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Tweet Tuesday 19th February 2019

Looking to try a new sport over the half-term holidays?

WHAT IS ORIENTEERING?

Orienteering is a sport that combines map reading and running. You have to find your way between a series of checkpoints, called controls, as quickly as possible. There’s no set route between the controls, so you have to decide which way to go and then find your way there without getting lost.

At each control point is an orange and white control flag as well as an electronic punch which records that you have visited the control. When you finish you get an immediate computer printout which tells you your overall time, and your time between each control.

Orienteering is a sport for all ages and abilities.

GETTING STARTED

A great way to get started in orienteering is to attend your local Community Orienteering Club that provides weekly training and activities that will enable you to develop your orienteering skills in a non-competitive and social environment. If you have never orienteered before this is the ideal place to learn the basic skills and meet people from the local club. To find your local Orienteering Club visit: www.britishorienteering.org.uk/find_a_club

To get started all you need is a pair of trainers and comfortable sports clothes. At the event, you will be given a map and a mechanism for recording your visits to the control points marked on the map. The majority of events now use electronic punching cards (dibbers) to prove you have visited the controls in the correct order.

Permanent Orienteering Courses are also great fun. To find your nearest course visit: www.britishorienteering.org.uk/pocs

EVENTS

To experience the full excitement of orienteering you can attend an orienteering event. An event will have courses that are run according to age class and sex or courses that are classified by length and difficulty. Winning requires running speed and stamina, as well as the ability to find the quickest route between controls. To find an orienteering event visit: www.britishorienteering.org.uk/events

TRY ORIENTEERING!

To find out more or to find orienteering activities and events in your area visit: www.britishorienteering.org.uk/event and search for activities.

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Are you interested in orienteering, but don’t know enough about the sport?
This set of Frequently Asked Questions will help you find out more.

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Tweet Monday 18th February 2019

JK2019 Announced in Athletics Weekly today!

Read their full article here.

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Tweet Saturday 16th February 2019

Come rain or shine – be outdoors this half-term with Xplorer!

Xplorer is a family-friendly fun navigation challenge that is educational and gives children a sense of adventure as they explore the park to find the markers.

It involves a healthy mix of physical activity and decision making that the whole family can enjoy together.

Using a simple map, the aim is to find a number of markers that are located around the park. At each marker, children need to identify what is pictured and enjoy learning a fun fact to tell their friends. Older children will have fun competing against their friends or other family members whilst younger children will enjoy the excitement of successfully finding the markers.

No previous experience of map reading is needed, and parents are encouraged to join in the fun!

Find Xplorer events happening this February Half Term – here.

Find all Xplorer activities are listed here.

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Tweet Tuesday 4th December 2018

WADA Prohibited List 2019: What you need to know

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) has published the 2019 List of Prohibited Substances and Methods, and British Orienteering wants to ensure you know all the key details before it comes into effect on 1 January.

Whether you’re an orienteer, coach, physio or doctor, it’s vital you are aware of the changes, so you don’t get caught out and end up with a ban from sport.

The list outlines substances and methods which are banned both in and out-of-competition, but it is not exhaustive as most categories only include common examples. It’s updated annually and gives you time to get to grips with any changes before the New Year but please also be aware that changes can also be made to the Prohibited List throughout the year.

Several of the changes relate to supplements, or ingredients commonly found within them, while there is also more information around gene doping and examples of certain substances being known by a different name.

More details can be found on the UK Anti-Doping (UKAD) website, so please take the time to have a read through to ensure you don’t get caught out.

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