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Tweet Tuesday 2nd June 2020

Resumption of Orienteering Update 1 June 2020

British Orienteering is reviewing their guidance regularly in response to the latest government advice to understand what is possible and permissible as conditions are being relaxed. Our priority remains to protect the health of our members, volunteers and staff and help to suppress the spread of the COVID-19 virus.

New guidance has been announced by governments in England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland and Isle of Man easing restrictions on the number of people you can meet outside which impacts on how and where individuals can exercise.

We are awaiting more details of how exactly the guidance will apply to orienteers across all nations and will update this statement once official guidance has been published.

In the meantime, we are working to ensure we can provide orienteers with clear information on what is possible and permissible in the current phase of lockdown measures being eased.

 

Further details can be found here.

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Tweet Tuesday 2nd June 2020

Interview #9: Training in Lockdown with Alice Leake (Airienteers)

British Orienteering is continuing to publish a series of interviews with GB elite orienteering athletes focusing on their training during lockdown.

This series of interviews now continues with Alice Leake GB elite athlete and member of Airienteers.

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Alice Leake

Club: Airienteers (AIRE)

Athlete Profile

 

How have the current restrictions impacted on your training?
Alice: I’m lucky that, other than the inability to go orienteering and having to do my club interval sessions alone, my training isn’t too different from how it was before the lockdown.

I was originally supposed to be attending several sprint training weekends in the UK and a World Orienteering Championships training camp in Denmark, however these were obviously cancelled in light of the current restrictions.

Instead I’ve been enjoying the flexibility of being able to train in the daytime as I’m working from home now, and just trying to maintain my current good running form with a training programme similar to what I was doing throughout the winter. I plan to keep on with this until we know more about when any orienteering races might take place.”

Alice Leake (Airienteers)

How have the current restrictions impacted on your training?
Alice: I’m lucky that, other than the inability to go orienteering and having to do my club interval sessions alone, my training isn’t too different from how it was before the lockdown.

I was originally supposed to be attending several sprint training weekends in the UK and a World Orienteering Championships training camp in Denmark, however these were obviously cancelled in light of the current restrictions.

Instead I’ve been enjoying the flexibility of being able to train in the daytime as I’m working from home now, and just trying to maintain my current good running form with a training programme similar to what I was doing throughout the winter. I plan to keep on with this until we know more about when any orienteering races might take place.”

 

What advice have you got for other athletes or members in a similar position?
Alice: “Obviously do what works for you and your individual circumstances, but I’ve found exercise to be really good for my mental health and for keeping a sense of normality at the moment.

This could be a good opportunity to work on your overall fitness – for example I’ve been trying to do some more core work and stretching as I know this is an area I don’t always make time for when life is busy.

However I think there’s nothing wrong with just exercising for enjoyment at the moment and doing whatever brings you happiness right now – whether that be going for a run, taking part in lockdown orienteering, looking at old courses online, or just checking in with a clubmate.”

 

What is your number one Lockdown training session?
Alice: “I’ve really been enjoying getting out for a long run each week. Normally it feels like a bit of a chore trying to fit them in, but with more free time I’ve really been appreciating exploring new footpaths in my local area and taking the time to notice new things.”

 

Have you still been able to access support from your coach or orienteering athlete friends, and if so how?
Alice: “Yes. We’ve been having regular catch up calls and WhatsApp groups to keep each other motivated, and my running coach has been sending me two sessions to complete each week. It’s helped me to feel less worried about the uncertainty of the situation as it’s given some structure to my weeks, and I trust that my fitness will still be there when the races do return. I like knowing that, even if we’re not physically together, we’re all still suffering through the intervals and accountable to each other!”

 

What box sets have you been able to catch up on during Lockdown?
Alice: “Series 1 and 2 of Race Across the World – getting my travel fix without leaving the sofa!”

 

Have you been doing any DIY tasks – anything you want to tell us about?
Alice: “I don’t think DIY is my strong point! I’ve been learning to cook some new dishes instead.”

 

Thanks Alice. Wishing you all the very best with your on-going training.

 

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As a sport, we must work together to resume orienteering responsibly as and when the relevant government determines it is safe to do so.

The Board of Directors at British Orienteering have committed to following the respective advice of each government, and therefore there are likely to be periods when types of orienteering activities permitted, vary between different parts of the UK, depending on the government guidelines and regulations.

The latest statement from British Orienteering can be found here.
Resumption of Orienteering

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Tweet Monday 1st June 2020

Interview #8: Training in Lockdown - Jonathan Crickmore (SHUOC)

British Orienteering is publishing a series of interviews with GB athletes focusing on the impact of lockdown has on their training.

Jonathan Crickmore is a GB elite athlete and member of Sheffield University Orienteering Club.

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Jonathan Crickmore

Club: (National): Sheffield University Orienteering Club

Club (International): OK Ravinen

Athlete Profile

 

How have the lockdown restrictions impacted on your training?
Jonathan: “My training hasn't been affected too much. I am restricted to training from the house so very limited orienteering but the running is good. Also being stuck at my partner's family house in NZ has advantages of plenty exploring to be done as they are mostly new routes to me.”

Jonathan Crickmore (SHUOC)

What advice have you got for other athletes or members in a similar position?
Jonathan: “My advice to other people is enjoy the running. There aren't going to be any major competitions for a while so just get out and enjoy it, explore every track or bit of woods you can nearby. Find little challenges for yourself if you want. These don't have to be time trials but for example try and do as much climb on your local hill without repeating climbs or find the shortest way to run all the streets in your village/neighbourhood.”

 

What is your number one Lockdown training session?
Jonathan: “Put on my shoes, run up to the hills and keep running for as long as I fancy.”

 

Have you still been able to access support from your coach or orienteering athlete friends, and if so how?
Jonathan: “I have kept in touch time zone permitting through usual social media channels but I've always been self-coached and self-motivated so I'm not noticing a lack of input, I am missing all the training partners especially when doing a session.”

 

What box sets have you been able to catch up on during Lockdown?
Jonathan: “Not too many box sets. My laptop decided to die on day one of quarantine which is slightly heart breaking especially as I can get it fixed in the UK but not here. So been working my way through the book collection and a variety of board games and jigsaws.”

 

Have you been doing any DIY tasks – anything you want to tell us about?
Jonathan: “Trying to fix old computers and laptops in the house so I can find some computing projects to do. Otherwise just the usual cooking, gardening and some small woodwork bits.”

 

Thanks Jonathan. All the best with your on-going training.

 

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As a sport, we must work together to resume orienteering responsibly as and when the relevant government determines it is safe to do so.

The Board of Directors at British Orienteering have committed to following the respective advice of each government, and therefore there are likely to be periods when types of orienteering activities permitted, vary between different parts of the UK, depending on the government guidelines and regulations.

The latest statement from British Orienteering can be found here.
Resumption of Orienteering

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Tweet Thursday 11th July 2019

Junior World Championship Silver Medal for Bunn!

The medals keep on coming for Great Britain in Silkeborg, Denmark at the Junior World Orienteering Championships. Fiona Bunn will be bringing home a Silver medal from the Middle distance race at what is her last JWOC. 

All those who made it through to the A final from the qualifier yesterday had relatively late starts with the medallist Fiona Bunn setting off second last. 

In the men's race, Freddie Carcas was first off of the team heading out into the forest to deliver a solid performance to finish in 42nd in an extremely strong men's field. Alastair Thomas produced a strong performance on some tired legs to finish 25th overall. 

In the women's race, GB hopes were high after two medals from the first two races. Eilidh Campbell started well, in 15th fastest split at the first radio control but had a large error losing 11 minutes on one leg but held it together to not lose too much time overall. Grace Molloy had a poor start hitting the first radio control down in 33rd but set about reeling in the field for the rest of the course. She had another powerful run, this time alongside Elena Pezzati who pushed her all the way to the finish with Grace's final position 12th.

Fiona pushed hard all the way to the end
Fiona celebrating with her teammates

But the star of the show was Fiona Bunn who, in her last ever JWOC individual race, after 5 trips to the Junior Championships, stayed calm under pressure to execute a fantastic race for the silver medal. After winning her heat Fiona had clearly demonstrated the ability to put together a medal-winning performance in this world-class field but there were nerves. The past two medal races Fiona had started really well with some of the fastest splits of any athlete in the field but so far she had not been able to string together a full race. There was no such issue today as Fiona ran solid splits leg after leg with only ever minor errors and stormed through the final run in. 

After downloading to confirm all was well and a quick media interview which you can catch along with all the results and GPS on https://www.jwoc2019.dk. Fiona was mobbed by her teammates, so happy for her to have captured another British Medal and Fiona's first on the World stage.

Due to the protest at the conclusion on the Women's Long race, there were two podium presentations with British athletes today as Grace Molloy collected her second Bronze of the championships before Fiona Bunn got one of the loudest cheers of the day on collecting her Silver medal.

The Medal girls now have one more race to get up for before completing what is already the most successful Junior World Orienteering Championships ever for Great Britain. Tomorrow sees them join forces with Megan Keith to push for team glory in the Forest Relay. 

GB will field four teams the other women's team will feature Eilidh Campbell, Niamh Hunter and Laura King. Men's teams will be Freddie Carcas, Eddie Narbett and Alastair Thomas and a second team of Finlay Todd, Peter Molloy and Zac Hudd. 

Fiona and Grace shared the podium after today's medal ceremonies
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