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Tweet Wednesday 11th December 2019

Children’s activity levels on the rise - Sport England Active Lives Survey

Source:  Sport England Press Release 

Children's activity levels on the rise

  • Almost half of children in England now take part in an average of 60 minutes of physical activity a day – up 3.6% from last year.
  • The rise is driven by more children getting active outside of school – 57.2% of children and young people do an average of 30 minutes or more a day outside of school, compared to 40.4% at school.
  • Significant inequalities remain in the areas of family affluence, gender and race.
Children's activity levels on the rise

This finding comes from Sport England’s ‘Active Lives Children and Young People’ report into the activity levels of the nation’s children and means that 3.3 million children are now meeting the new recommended Chief Medical Officer Guidelines - 279,600 more children than last year.

Government guidelines recommend that children and young people should get 30 minutes of their daily physical activity in the school day and 30 minutes outside of school. The figures show that there has been a rise in children getting active outside of school over the last year, with 57% (up 4.6%) doing an average of 30 minutes or more a day outside of school, compared to 40% at school.

As part of our 2016-21 strategy Towards an Active Nation, Sport England is already investing £194m in children and young people, within its remit of responsibility for sport and physical activity outside of school from the age of 5.

Activities outside of school that are on the rise include active play, team sports and walking.

At the other end of the scale, 2.1 million children and young people (29.0%) are doing less than 30 minutes of physical activity a day, and while that number is decreasing (by 3.9% over the last year) it is a reminder of how much more needs to be done. In the middle, another 1.7 million (24.2%) children are ‘fairly active’ taking part in average of 30-59 minutes a day.

The inequalities that were surfaced by the first report last year remain, with children from the most affluent families more active (54%) compared to the least affluent families (42%) while boys are more active than girls at every age from five up.

The survey also shows that active children are happier, more resilient and more trusting of others and it has also shown a positive association between being active and higher levels of mental wellbeing, individual development and community development.

Active Lives Children and Young People provides the most comprehensive overview of the sport and physical activity habits of children in England. It looks at the number of children taking part in a wide range of sport and physical activities (ranging from dance and scooting to active play and team sports) at moderate intensity, both at school and out of school. The report is based on responses from over 130,000 children aged 5-16 in England during the academic year 2018/2019, making it the largest study of its kind.

ACTIVITY SETTING – AT SCHOOL VS OUT OF SCHOOL

  • There is a difference in the amount of sport and physical activity that takes place at school, compared to activity levels outside of school – 40.4% of children are active at school for an average of 30 minutes per day while 57.2% of children are active outside of school for the same duration – an increase of 4.6% on last year.
  • At school, increases have been seen for years 3-6 (ages 7-11) - however secondary school age young people have seen no change and the youngest children (years 1-2) have seen a decrease. This is seen across boys and girls.

The report also shows that significant inequalities remain when looking at children’s activity levels:

FAMILY AFFLUENCE

  • While there have been increases in activity levels across all levels of family affluence, children and young people from families who are less affluent are still least likely to be active (42% of children in this group are active for an average of 60 minutes+ a day, compared to 54% of children and young people from families of high affluence).
  • They are also least likely to enjoy being active – 43% of children from low affluence families say they enjoy being active vs 59% from high affluent families (a 16% gap).
  • Boys from the least affluent families are more likely to be active than girls.

GENDER

  • While there have been increases in both boys and girls’ activity levels, boys are more likely to be active then girls with a gap of 319,200 between the numbers of boys who achieve the recommended amount of sport and physical activity (51% or 1.8m) and the number of girls that do (43% or 1.5m).
  • In years 9-11 (ages 13-16) there has only been an increase in activity levels for girls, and not boys, with an increase of 3.5% (29,800 number) doing an average of 60+ minutes a day.

ETHNICITY

  • Asian and black children are most likely to do less than an average of 30 minutes activity a day.

Other interesting points to note are:

AGE

  • How positively children and young people feel about sport and physical activity generally declines with age.
  • Activity levels peak when children are aged 5-7, and again at the end of primary school (age 11-12). Children are more likely to be active at these points than at any other time during their primary or secondary education. Children and young people aged 13-16 (years 9-11) are the least likely to be active.
  • There are more active children than less active children across all age groups.

TYPE OF ACTIVITY

  • Active play and informal activities remain the most common way for children in younger age groups (Years 1-6) to be active.
  • Team sports become more common as children get older. By secondary school age, team sports are the most common group of activities.

MENTAL WELLBEING BENEFITS

  • Active children and young people are more likely to report higher levels of mental wellbeing.

ATTITUDES TO SPORT AND ACTIVITY

  • The first Active Lives Children and Young People survey showed that enjoyment above all other elements of physical literacy is the biggest driver of children’s activity levels.
  • The new survey shows that girls are less likely to enjoy being active than boys with the biggest gap between the genders found around confidence and enjoyment.
  • More physically literate children are more likely to be active.
  • More physically literate children are happier, more resilient and more trusting of others.
  • The number of positive attitudes is the key driver of how active children are.

The full Active Lives Children and Young People report is available here

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Tweet Monday 9th December 2019

Graham Patten has resigned from the Board of Directors

British Orienteering announces today that Graham Patten has resigned from the Board of Directors.

Graham’s resignation is due to personal reasons and increased business commitments. Graham has resigned with regret and wishes British Orienteering and the Board all the best for the future.

Chair of the Board, Drew Vanbeck stated: "On behalf of the Board of Directors and of British Orienteering, I extend our sincere appreciation to Graham for his contribution to the sport and personally I look forward to continuing to have the benefit of Graham's wise counsel.”

Drew added, “We are in the process of searching for individuals who can fill the vacancy created by Graham’s resignation and that of Judith Holt who is due to step down from the Board at the next AGM after serving the full 9-year maximum as a director. If you are interested or know of someone who is prepared to volunteer and help British Orienteering develop and advance its strategic agenda please do not hesitate to contact me or the Chief Executive Peter Hart."

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Tweet Thursday 5th December 2019

2020 World Orienteering Day / Week - Save The Date!

The next World Orienteering Day will take place on Wednesday 13 May 2020.  

In 2020, between Wednesday 13 May and Tuesday 19 May 2020, any activity held can be registered as a World Orienteering Day event.

Vision

The International Orienteering Federation´s goals regarding the organisation of this annual event are as follows:

  • Increasing the visibility and accessibility of orienteering to young people,
  • Increasing the number of participants both in the schools’ activities, as well and in the clubs’ activities in all countries of National Federations,
  • Helping teachers to implement orienteering in a fun and educational way and and to get more new countries to take part in orienteering.

Visionary course of action

Each club of all national Orienteering Federations gets in touch with at least one school.  As teachers might need help to implement orienteering so the lessons are a fun and exciting experience, the IOF is working on providing teaching materials in different languages. 


Find out more here.

 

#worldorienteeringday

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Tweet Friday 8th November 2019

Club and Members Forum 2019 - Agenda Announced

Notice of Meeting

The Board have decided to widen the attendance of this year’s Club and Association Conference to enable wider participation and consultation. The Club and Members Forum will be held at 11:00 am on Saturday, 16th November 2019 at The Studio, Riverside West, Whitehall Road, Leeds, LS1 4AW,  a short walk from Leeds Railway Station.

Registration will open at 10:30 am.

Invitations to attend:

  •  Association Representatives
  •  Club Representatives
  •  Members of the British Orienteering Board and Committees
  •  Individual Members

The venue has a limited capacity of 80 and spaces will be allocated on a first-come, first-served basis.
To register your place at the Forum, please complete and return the registration form to info@britishorienteering.org.uk. 

Agenda

The Board would like to place the following items on the Agenda:

  •  A Refresh of the Strategic Plan.
    Phase one of the strategy development will happen at the British Orienteering Board meeting on Saturday, 12th October - following this meeting the key outcomes will be circulated to members.
  • The characteristics of a club.

To view the agenda, please click here.

Venue

The venue is a short walk (700m, 8 minutes) from Leeds rail station. More information on the location and travel details can be found here.

Expenses

For registered delegates, the costs of the conference including refreshments and a light buffet lunch will be paid for by British Orienteering.

All members are invited to attend, and we would encourage as many as possible to come along and have your say!

As in previous years, we also encourage clubs and associations to nominate two chosen representatives to represent their views. Clubs and Association Chairs or Secretaries must confirm the names of the two delegates attending on behalf of their club or association.  This will register their attendance and these club and association delegates will be eligible to have a contribution to their expenses paid by British Orienteering (contributions will be as per below criterion).

All other members are very much encouraged to attend; however, any expenses will need to be covered by the individual, club or association depending on individual arrangements.

Car
Where the total round trip to and from the conference venue exceeds 150 miles, British Orienteering will meet the costs of half of the mileage that exceeds 150 miles (at British Orienteering’s standard rates). Here are examples:

  •  A delegate travelling a round-trip total of 310 miles could claim 25p (standard mileage rate) x 160 miles (excess over 150 miles) x 0.5 i.e. £20 from British Orienteering, and the rest must be met by the delegate or the delegate’s club or association.
  •  A delegate travelling a round-trip total of 200 miles with another delegate as a passenger could claim 27p (standard mileage rate with a passenger) x 50 miles (excess over 150 miles) x 0.5 i.e. £6.75 from British Orienteering, with the rest to be met by the delegate or the delegate’s club or association.
  • For a delegate travelling a round-trip total of 120 miles, the costs to be met in full by the delegate or the delegate’s club or association.

British Orienteering Expenses Claim Form

Train / Plane
British Orienteering will meet half of the cost of the cheapest standard class return plane/train ticket, including parking after deducting £30. As an example, a delegate whose rail ticket costs £30 and £20 parking could claim 0.5 x £20 (£50-£30) i.e. £10 from British Orienteering, with the rest to be met by the delegate or the delegate’s club or association. Other conditions;

  • A maximum of two claims per club or association will be accepted. These claims must only be from the club or association delegates who had their attendance registered with the National Office prior to the conference (or from any substitutes sent in the place of the registered delegate).
  • Any claims must be made on the claim form available at the conference and be received by British Orienteering by Friday, 6th December 2019 and only in exceptional circumstances with claims after this date be accepted for payment.
  • Plane, Train and parking ticket claims must be supported by a ticket receipt or used tickets.
  • Other expenses will only be payable if agreed in advance in writing by British Orienteering.
  • Please arrange to share cars wherever possible to minimise costs.

British Orienteering Expenses Claim Form

For anyone requiring more information please contact the admin team at;

British Orienteering National Office, Scholes Mill, Old Coach Road, Tansley, Matlock, DE4 5FY. Telephone Number: 01629 583037, Email: info@britishorienteering.org.uk.

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