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Tweet Friday 22nd May 2020

Resumption of orienteering: Phase 1 United Kingdom

Resumption of orienteering: Phase 1 United Kingdom

The updated UK government guidance published on 11 May 2020 permits the resumption of outdoor sports in England where you take part alone, within a household group, or with one person from outside your household from whom you must stay two metres apart at all times.

The updated guidance from the NI Executive published on 18 May 2020 permits Groups of 4 – 6 people who do not share a household can meet outdoors maintaining social distancing.

This will allow us to resume a limited set of individual orienteering activities in these parts of the country, as set out below.

There is no change to the current position in Scotland and Wales, and so orienteering activities in these parts of the UK must remain suspended for now.

As a sport, we must work together to resume orienteering responsibly as and when the relevant government determines it is safe to do so. The Board have committed to following the respective advice of each government, and therefore there are likely to be periods when types of orienteering activities permitted will vary between different parts of the UK, depending on the government guidelines and regulations.

In England and the Isle of Man, we moved to Phase 1 of the resumption of orienteering with effect from 14 May 2020.

In Northern Ireland, we will move to Phase 1 with effect from 22 May 2020.

This will mean that clubs and individuals can:

  • Promote the use of Permanent Orienteering Courses (POCs)
  • Make maps with pre-marked courses available
  • Promote the use of MapRun or Routegadget and other virtual orienteering courses (VOCs),
  • Carry out mapping and planning for future events

The full guidance can be downloaded here.

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Tweet Thursday 28th May 2020

Interview #4: Training in Lockdown with Kirstin Maxwell (Roxburgh Reivers)

British Orienteering is continuing to publish a series of interviews this week with GB elite athletes on how the restrictions of lockdown have impacted on their daily and weekly training. 

The series continues with Kirstin Maxwell GB elite athlete and member of Roxburgh Reivers Orienteers.

 

Kirstin Maxwell

Club: Roxburgh Reivers Orienteers (RR)

Athlete Profile

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How have the current restrictions impacted on your training?
Kirstin:  “In a way it's changed my plan a lot. I was working part-time for six months focusing on orienteering and was due to go on a number of sprint training camps/races in the UK and abroad which obviously never happened. However, I've gone back to work full-time but I am still able to train lots. I love running so don't need a goal to get out the door. Sessions have changed slightly as I can't access a track and can't run more than once a day but can do turbo sessions instead and I've taken a step back to more of a base/build phase rather than sharpening. Dad has turned the conservatory into a gym and I've enjoyed getting out on the road bike for a change. There's a lot of hills in my runs and I'm lucky to have endless quiet trails close to home where I can just switch off and enjoy running. The weather has been strangely nice in Scotland so I've even managed yoga in the garden!”

Kirstin Maxwell

What advice have you got for other athletes or members in a similar position?
Kirstin:  “The situation is out of our control so right now it's important to just enjoy getting out in the fresh air, staying fit and switching off mentally. It's good to focus on little things you maybe wouldn't have before, I'm making a conscious effort to stretch more.”

 

What is your number one Lockdown training session?
Kirstin:  “I've brought back a number of old sessions from the past, the "Lanton loops" terrain tempo session with hills, mud, terrain, trails etc. used to be the one I dreaded but I know it made me really fit so I'm making sure I get it in weekly.”


Have you still been able to access support from your coach or orienteering athlete friends, and if so how?

Kirstin:  “I was actually due to move flats at the beginning of April so moved out of my old one early as anticipated lockdown was coming and didn't want to be stuck so I'm back down with my parents. While this obviously isn't ideal having had my own space for 10 years, it means I'm living in the countryside and with Dad who is one of my coaches. It's good because he can see how sessions go and we always work well together pushing each other on. I usually communicate with other coaches through Skype etc. so nothing has changed there. I'm lucky to still have company for training when I want it but I do miss my training partners and teammates as keeping in touch virtually isn't the same.”

 

What box sets have you been able to catch up on during Lockdown?
Kirstin:  “I'm really bad at just sitting down and relaxing so actually haven't had time to watch anything long. I've gone back to learning a language on Duolingo and I've been kept busy by cooking for my family, trying to cook interesting meals every evening as well as baking treats at the weekend.”

 

Have you been doing any DIY tasks - anything you want to tell us about?
Kirstin:  “I have a huge bin bag of orienteering maps which I haven't filed in years which I'm making my way through. It takes forever as I get distracted looking at courses and remembering the races.”

 

Anything else you wish to share on any other aspects of Lockdown training?
Kirstin:  “Scottish Athletics have organised virtual races including National Road Relays where I had to run a solo 10km as well 15min and 1mile time trials. My club has been really good at putting teams together and encouraging people which has been a nice feeling with a bit of "race pressure" and team-spirit. I'm really excited to race again though as definitely fitter than I've ever been.”

 

Thank you Kirstin. We wish you all the best with your on-going training.

 

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As a sport, we must work together to resume orienteering responsibly as and when the relevant government determines it is safe to do so.

The Board of Directors at British Orienteering have committed to following the respective advice of each government, and therefore there are likely to be periods when types of orienteering activities permitted, vary between different parts of the UK, depending on the government guidelines and regulations.

The latest statement from British Orienteering can be found here.
Resumption of Orienteering

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Tweet Wednesday 27th May 2020

Interview #3: Training in Lockdown Interview with Fiona Bunn (TVOC / CUOC)

As GB Orienteering Athletes are getting more and more used to the ‘new normal’, British Orienteering asks how lockdown restrictions have impacted on their daily and weekly training routines and drills.

British Orienteering is publishing a series of interviews this week with GB athletes. 

Here is the next interview with GB elite athlete Fiona Bunn member of 
Thames Valley Orienteering Club and Cambridge University Orienteering Club.

Fiona Bunn

Club (National): Thames Valley Orienteering Club / Cambridge University Orienteering Club

Club (International): Sodertalje Nykvarn Orientering (SNO)

Athlete Profile

Garden gym set-up

How have the current restrictions impacted on your training?

Fiona: “It’s impacted on racing plans of course, and as a result I’ve also not been able to do any technical training from where I live, although I think this is not a problem as we are so far out from any races right now. Physical training hasn’t changed too much. It’s sad not to be able to train with a group, but as I am currently rehabbing from an injury I’m in a good position now as I’m able to really take my time on the come back and focus on building slowly and doing all the right exercises. The overall strategy has shifted more into winter training and building a base in the absence of the summer race calendar.

I also can’t do my usual gym sessions but I’ve been adapting at home, and was luckily given a friend’s old barbell at the start of lockdown which gives lots of opportunities!”

 

What advice have you got for other athletes or members in a similar position?

Fiona: “Use this time to work on your weaknesses, or make your strengths into super strengths! Whilst it’s important to form a good routine, it’s also good to experiment with a few new exercises/session styles to try to mix things up and keep a new stimulus! There’s loads of resources on the internet being released. I know some people who are using lockdown as a long experiment to try out a different type of training and see how their body responds, without the pressure of having upcoming races.

Also try to keep in touch with training partners and motivate each other. We’ve been doing Virtual circuits with the Cambridge running club, and a Fantasy league style series with different challenges every few weeks such as different distance races and a 100m elevation challenge for example.”

What is your number one Lockdown training session?

Fiona: “I’m not currently doing any speedwork due to my injury rehab, but I’ve been enjoying running around a marshy field to keep the terrain work going and hopefully come back a more robust athlete with stronger ankles! I’ve also enjoyed the Lockdown orienteering competitions online.”

 

Have you still been able to access support from your coach or orienteering athlete friends, and if so how?

Fiona: “I keep in email contact with my coach usually anyway so not too much has changed there. I’m also hoping to join in with an SNO training camp from afar, along with some of their other international runners in lockdown. I think Skype yoga is on the list which could be interesting.”

 

What box sets have you been able to catch up on during Lockdown?

Fiona: “Boringly not much, I’m still nice and busy with revision for Finals at Uni! I’m enjoying the repeats of Outnumbered on TV though.”

 

Have you been doing any DIY tasks – anything you want to tell us about

Fiona: “Again not much! We’re starting a veg patch with the prospect of actually being at home for long enough over summer to look after it, but that’s it.”

 

Anything else you wish to share on any other aspects of Lockdown training?

Fiona: “Now is a good time to use some creativity and plan for the future! Whether it is making a bank of future training/armchair planned courses, creating new maps for example see the UK Elite Orienteering league competition, new online resources such as all the fantastic new websites being developed by the Lockdown Orienteering challenge or just reflecting on previous performances and writing down some aims for the future or coming up with new exercises to train different skills. I’m excited to see what new ideas we emerge from lockdown with, and also excited to enjoy coming back to races with a new founded appreciation!”

Steep hill climb before lockdown

Thank you Fiona. We wish you all the best with your studying and on-going training.

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As a sport, we must work together to resume orienteering responsibly as and when the relevant government determines it is safe to do so.

The Board of Directors at British Orienteering have committed to following the respective advice of each government, and therefore there are likely to be periods when types of orienteering activities permitted, vary between different parts of the UK, depending on the government guidelines and regulations.

The latest statement from British Orienteering can be found here.
Resumption of Orienteering

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Tweet Friday 26th April 2019

Junior Selections for World Orienteering Championships, European Youth Championships and Junior European Cup announced

The British Teams for the 2019 Junior World Orienteering Championships, European Youth Championships and Junior European Cup have been announced. 

Many congratulations to the following athletes who have been selected to represent Great Britain in the 2019 Junior World Orienteering Championships which are being held in Silkeborg, Denmark, 4th-13th July. 

Men 

Women 

Freddie Carcas (LUOC/INT)  

Zac Hudd (WCOC) 

Eddie Narbett (EUOC/BOK) 

Peter Molloy (FVO)  

Alastair Thomas (EUOC/WCOC)  

Finlay Todd (GUOC/INVOC) 

 

Non-Travelling Reserve: 

Finn Lydon (EUOC/LEI) 

Fiona Bunn (CUOC/TVOC) 

Eilidh Campbell (MAROC) 

Megan Keith (INVOC) 

Laura King (EUOC/AIRE) 

Niamh Hunter (WCOC) 

Grace Molloy (FVO) 

 

Non-Travelling Reserve: 

Emma Wilson (EUOC/CLYDE) 

Many congratulations to the following athletes who have been selected to represent Great Britain in the 2019 European Youth Orienteering Championships, which are being held in Grodno, Belarus, 26th - 30th June 2019. 

Men 

Women 

Jim Bailey (BOK) 

David Bunn (TVOC) 

Joe Hudd (WCOC) 

Flurry Grierson (DEVON) 

Matthew Gooch (MAROC) 

Rachel Brown (ESOC) 

Anika Schwarze-Chintapatla (EBOR) 

Lizzie Stansfield (FVO) 

Alice Wilson (CLYDE) 

 

Many congratulations to the following athletes who have been selected to represent Great Britain in the 2019 Junior European Cup to be held in Ardeche, France, 25th- 29th September 2019. 

Men  

Women 

David Bunn (TVOC) 

Matthew Gooch (MAROC)  

Flurry Grierson (DEVON) 

Zac Hudd (WCOC) 

Peter Molloy (FVO) 

Alastair Thomas (EUOC/WCOC) 

 

 

Eilidh Campbell (MAROC) 

Niamh Hunter (WCOC)  

Megan Keith (INVOC) 

Grace Molloy (FVO) 

Anika Schwarze-Chintapatla (EBOR) 

Tara Schwarze-Chintapatla (EUOC/EBOR) 

Lizzie Stansfield (FVO) 

Alice Wilson (CLYDE) 

Junior Selections Announced

Teams will be reviewed and confirmed following EYOC and JWOC.   

Paul Murgatroyd, Head Coach for Talent, commented:   
“Following a challenging round of selection races, culminating in last weekend’s JK, it is an honour to announce the selections for this year’s international competitions. The JWOC team is a talented group and has some exciting potential here, with some 'veteran' athletes, such as Fiona Bunn going to her fifth and final JWOC, along with others, such as Megan Keith, last year’s EYOC Gold medallist in the sprint, appearing at JWOC for the first time. Denmark is a very different challenge to last year’s competition in Hungary and the forests around Silkeborg should suit many of our fast runners, such as Grace Molloy, Eddie Narbett and Freddie Carcas! I am also excited also to see the potential in the EYOC team, with three promising M/W16's making their international debuts, and some of the M18’s looking to build on their strong debuts in Bulgaria last season. Finally, the JEC team brings many of these two groups together to gain further international exposure in the beautiful Ardeche region of France. This will be the culmination of a long, hard season, but also give us an indication of who will be in the mix for next year’s JWOC in Turkey. Good luck to all involved in the summer's racing!" 

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