News

News

Latest news

Tweet Friday 22nd May 2020

Resumption of orienteering: Phase 1 United Kingdom

Resumption of orienteering: Phase 1 United Kingdom

The updated UK government guidance published on 11 May 2020 permits the resumption of outdoor sports in England where you take part alone, within a household group, or with one person from outside your household from whom you must stay two metres apart at all times.

The updated guidance from the NI Executive published on 18 May 2020 permits Groups of 4 – 6 people who do not share a household can meet outdoors maintaining social distancing.

This will allow us to resume a limited set of individual orienteering activities in these parts of the country, as set out below.

There is no change to the current position in Scotland and Wales, and so orienteering activities in these parts of the UK must remain suspended for now.

As a sport, we must work together to resume orienteering responsibly as and when the relevant government determines it is safe to do so. The Board have committed to following the respective advice of each government, and therefore there are likely to be periods when types of orienteering activities permitted will vary between different parts of the UK, depending on the government guidelines and regulations.

In England and the Isle of Man, we moved to Phase 1 of the resumption of orienteering with effect from 14 May 2020.

In Northern Ireland, we will move to Phase 1 with effect from 22 May 2020.

This will mean that clubs and individuals can:

  • Promote the use of Permanent Orienteering Courses (POCs)
  • Make maps with pre-marked courses available
  • Promote the use of MapRun or Routegadget and other virtual orienteering courses (VOCs),
  • Carry out mapping and planning for future events

The full guidance can be downloaded here.

Top
Tweet Wednesday 27th May 2020

Interview #2: Training in Lockdown Interview with Jo Shepherd (INVOC)

As GB Orienteering Athletes are getting more and more used to the ‘new normal’, British Orienteering asks how lockdown restrictions have impacted on their daily and weekly training routines and drills.

British Orienteering is publishing a series of interviews this week with GB athletes. 

Here is an interview with Jo Shepherd of Inverness Orienteering Club.

Jo Shepherd

Clubs: Halden SK (International) and Inverness Orienteering Club (National UK)

Athlete Profile

-----

How have the current restrictions impacted on your training?
Jo:  “I am fortunate to live in Norway where the restrictions have not been as harsh as in the UK, so I am still able to train outside more than once per day and drive within the local area to go orienteering on different maps. My club Halden SK has adapted well and we have had more than 20 training courses available so far that members can print at home and go to in their own time, including some "races" where we send in our GPS tracks to compare routes and times. Training with a few others is allowed so I have been doing intervals together with my clubmate Svetlana Mironova, which helps a lot with motivation. The restrictions have also meant that I am working from home and working reduced hours which has given me more time and flexibility for training and recovery.”

 

What advice have you got for other athletes or members in a similar position?
Jo:  “Try to focus on the opportunities available in your particular situation rather than dwelling on the negatives. Perhaps you have some Strava segments nearby that could motivate you for a high-intensity session? Maybe now is the chance to try out some visualisation techniques? Can you work on your core and ankle stability so that you are less susceptible to injury and niggles when you return to racing?”

Jo indoor core training

What is your number one Lockdown training session?
Jo:  “My top indoor session is based on a 75min Youtube video of our club strength training that was made last year. Even though its super-tough, being able to see and hear my friends in the video with the familiar playlist and exercises makes it feel a bit like training with them again. Perhaps your club could do something similar, even with live online strength sessions, that can help you connect and motivate each other? I've also tried filling some rucksacks with heavy books and water bottles to wear while doing some of my usual gym exercises like bulgarian squats and step ups.”

 

Have you still been able to access support from your coach or orienteering athlete friends, and if so how?
Jo:  “Yes it's possible to stay in touch through phone calls and video chat and our new club coach has also been emailing some feedback about my technical trainings based on the GPS routes I've sent him. We've also had a couple of online group catch-ups within the GB team to share advice and ideas which have been good.”


What box sets have you been able to catch up on during Lockdown?
Jo:  “I'm not really into that but I've watched some short films about trail running and mountain sports for inspiration.”

 

Have you been doing any DIY tasks – anything you want to tell us about?
Jo:  “One of the first things I did was fix my bike so that I had a back-up for getting to the further-away training maps in case driving was forbidden.”

 

Anything else you wish to share on any other aspects of Lockdown training?
Jo:  “Take care.”

 

Thanks Jo. Great to hear from you. Such motivational and inspiring advice. Thank you! Some great ideas too. We wish you all best with your on-going training.

 

-----

As a sport, we must work together to resume orienteering responsibly as and when the relevant government determines it is safe to do so.

The Board of Directors at British Orienteering have committed to following the respective advice of each government, and therefore there are likely to be periods when types of orienteering activities permitted, vary between different parts of the UK, depending on the government guidelines and regulations.

The latest statement from British Orienteering can be found here.
Resumption of Orienteering

Jo Shepherd
Top
Tweet Tuesday 26th May 2020

Interview #1: Training in Lockdown with Alastair Thomas (EUOC/WCOC)

Another week passes and as GB Orienteering Athletes are getting more and more used to the ‘new normal’, British Orienteering asks how lockdown restrictions have impacted on their daily and weekly training routines and drills.

British Orienteering will be publishing a series of interviews this week with GB athletes. 

Here is the first interview with Alastair Thomas member of both Edinburgh University and West Cumberland Orienteering Clubs.

Alastair Thomas

Edinburgh University Orienteering Club (EUOC) and West Cumberland Orienteering Club (WCOC)

Athlete Profile

Alastair Thomas garden training during lockdown

How have the current restrictions impacted on your training?
"The amount of training I’m doing is pretty similar to before and actually being in lockdown all day just means more time for rest and recovery, so the training I am doing is generally higher quality than before."

"The obvious big change is that all the races have been cancelled, so instead of being in the midst of the domestic racing season we are now in some weird limbo phase where we don’t really know when/where we’ll next get to race. Whilst I’m obviously pretty gutted that I’m not getting to race, I’ve started to realise that I enjoy the training just as much as the racing, and having a big competition goal wasn’t the only thing that was getting me out the door every day to go training. As such, I’ve been able to continue the same training as before the lockdown and the season postponement without too many issues regarding lack of motivation."

What advice have you got for other athletes or members in a similar position?
"Just get into a good routine, know when you’re going to go out for your daily exercise."

What is your number one lockdown training session?
"Just the easy running miles."

Have you still been able to access support from your coach or orienteering athlete friends, and if so how?
"Yes, I’ve had a couple of online meetings with my coach, Mark Nixon via video-call which has been nice, basically just to make sure I know what I’m doing and I’ve not been sitting here doing nothing! And I’ve got the opportunity to join in with EUOC core sessions 3 times a week via zoom."

Alastair at the Junior World Orienteering Championships 2019

What box sets have you been able to catch up on during lockdown?
"I started watching Peaky Blinders last week and I’ve finished all five series now, so that’s kept me well entertained, top series would recommend."

Have you been doing any DIY tasks – anything you want to tell us about?
"I’ve been helping out in the garden a bit although my mum would say not nearly enough! I have been doing some lawn mowing, digging out the flower beds etc. I’ve actually really enjoyed it, takes me back to summer holidays when I was younger when I didn’t spend my whole summer off on orienteering camps."

Anything else you wish to share on any other aspects of Lockdown training?
"Being stuck at home the temptation to eat everything in the kitchen has been a bit of a problem… I need to be socially isolated from the fridge!  Apart from that, I think being in lockdown has sort of been what being a professional athlete is like; just training and then chilling at home."


Thanks, Alastair. British Orienteering wishes you all the very best with your on-going training.

 

-----

As a sport, we must work together to resume orienteering responsibly as and when the relevant government determines it is safe to do so.

The Board of Directors at British Orienteering have committed to following the respective advice of each government, and therefore there are likely to be periods when types of orienteering activities permitted, vary between different parts of the UK, depending on the government guidelines and regulations.

The latest statement from British Orienteering can be found here.
Resumption of Orienteering

Competing in the Junior World Orienteering Championships 2019
Top
Tweet Thursday 13th February 2020

This Girl Can - Sport England Funding Opportunity

Do you have a project idea?  Looking for funding? Then the Sport England This Girl Can Community Fund could be for you. 

The fund aims to support women aged 16+ to get active by offering National Lottery grants to local projects that will contribute to overcoming the barrier some women face in getting active. 

Projects could need just a few hundred pounds to larger project nearer £10,000 so there are some great possibilities.  

Orienteering clubs are ideally placed to take advantage of this fund to bring in valuable funds in support of important projects. Project ideas could include: 

  • Organising a series of orienteering themed walks for new mums.

  • Running a series of evening or weekend activities which helps train women in the skills of orienteering as well as getting the benefit of physical activity.

  • Providing specialist coaching sessions for 16+ girls who sit outside the elite and regional squads framework.

Funding opportunity
  • Introducing a series of short evening score events for women that link to women networks in your area.

  • Providing an orienteering activity specifically to encourage women to try orienteering and then linking to an existing summer event series you / your club has planned. 

These are just some ideas and suggestions on how you could get involved.  This is an excellent opportunity which could really help you get that idea you’ve been thinking of for a while now off the ground.

There is a short Sport England Project Form which initially needs to be completed explaining your idea.  Once this form has been submitted Sport England funding advisers will be in touch with you within 8 weeks. If your idea is successful then you will be asked to complete a full application form with more details.

British Orienteering’s Development Team are available to help and talk to clubs about their project ideas and wanting to submit a bid, as well as providing support and assistance when your initial idea has been approved.

The potential for your project idea could be great!   

Please note: that the deadline for submissions is:  25 February 2020. 

For further details and to complete the initial form, follow this link:  https://www.thisgirlcan.co.uk/community-fund/ 

Top