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Tweet Friday 22nd May 2020

Resumption of orienteering: Phase 1 United Kingdom

Resumption of orienteering: Phase 1 United Kingdom

The updated UK government guidance published on 11 May 2020 permits the resumption of outdoor sports in England where you take part alone, within a household group, or with one person from outside your household from whom you must stay two metres apart at all times.

The updated guidance from the NI Executive published on 18 May 2020 permits Groups of 4 – 6 people who do not share a household can meet outdoors maintaining social distancing.

This will allow us to resume a limited set of individual orienteering activities in these parts of the country, as set out below.

There is no change to the current position in Scotland and Wales, and so orienteering activities in these parts of the UK must remain suspended for now.

As a sport, we must work together to resume orienteering responsibly as and when the relevant government determines it is safe to do so. The Board have committed to following the respective advice of each government, and therefore there are likely to be periods when types of orienteering activities permitted will vary between different parts of the UK, depending on the government guidelines and regulations.

In England and the Isle of Man, we moved to Phase 1 of the resumption of orienteering with effect from 14 May 2020.

In Northern Ireland, we will move to Phase 1 with effect from 22 May 2020.

This will mean that clubs and individuals can:

  • Promote the use of Permanent Orienteering Courses (POCs)
  • Make maps with pre-marked courses available
  • Promote the use of MapRun or Routegadget and other virtual orienteering courses (VOCs),
  • Carry out mapping and planning for future events

The full guidance can be downloaded here.

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Tweet Wednesday 27th May 2020

Interview #3: Training in Lockdown Interview with Fiona Bunn (TVOC / CUOC)

As GB Orienteering Athletes are getting more and more used to the ‘new normal’, British Orienteering asks how lockdown restrictions have impacted on their daily and weekly training routines and drills.

British Orienteering is publishing a series of interviews this week with GB athletes. 

Here is the next interview with GB elite athlete Fiona Bunn member of 
Thames Valley Orienteering Club and Cambridge University Orienteering Club.

Fiona Bunn

Club (National): Thames Valley Orienteering Club / Cambridge University Orienteering Club

Club (International): Sodertalje Nykvarn Orientering (SNO)

Athlete Profile

Garden gym set-up

How have the current restrictions impacted on your training?

Fiona: “It’s impacted on racing plans of course, and as a result I’ve also not been able to do any technical training from where I live, although I think this is not a problem as we are so far out from any races right now. Physical training hasn’t changed too much. It’s sad not to be able to train with a group, but as I am currently rehabbing from an injury I’m in a good position now as I’m able to really take my time on the come back and focus on building slowly and doing all the right exercises. The overall strategy has shifted more into winter training and building a base in the absence of the summer race calendar.

I also can’t do my usual gym sessions but I’ve been adapting at home, and was luckily given a friend’s old barbell at the start of lockdown which gives lots of opportunities!”

 

What advice have you got for other athletes or members in a similar position?

Fiona: “Use this time to work on your weaknesses, or make your strengths into super strengths! Whilst it’s important to form a good routine, it’s also good to experiment with a few new exercises/session styles to try to mix things up and keep a new stimulus! There’s loads of resources on the internet being released. I know some people who are using lockdown as a long experiment to try out a different type of training and see how their body responds, without the pressure of having upcoming races.

Also try to keep in touch with training partners and motivate each other. We’ve been doing Virtual circuits with the Cambridge running club, and a Fantasy league style series with different challenges every few weeks such as different distance races and a 100m elevation challenge for example.”

What is your number one Lockdown training session?

Fiona: “I’m not currently doing any speedwork due to my injury rehab, but I’ve been enjoying running around a marshy field to keep the terrain work going and hopefully come back a more robust athlete with stronger ankles! I’ve also enjoyed the Lockdown orienteering competitions online.”

 

Have you still been able to access support from your coach or orienteering athlete friends, and if so how?

Fiona: “I keep in email contact with my coach usually anyway so not too much has changed there. I’m also hoping to join in with an SNO training camp from afar, along with some of their other international runners in lockdown. I think Skype yoga is on the list which could be interesting.”

 

What box sets have you been able to catch up on during Lockdown?

Fiona: “Boringly not much, I’m still nice and busy with revision for Finals at Uni! I’m enjoying the repeats of Outnumbered on TV though.”

 

Have you been doing any DIY tasks – anything you want to tell us about

Fiona: “Again not much! We’re starting a veg patch with the prospect of actually being at home for long enough over summer to look after it, but that’s it.”

 

Anything else you wish to share on any other aspects of Lockdown training?

Fiona: “Now is a good time to use some creativity and plan for the future! Whether it is making a bank of future training/armchair planned courses, creating new maps for example see the UK Elite Orienteering league competition, new online resources such as all the fantastic new websites being developed by the Lockdown Orienteering challenge or just reflecting on previous performances and writing down some aims for the future or coming up with new exercises to train different skills. I’m excited to see what new ideas we emerge from lockdown with, and also excited to enjoy coming back to races with a new founded appreciation!”

Steep hill climb before lockdown

Thank you Fiona. We wish you all the best with your studying and on-going training.

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As a sport, we must work together to resume orienteering responsibly as and when the relevant government determines it is safe to do so.

The Board of Directors at British Orienteering have committed to following the respective advice of each government, and therefore there are likely to be periods when types of orienteering activities permitted, vary between different parts of the UK, depending on the government guidelines and regulations.

The latest statement from British Orienteering can be found here.
Resumption of Orienteering

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Tweet Wednesday 27th May 2020

Interview #2: Training in Lockdown Interview with Jo Shepherd (INVOC)

As GB Orienteering Athletes are getting more and more used to the ‘new normal’, British Orienteering asks how lockdown restrictions have impacted on their daily and weekly training routines and drills.

British Orienteering is publishing a series of interviews this week with GB athletes. 

Here is an interview with Jo Shepherd of Inverness Orienteering Club.

Jo Shepherd

National Club: Inverness Orienteering Club (INVOC)

International Club: Halden SK 

Athlete Profile

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Jo indoor training

How have the current restrictions impacted on your training?
“I am fortunate to live in Norway where the restrictions have not been as harsh as in the UK, so I am still able to train outside more than once per day and drive within the local area to go orienteering on different maps. My club Halden SK has adapted well and we have had more than 20 training courses available so far that members can print at home and go to in their own time, including some "races" where we send in our GPS tracks to compare routes and times. Training with a few others is allowed so I have been doing intervals together with my clubmate Svetlana Mironova, which helps a lot with motivation. The restrictions have also meant that I am working from home and working reduced hours which has given me more time and flexibility for training and recovery.”

 

What advice have you got for other athletes or members in a similar position?

“Try to focus on the opportunities available in your particular situation rather than dwelling on the negatives. Perhaps you have some Strava segments nearby that could motivate you for a high-intensity session? Maybe now is the chance to try out some visualisation techniques? Can you work on your core and ankle stability so that you are less susceptible to injury and niggles when you return to racing?”

 

What is your number one Lockdown training session?

“My top indoor session is based on a 75min Youtube video of our club strength training that was made last year. Even though its super-tough, being able to see and hear my friends in the video with the familiar playlist and exercises makes it feel a bit like training with them again. Perhaps your club could do something similar, even with live online strength sessions, that can help you connect and motivate each other? I've also tried filling some rucksacks with heavy books and water bottles to wear while doing some of my usual gym exercises like bulgarian squats and step ups.”

 

Have you still been able to access support from your coach or orienteering athlete friends, and if so how?

“Yes it's possible to stay in touch through phone calls and video chat and our new club coach has also been emailing some feedback about my technical trainings based on the GPS routes I've sent him. We've also had a couple of online group catch-ups within the GB team to share advice and ideas which have been good.”


What box sets have you been able to catch up on during Lockdown?

“I'm not really into that but I've watched some short films about trail running and mountain sports for inspiration.”

 

Have you been doing any DIY tasks – anything you want to tell us about?

“One of the first things I did was fix my bike so that I had a back-up for getting to the further-away training maps in case driving was forbidden.”

 

Anything else you wish to share on any other aspects of Lockdown training?
“Take care.”

 

Thanks Jo.  It is great to hear from you.  Such motivational and inspiring advice. Thank you!  Some great ideas too.  We wish you all the best with your on-going training.

 

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As a sport, we must work together to resume orienteering responsibly as and when the relevant government determines it is safe to do so.

The Board of Directors at British Orienteering have committed to following the respective advice of each government, and therefore there are likely to be periods when types of orienteering activities permitted, vary between different parts of the UK, depending on the government guidelines and regulations.

The latest statement from British Orienteering can be found here.
Resumption of Orienteering

Have you still been able to access support from your coach or orienteering athlete friends, and if so how?
Jo:  “Yes it's possible to stay in touch through phone calls and video chat and our new club coach has also been emailing some feedback about my technical trainings based on the GPS routes I've sent him. We've also had a couple of online group catch-ups within the GB team to share advice and ideas which have been good.”


What box sets have you been able to catch up on during Lockdown?
Jo:  “I'm not really into that but I've watched some short films about trail running and mountain sports for inspiration.”

 

Have you been doing any DIY tasks – anything you want to tell us about?
Jo:  “One of the first things I did was fix my bike so that I had a back-up for getting to the further-away training maps in case driving was forbidden.”

 

Anything else you wish to share on any other aspects of Lockdown training?
Jo:  “Take care.”

Thanks Jo.  Great to hear from you.  Such motivational and inspiring advice.  Thank you!  Some great ideas too.

We wish you all best with your on-going training.

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As a sport, we must work together to resume orienteering responsibly as and when the relevant government determines it is safe to do so.

The Board of Directors at British Orienteering have committed to following the respective advice of each government, and therefore there are likely to be periods when types of orienteering activities permitted, vary between different parts of the UK, depending on the government guidelines and regulations.

The latest statement from British Orienteering can be found here.
Resumption of Orienteering

Jo Shepherd
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Tweet Friday 20th September 2019

British Middle Championships 2019

By Sal Chaffey and Ranald Macdonald, Derwent Valley Orienteers

British Middle Distance Championships
Sunday 15 September 2019
 

Organiser Sal Chaffey from Derwent Valley Orienteers, comments:

Our day for “the Middles” was a foggy one, amidst days of blue autumnal skies. This was certainly true on the Friday, when a small team met at Piece Farm to place the eight temporary stiles on the moor, and on Saturday when the marquee arrived and we set up the arena, cheered by news of Derwent Valley Orienteers' medals at the British Sprint Championships in Loughborough. Again, the Monday and Tuesday after the event provided excellent drying days for the soggy assortment of kites and kit!

However, on Sunday morning you couldn’t see the portaloos from the marquee – it was like being on another planet and I was relieved when the first non-DVO competitors emerged from the mists as I knew that others would surely follow.

Above photo on left:  The Arena on Saturday. Piece Farm (on the left), Lantern Pike (on the right). 

Above photo on right:  The first brave spectators set up tents in the mists of Sunday morning!

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And they did. Some 877 competed on the day, 859 of those on Championship courses. 

We had about 80 helpers from DVO, most of whom undertook an array of different jobs as the day progressed – thank you all!  Thank you to Viv Macdonald who liaised with the DVO Teams and dealt with road signs, making my job so much easier. Mike Godfree handled entries.  

Thanks also to the Prize-giving Team of Val Johnson and the Duckworth and O’Donnell families who enabled the Hallam family from Piece Farm to be involved. 

Unclaimed medals and maps will be available at DVO’s Regional event at Longshaw on Saturday 26 October. Longshaw is a beautiful National Trust area just 10 miles SW of Sheffield, and the event is part of the East Midlands League.

It’s been great to be part of an event of this scale, and it certainly makes you appreciate the efforts put on behind the scenes by other clubs and by staff at British Orienteering. We are privileged to be part of a sport in which there’s always room to learn, and where age is no barrier in participation, shown by our competitors, who ranged from 8 to 88!

Planner Ranald Macdonald, Derwent Valley Orienteers, comments:

Scheduling the British Middles in the first half of September is always going to limit the areas a club like DVO can use because the undergrowth is at its worst. However, we do have a couple of upland areas that are more suitable. The first we looked at was deemed unsuitable for the level of event and we have subsequently had significant access issues with that area. We had only used Chinley Churn a few times since its initial mapping in 2015 and, whilst it also has limitations, it seemed worthy of consideration.

The area comprises tiered quarry workings and steep scree/boulder fields on the eastern side, marshy moorland on the top and then fields sloping down to the west and the assembly area on Piece Farm. The area is divided up by uncrossable walls and fences meaning that we had to construct eight stiles to provide reasonable straight line routes or to avoid stiles on public rights of way that could be busy on an early autumn Sunday as it’s a very popular walking area.

I had never planned a championship/level A event before and was really only third or fourth choice as other potential planners were too busy in their work or were injured. The whole exercise was therefore a very steep learning curve for me, though greatly assisted by the ever-patient Chris Burden (AIRE), my Controller.

The Finish was largely determined by the area chosen for Assembly and car parking. It provided a good arena with visible final controls across the skyline and downhill to the Finish.

Finally, some thank yous:

  • To Sal and her assistant, Viv, for a very well organised event
  • To the DVO teams who once again rallied round in large numbers to ensure the event ran smoothly
  • To Chris Burden for his help, advice and support when needed – I learned a lot about planning and controlling from Chris
  • To Paul Addison and Dave Chaffey for their help in various ways, not least control hanging and waking up, and supporting Stuart Swalwell when dealing with the injured competitor
  • To the small army of stile installers on the Friday before the event, helped by the farmer who transported six of them to the top of the area
  • To Mike Godfree for administering entries and map printing and constructed the stiles as well as managing the Download team.
  • To Richard Parkin, for his excellent map and forbearance when we asked for even more map changes
  • To Andy Yeates (WCH), BOF Major Events Consultant, for his support and advice on all aspects of the event.
  • And of course, to the landowners, Henry and Jason Hallam for allowing us to park at Piece Farm and run on their land, Judge George Needham and George and Steven Wainright for letting us use their land as our temporary stadium. Without their help we could not compete. Jason Hallam, in particular, couldn’t do enough to help and he and his wife, Beth, seemed to be delighted to be asked to do the Prize Giving, along with Amanda Roberts, EMOA Chair.
  • And finally to you, the competitors, all 877 of you, who made the effort over the last two years all worthwhile, not least with your positive and constructive comments.

Photo credits:  Steve Rush (BOK)

Final results can be found here.

Results, as well as WinSplits and Routegadget, are here.

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Event officials
Organiser: Sal Chaffey assisted by Viv Macdonald, both DVO
Planner: Ranald Macdonald assisted by Dave Chaffey, both DVO
Controller: Chris Burden, Aire
Mapper: Richard Parkin, DVO
 

British Orienteering would like to take this opportunity to say thank you to the Organiser Sal Chaffey and all event officials, to Derwent Valley Orienteers and surrounding clubs for all their hard work and behind the scenes activities in making this a great British Middle Championships.

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