News

News

Latest news

Tweet Sunday 20th October 2019

China, last stop of the 2019 Orienteering World Cup

Report by International Orienteering Federation.

Five things you may not know. 


After the third round of the Orienteering World Cup in Switzerland, it is time to focus on the Final Round, which is always an exciting event as the winners of the season are finally decided and goals for next year start to appear.

However, this time there’s another thrilling point: the World Cup is visiting China from 26th to 29th October. Guangdong Province will host the first IOF Major Event with global participants, as well as the first World Cup organised in the country. With three races: a , Middle distance, a  Sprint Relay and the final Sprint, China wants to ensure a weekend of top level competition while promoting our sport among its population.

Here there are a few interesting facts you may not know about the Orienteering World Cup Final Round and Chinese Orienteering:

1.  Middle distance terrain: a tough mix of park and forest!

The first race of the three is the Middle Distance, a race which will be determined in unusual terrain. Not a typical European Middle Distance terrain for sure, the venue is a mix of forest and park, but this will still be a tough challenge for the athletes.

2.  Did you know about these historical China’s national team results at WOC?

Even though Chinese athletes are not now among the favourites to win a medal, some historical results must be highlighted regarding their performance at Major Events: at WOC 2008 the women’s team achieved the 7th place in the Relay, and in 2009, Shuangyan Hao took a 10th place in the women’s Sprint race. Recent results indicate that the Chinese team is moving up again and it will be interesting to see if they can provide some surprises on home ground.

3.  The World Cup visits another continent!

Since the World Cup 2015 Round 1 in Australia, all World Cup Rounds have been celebrated in Europe, so this is the first time in 4 years it is visiting a different continent! However, Major Events will soon return to Asia, as Japan is organizing the World Masters Orienteering Championships 2021. Asia now also has a regular schedule of Asian Championships and the number of World Ranking Events is steadily growing.

4.  Orienteering promotion in China is not only about this World Cup!

In 2017, IOF President, Leho Haldna, and CEO, Tom Hollowell visited China to ensure the World Cup Final Round 2019 and reach an agreement for a long-term plan to develop orienteering in the most populated country of the world. Helping to improve the level of their top orienteers, working to build a strong base and bringing more Major Events to the country are the pillars to promote orienteering in China.

5.  Chinese Time Zone, don’t miss out on the competitions!

When following an international event, it is essential to know what the local time  is to avoid missing the fight for the medals. Therefore, China’s time zone is UTC+8 (in the whole country!) The weekend of the World Cup is especially challenging since Europe goes from Summer to Normal time at 04:00 in the night between 26 and 27 October.  

PLEASE REMEMBER: THE CLOCKS CHANGE ON THE NIGHT OF SATURDAY 26 OCTOBER 2019 AT MID-NIGHT IN THE UK.

Get set to watch the Web-TV Broadcasts

As usually, IOF Live Services will be available to follow the last stop of World Cup. On LIVE Orienteering, we will find start lists, the TV broadcast from the Opening Ceremony and all the races, GPS tracking… and anything you may need to be informed!

The Programme for Competition is as follows:

Opening Ceremony

25 October (Friday)
13:00-15:00 (CEST, UTC +2)
19:00-21:00 (China)
Free

Middle

26 October (Saturday)
08:00-11:00 (CEST UTC +2)
14:00-17:00 (China)
Ticket needed

Sprint Relay

27 October (Sunday)
07:30-09:00 (CET UTC +1)
15:30-17:00 (China)
Ticket needed

Rest Day

28 October (Monday)

Sprint

29 October (Tuesday)
07:00-09:30 (CET UTC +1))
15:00-17:30 (China)
Ticket needed

 

Wishing the GB team all the very best in their final preparations as they get ready to travel to compete.

 

Top
Tweet Saturday 19th October 2019

TrailO Bukowa Cup, Poland PreO and TempO

Ten GBR based trail orienteers travelled to Sczcecin in NW Poland for the Bukowa Cup in both the WRE in TrailO and also a FootO competition, including two new faces, making a satisfactory debut in the International TrailO scene, Andrew Stemp and David Jukes.

In the TrailO, the best GB performers were Charles Bromley Gardner (BAOC), 3rd in the PreO, 6th in TempO & Tom Dobra (BOK) 8th in TempO, 10th in PreO.

Not all the group also ran in the FootO competition, but some of those who did achieved remarkable success, with Ruth Rhodes winning W75, Ian Ditchfield M60, Charles Bromley Gardner M55, Andrew Stemp and Tom Dobra coming 3rd and 4th respectively in M21 and David Jukes winning the M65 Sprint race.

This concludes the series of European TrailO Cup and TrailO World Ranking Events for 2019 and we now await the fixture list for the 2020 season.

Full results can be found here

Ten GBR Trail Orienteers travelled to compete in Poland 
Top
Tweet Thursday 17th October 2019

New Forest Junior Camp – Last Remaining Places

Burley YHA, New Forest, Hampshire

Friday 1 - Sunday 3 November 2019

A few remaining places are available for the New Forest Junior Camp in early November.

Organised alongside the November Classic weekend, this offers juniors aged 11-13 years at Yellow or Orange level a chance meet other juniors, improve their orienteering skills and have some fun.

More information available at: www.britishorienteering.org.uk/newforestjuniorcamp
and entries via: www.fabian4.org.uk

New Forest Junior Camp
Top
Tweet Wednesday 9th October 2019

Boost for public health with new running trails open in the nation’s forests

Forestry England has launched new waymarked running trails in 18 forests around the country. From 1km running routes right up to 10km, the new trails have been designed with both beginners and seasoned runners in mind. They provide an opportunity to run on safe, off-road, traffic-free trails in beautiful forest locations.

200km of mixed terrain trails have been created this year, supported by Sport England using funds raised by players of the National Lottery. Sport England and Forestry England are working together to offer people of all abilities even more opportunities to be active in forests.

Trudi Else, Strategic Lead at Sport England, said:  

“More people than ever before are getting active by walking and running. Providing fun and practical ways for everyone to start or continue running and waking will be critical if we are to continue to boost the nation’s activity levels.

That’s why Sport England is proud to be working with Forestry England and investing National Lottery funding into developing a fantastic network of marked trails. By making running and walking through the forest more accessible many more families, friends and communities will feel confident to hit the trails, enjoy nature and benefit from being active outdoors.”
 

Rachel Tallon, Active Forests Programme Manager at Forestry England, said: 

"We have lots of visitors who would like to run in our forests but are not familiar enough with our trails or worry about getting lost. The new waymarked trails remove all those concerns so that runners can just enjoy the benefits of being in the forest; fresh air, wildlife, spectacular views and escape the stresses of life.

The different distances on offer are also a great way to build up endurance and to progress from 1k to being able to run 5k or 10k routes.”

 

Alex Lines is a regular runner on the new routes at Bedgebury National Pinetum and said: 

“It's easily accessible, you just follow the signs until you're back where you started; simple! It's also a standard distance, and as such, you can repeat it whenever you like and time yourself to track progress.”


More information about all the new waymarked running trails can be found at forestryengland.uk/running.

You can also join Forestry England’s Strava club to see how others have got on across England.

Here is a flavour of what you can expect at some of Forestry England’s new off-road trails:

 

Bedgebury National Pinetum and Forest, Kent

Route: National Pinetum

Distance: 3k

Highlights: A stunning route through the National Pinetum, where you will run past impressive conifers and picturesque lakes.

Terrain: All-weather tarmac and gravel paths.

Challenges: With a mixture of gentle downhills, and short inclines this route offers a great introduction to trail running.

-----

Alice Holt, Surrey

Route: Alice Holt 3k

Distance: 3k

Highlights: Gorgeous variations of tree species and multiple deer spotted regularly.

Terrain: Mixed; forest roads, trails, muddy in parts.

Challenges: Dragon Hill (check it out on Strava!).

-----

Whinlatter Forest, Cumbria

Route: Whinlatter 5k

Distance: 5k

Highlights: Amazing Douglas fir trees, stunning views of the Lake District National Park and Grizedale Pike and the opportunity to spot wildlife including red squirrels and osprey.

Terrain: Forest road with one short section of path.

Challenges: A long climb up that takes in 210 meters of mountain ascent.

-----

Haldon Forest Park, Devon

Route: Haldon Challenge and running route

Distance: 5k

Highlights: A lovely mixture of scenery; you get to run through the butterfly conservation area and a magical tree tunnel.

Terrain: Mixed; surface path, gravel and grass.

Challenges: Mixed terrains, steep gradients, ups and downs.

-----

Dalby Forest, North Yorkshire

Route: Staindale Lake

Distance: 10k

Highlights: A beautiful tree tunnel and magical views across the North York Moors National Park and Langdale.

Terrain: Mixed; stoned road, footpath and grass.

Challenges: Mixed terrain and steady climb to the viewpoint.

-----

Cannock Chase Forest, Staffordshire

Route: Cannock 10k

Distance: 10k

Highlights: The stunning Fairoak pools and model railway crossing.

Terrain: Mixed; flat, well-surfaced trails and rougher, looser forest tracks.

Challenges: A long challenging climb (over 1km) and testing terrain.

-----

Sherwood Pines, Nottinghamshire

Route: Sherwood 5k

Distance: 5k

Highlights: Mighty trees, enjoyable winding path, dense forest and wildlife.

Terrain: Mostly forest trail.

Challenges: With only slight undulations throughout the trail it is great for beginners.

-----

Salcey Forest, Northamptonshire

Route: Salcey 5k

Distance: 5km

Highlights: Fast, flat, off-road surfaces will lead you through the picturesque autumnal colours created by the wide variety of tree species in the ancient woodland of Salcey. Whilst winding your way through the course you may catch a glimpse of the Druids Oaks believed to be around 400 years old.

Terrain: Mixed; a combination of forest road and surfaced trails.

Challenges: With the flat terrain the biggest challenge here is your own; can you beat your best time?

------

Wyre Forest, Worcestershire

Route: Wyre Forest 5km

Distance: 5km

Highlights: Beautiful mix of forest views; through the oak and beech trees, you may spot some deer.

Terrain: Well surface forest roads, wide solid paths

Challenges: A number of steep gradients up and down with a steady uphill climb of around 200 metres to the finish.

Forestry England manages and cares for the nation’s 1,500 woods and forests, welcoming 230 million visits per year. As England’s largest land manager, we shape landscapes and are enhancing forests for people to enjoy, wildlife to flourish and businesses to grow. For more information visit forestryengland.uk. Forestry England is an agency of the Forestry Commission.

 

Top