?

DAY 3:  Friday 17 May. 
A contrast. 42 Brownies or Guides + 12 adults turned up to tackle Marian's special courses.   

Day 3, along with the Guide groups on Day 1, used the permanent orienteering course posts in a series of short loops in order to spread out the participants.

-----

Army Orienteering Association

As part of WOD 2019, the Army Orienteering Association (AOA) hosted the Army Inter Unit Team Championships at Longmoor, Hampshire, over the period 15-16 May 19. The Championships were organised by the Royal Army Physical Training Corps (RAPTC) and the Army Air Corps (AAC).

Day 1 was based on four Spanish Score courses (Long, Medium and 2 x Short variants). There were 5 categories: Open, Masters, Women’s, Under 25 and Guests. Dependent on the category entered, teams comprised of four or three competitors. Team times from 1 rolled forward to Day 2.

Day 2 used the Team Harris format with a long variant for teams of four and a short variant for teams of three. Times from Day 2 were added to times from Day 1 to determine overall category winners.

In total, 182 participants took part over the 2-day event.

We even introduced a new discipline....moo-rienteering!

How did you, your club or school take part in World Orienteering Day & Week?

Email:  jtaylor@britishorienteering.org.uk and be included in the next snapshot to celebrate our sport globally!

Top
Tweet Sunday 16th June 2019

Highlighting our Volunteer and Mapping Awards Winners Again!

British Orienteering has supported Volunteer's Week (1 - 7 June 2019), and as it closes let's celebrate our Volunteer and Club Awards Winners again!

Celebrating and thanking again all this year's Volunteer and Club Award Winners

Young Volunteer of the Year 2018 

Winner:  Holly Stodgell of Walton Chasers 

Holly has started up an after-school orienteering club at her school and is leading the training sessions, providing motivation to the group and setting the training schedule. She has coordinated a group of adults to take on the coaching and getting the group from nothing to light green/green standard is a huge achievement. 

It is great to see the next generation of volunteers so committed to the sport.

Young Volunteer of the Year
Volunteer of the Year

Volunteer of the Year 2018 

As part of our Year of the Volunteer, we launched this new award to recognise those volunteers committed to orienteering.  

Winner:  Alan Honey of Bristol Orienteering Klub 

In 2018 Alan has been Chairman of Bristol Orienteering Klub (BOK), organised the British Sprint Championships at Bath University, initiated the successful Track to Terrain project, started a training course for new coaches and volunteered numerous club events and activities. Alan put huge amounts of personal time and effort into these projects and, together with the team he leads has been responsible for BOK’s continuing successes. 

The commitment shown by all volunteers to the sport is a fantastic example of some of the work going on to deliver and develop orienteering across the UK. Congratulations to Alan Honey who this year is announced as Volunteer of the Year 2018.   

University Club of the Year 2018 

University Club of the Year 2018 

Winner:  Loughborough University Orienteering Club is University Club of the Year 2018. 

After the club was revived in 2014 following a long period of being dormant, LUOC has gradually increased membership, participation orienteering activities at the university to become one of the UK’s most active student orienteering clubs. The club has a busy training schedule with sessions on most weekday evenings and regular competition on weekends with much support for local club events from LEI, DVO, NOC and OD. Regular coaching for beginners means many have progressed to competiting on m/w21 elite courses. The club works closely with the University to support volunteers in a range of training provision for coaches and volunteers.  

It is fantastic to see such strong University Clubs and we can only hope that we see more University Clubs developing this strength in the future. 

Club of the Year 2018 

Winner:  South Yorkshire Orienteers is Club of the Year 2018. 

South Yorkshire Orienteers 

In 2018 SYO has continued to grow and develop through offering a wide-ranging program of events, club nights, socials and monthly coaching sessions. Club Nights are a recent addition initially funded by Sport England they are now self-sustaining with 60-70 participants per week during term time. The clubs Volunteer Coordinator ensures that the club's program is well supported and run regular training opportunities for members. In 2018 the club introduced a point scheme similar to parkrun where participants and volunteers get points towards a club t-shirt for their participation. SYO have strong links with community organisations across Sheffield and this has led to a diverse participant and member demographic.  

Peter Palmer Coach of the Year 2018 

Winner:  Jason Falconer of Wessex Orienteering  

Jason is Head Coach of Wessex Orienteering and regularly delivers the Tuesday evening club training for all members. In addition, Jason works closely with Active Dorset to promote Orienteering, delivering a series of coached sessions over 6 weeks (half a term) to groups of Key Stage 2 children. The sessions progress through all skills of the sport and include a competition finale using S.I. kit; often off-site on one of WSX permanent courses. In Autumn of 2018 Jason worked closely with Beat the Street to link families in the Poole area to the club. 

SILVA Award 

SILVA Award winner 2018 is John Warren (Wimborne Orienteers).

John has been an active member of Wimborne Orienteers since 1976 and in the years following has been involved in all aspects of orienteering. John took on the assistant organiser role for the JK in 1979 just 3 years after starting in the sport and didn’t look back organising, planning and controlling events at all levels over the past 42 years including organising the World Orienteering Championships Relays at Avielochan in 1999. Yet John has a particular passion in working with newcomers, helping introduce them to the sport and he is always on hand to offer skills advice and encouragement. He works closely with the local council to deliver Activate events and acting as lead coach for club activities on permanent courses he helped map, plan and install.

To quote John: ‘
‘Volunteering’ hasn’t been so much of an effort, it has mostly been a real sense of satisfaction and I hope that in a small way has contributed to a lot of people having enjoyable experiences taking part in the sport that we love." 

British Orienteering would like to again take this opportunity to say a massive 'THANK YOU' to all this year's award winners as well as to everyone who makes orienteering happen across the country every week.  

Top
Tweet Wednesday 5th December 2018

British Orienteering Annual Awards 2018 – Nominations Now Open!

There are thousands of people who are committed to the development and delivery of orienteering within the UK each year. British Orienteering is looking for nominees for our 2018 awards and wants to recognise and reward some of the great work being done across the sport of orienteering by our clubs, coaches, mappers and volunteers of all ages.

Who do you think deserves recognition for their hard work, dedication and effort they have given tirelessly to our sport throughout 2018? British Orienteering would like to recognise the dedication and achievement of the many outstanding individuals within the sport.

We are delighted to announce that we are now actively accepting nominations for British Orienteering National Annual Awards. This year we have introduced a new category – Volunteer of the Year Award. This is an exciting new development! The Volunteer of the Year Award recognises one outstanding adult volunteer for their valuable time and commitment they have given over the year. This is in addition to the Young Volunteer Award which recognises commitment from those under the age of 25. We are delighted to introduce this new category into British Orienteering Annual Awards for 2018. Who do you think deserves to be recognised and nominated for this new award? Details of all the Volunteer, Club and Mapping Awards are outlined here, together with the criteria and nomination process for each Award. 

2018 Club, Coach and Volunteer Awards

Each year British Orienteering presents a number of awards to recognise the incredible effort and impact delivered by clubs, coaches and volunteers across orienteering.
 

2018 Award Categories Open for Nominations are as follows:

Club of the Year Award

Is your club an important part of the local community?

  • Providing opportunities for everyone to experience high-quality activities at all levels of your sport or recreation?

  • Demonstrating a commitment to the development of participants as well as coaches and volunteers?

  • Taking an innovative approach to the promotion of the club?

Club of the Year Nomination Form – can be found here.



University Club of the Year Award

This award recognises the efforts of University Clubs in the development of participants as well as coaches and volunteers. The award is also to show appreciation for the University introducing and providing a gateway to the sport to their students.

University Club of the Year Nomination Form – can be found here.


 

Coach of the Year Award

Coach of the Year award is looking for coaches who demonstrate success in one or more of the following areas:

  • engaging new people in orienteering
  • improving the performance of orienteers
  • mentoring and developing other coaches

Coach of the Year Nomination Form – can be found here.



Young Volunteer of the Year Award

This award is for a volunteer, under the age of 25, who has demonstrated a commitment to supporting delivery of orienteering activity with passion, energy and enthusiasm.

Young Volunteer of the Year Nomination Form – here.



Volunteer of the Year Award - new category!

This award is for a volunteer who has demonstrated a commitment to supporting delivery of orienteering activity with passion, energy and enthusiasm.

Volunteer of the Year Nomination Form – can be found here.


 

SILVA Award

- a person or persons who have made a very significant contribution to orienteering over a period of years, with an emphasis on ‘field' activities rather than committee work.

In 1983 SILVA (Sweden) AB decided to mark the fiftieth anniversary of the first Silva compass by establishing an annual award within each IOF member Federation. The awards were to enable Federations to honour those who have contributed in a special way to the development of orienteering. With the assistance of SILVA (UK) Ltd this was interpreted, within the UK, as being a person or persons who have made a very significant contribution to orienteering over a period of years, with an emphasis on ‘field' activities rather than committee work. Indeed, nominees may not be active or retiring members of the British Orienteering Board, nor part- or full-time employees of the Federation.

All members can nominate someone they believe has made a significant contribution to orienteering through ‘field’ activities.

SILVA Award Nomination Form – can be found here.


-----

2018 Mapping Awards

To encourage the production of high-quality maps the Map Group, on behalf of British Orienteering, awards a number of trophies to encourage high standards of mapping and related activities.

All nominations for the Mapping Awards below should be made by Sunday 24th February 2019 and winners will be presented with their awards at the 2019 AGM.

Terry Smith, Chair of the Mapping Group, said: “We continue to be impressed with the high standard of maps submitted for the Mapping Awards. We particularly look forward to receiving nominations from, or on behalf of, new mappers and those who have not previously submitted entries.”

2018 Mapping Award Categories Open for Nominations are as follows: 

Chichester Trophy

The Chichester Trophy was donated by the Honorary President of the British Orienteering Federation in 1971, Sir Francis Chichester. The Trophy consists of the binnacle compass used on Sir Francis' 'round the world' yacht, Gipsy Moth V, mounted on a wooden plinth. The Trophy was first awarded in 1971 to Robin Harvey and Sue Bone for their map of Leith Hill. It was originally awarded for the Best Map produced in a single year, though later it was awarded for multiple maps or contribution to mapping. In 1985, with the introduction of the 'Bonington Trophy', the 'Chichester Trophy' reverted to the original concept of the best map produced by an amateur mapper.

Mapping Award Nomination Form – can be found here.



SILVA Trophy for Professional Maps

With the high standard of professionally surveyed and drawn orienteering maps being produced in Britain, the British Orienteering Map Group decided, in 1992, that a new trophy should be awarded in recognition of these mapping companies. The Map Group annually awards the 'Silva Trophy' to the best professionally produced map. This trophy, sponsored by SILVA U.K. Ltd. is made from Stourbridge crystal. This irregular shape, called cullet in the trade, is formed when the unused crystal cools. The base was made by Mike Baggott of Harlequins from English elm and the solid silver plate was purchased from a bullion supplier in Birmingham’s Jewellery Quarter and engraved nearby.

Mapping Award Nomination Form – can be found here.


 

Walsh Trophy

This trophy was made by Mike Baggott of HOC and is sponsored by Walsh Shoes. The trophy is made of old walnut with a triangular cross-section and an etched plate with an image of Canary Wharf, London. It is awarded annually to the best urban or sprint map drawn to ISSOM specification.

Mapping Award Nomination Form – can be found here.


Bonington Trophy

This trophy was donated to British Orienteering by its Honorary President, Sir Chris Bonington, the world-famous mountaineer. The trophy consists of a piece of rock collected from the summit of Mount Everest on Chris' 1985 expedition, mounted on a wooden plinth. It is awarded annually for the 'best contribution to mapping' which can cover a whole range of activities related to mapping.

Bonington Trophy Nomination Form – can be found here.

-----

Who are you going to nominate?

To find out more about the awards and how to nominate, click here.

Top