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Tweet Thursday 16th July 2020

Return to Orienteering Guidance for the UK

As a sport, we must work together to resume orienteering responsibly and within the relevant Government guidance.

The Board of Directors have committed to following the respective advice of each government, and therefore there are likely to be periods when types of orienteering activities permitted, vary between different parts of the UK, depending on the Government guidelines and regulations.

British Orienteering has developed a dedicated webpage here

On this webpage the guidance for each of the nations will be updated accordingly as further announcements by local or national Governments are made.

Latest Guidance:

All guidance is subject to any further restrictions that may be imposed by local or national Governments.

England

Full club guidance England 13 July 2020

Wales

Full club guidance Wales 15 July 2020

Northern Ireland

Full club guidance NI 14 July 2020

Scotland

SOA event guidance 15 July 2020

SOA COVID 19 Risk Assessment phase 3

Scottish Orienteering reactivation phase 3

This webpage also includes links to key documents and information to support clubs and participants in delivering safe orienteering and includes the following support resources:

 

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Tweet Friday 7th August 2020

Permanent Orienteering Courses are not just for Newcomers

Permanent Orienteering Courses are one of the first steps on the way to re-starting our sport of orienteering in a socially distanced way. 

Jennie Taylor Communications Officer caught up with Stephen Borrill member of West Anglian Orienteering Club and Volunteer Permanent Orienteering Course Coordinator at his club to find out what is involved in his role and why he enjoys Permanent Orienteering Courses so much. 

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Jennie:  How long have you been Permanent Orienteering Course (POC) Coordinator for your club and what does your volunteer entail?

Stephen Borrill:   "I’ve been the Permanent Orienteering Course Coordinator for West Anglian Orienteering Club (WAOC) for a couple of years now. This volunteer role entails liaising with the landowners for permissions and maintenance, people who may want to sell maps (for example in cafés) and British Orienteering to ensure the list of on the British Orienteering Permanent Orienteering Course database are up to date."

 

JT:  How did you first discover Permanent Orienteering Courses?

Stephen:  "I rediscovered orienteering in my early 30s having done it at school and found out that WAOC was my local club. I re-started orienteering tentatively, but then soon started doing some of the club's summer mid-week events, one of which used the Permanent Orienteering Courses markers at Ferry Meadows, near Peterborough. Before then, the last Permanent Orienteering Course I did was part of a school trip to Normanby Park, Scunthorpe in the mid 80s."

 

JT:  What enticed you initially?

Stephen: "I work away a reasonable amount, so I need to find something to do in the evenings and to avoid just sitting in the pub!  Permanent Orienteering Courses fit the bill perfectly. Many are score courses, so you can set your own rules. Set a time limit if you need to be back to the hotel in time for food. Pick the shortest route to do it as quickly as possible. Get the controls in numerical order if you want to challenge yourself with longer legs."

 

JT:  How do you select which Permanent Orienteering Courses  to do?

Stephen: "Mainly just proximity to where I’m working! On the other hand because I’m doing them in the evening, how easy it is to get the map is very important to me. In general I won’t be able to get to a Visitor Centre during its opening hours. Of 582 Permanent Orienteering Courses uploaded on the British Orienteering site, 289 have downloadable maps. I’m in charge of Permanent Orienteering Courses for West Anglian Orienteering Club and since the lockdown, I’ve managed to get all our landowners to agree to free map downloads. I also apply my general orienteering rule of thumb: "Don’t do an event that takes longer to drive to than it does to run it."
 

JT:  What do you like about doing Permanent Orienteering Courses - exploring? Discovering new places?  Or is it the challenge?

Stephen:  "Permanent Orienteering Courses are a great way to explore new places. Like regular orienteering, you get to see places that you wouldn’t if you were just going for a walk around a country park. When you go for a walk and just wander without a map, you always feel like you’ve missed the best bits. Because you have something to actually look for when doing a Permanent Orienteering Course, it’s more rewarding/distracting, so good for doing with a family. For me, discovering new non-East Anglian countryside is fun and the terrain is often more challenging."


JT:  How many Permanent Orienteering Courses have you done to date?

Stephen: "So far I’ve done 37 from the South Coast up to Humberside, from Gloucestershire across to Kent. In terms of the places where I tend to work away, I’ve done most of the nearby ones. While there are Permanent Orienteering Courses all over the country, some areas, and clubs, have many more than others. In Cambridgeshire we are in one of the most sparse areas along with neighbouring Norfolk and Lincolnshire. By comparison, near Bracknell I once did 5 courses in one evening. To be fair, all 5 only totalled 10.7km and took less than 2 hours including driving between each."

 

JT:  Do you tick them off in a notebook?  Make notes about individual Permanent Orienteering Courses you have completed?

Stephen: "I keep them on a Google map and, of course, I keep the actual maps themselves with the letters I found on the posts and any notes about missing posts, etc. I try to send feedback to the club who’s responsible if posts are missing or vandalised. So far I can remember all the Permanent Orienteering Courses I’ve done, maybe I’ll make notes when my memory starts to fail or if I do too many."

Google map showing all Permanent Orienteering Courses completed.

JT:  Have you got a favourite Permanent Orienteering Course which particularly stands out?

Stephen: "I prefer Permanent Orienteering Courses which present a navigational challenge so are more akin to regular orienteering (of the 582 POCs, 171 say they have Green standard controls). Also, living in East Anglia, hills are always a novelty. Finally, an up-to-date map without lots of missing posts or hidden in waist-high bracken is helpful. Bearing all of these in mind, I think Shorne Woods in Kent, even though when I did it the map was very out of date, I’m pleased to see it has just been updated, Shotover Country Park near Oxford and Crickley Hill Country Park in Gloucestershire are my favourites. I have others which are memorable such as Sherwood Pines where I did 16km before giving up as it was getting dark and Oakley Park near Farnborough which was the complete opposite; a 1:2000 map that was only just over 1km in total."

Map extract from Shorne Woods.  Credit:  Dartford Orienteering Klub

JT:  Are you on a mission to complete all Permanent Orienteering Courses?

Stephen: "I think I’ve quite literally got a long way to go to achieve that! I’m not like a Parkrun tourist, but on the other hand, Permanent Orienteering Courses don’t really stand up to repeat visits. Perhaps with more UK-based staycations, I’ll be able to not just do them when I’m working away."

 

JT:  What is next for Permanent Orienteering Courses in your view?

Stephen: "I’ve been doing quite a lot of MapRun courses. These work well in urban areas or country parks with big, obvious control locations. It’s great that you get results and they’re immediate, but most are not based on proper ISOM maps. I’m developing http://maprun.uk/ as a easy way to find MapRun events along with their maps all over the country as well as offering guidance to newcomers and planners. I think both Permanent Orienteering Courses and MapRun are a great entry point into our sport and should be promoted outside of the usual orienteering channels where you already have a captive audience. The MapRun.uk site can auto-generate event pages, so could save clubs independently reinventing the wheel, but it still allows clubs to add their own details such as parking and the exact start location. 

Standard Permanent Orienteering Courses still provide a more authentic orienteering experience. They have better maps, more challenging courses and something you need to physically find. Combining Permanent Orienteering Courses and MapRun is an obvious next step and it is good to see some clubs doing this. If you define your Permanent Orienteering Club markers in OpenStreetMap, Ollie O’Brien’s OpenOrienteeringMap will soon be able to import this and generate MapRun courses in a couple of clicks."

Can you spot the control in this photograph?

Thank you Stephen.   

Permanent Orienteering Courses are available across the UK. 

Find a course by following five easy steps here.

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Tweet Thursday 6th August 2020

Use Your British Orienteering Membership To Save You Money

Making your British Orienteering Membership Work for You.

Whatever you do this summer make sure you do not miss out on the wide range of discounts and offers available to British Orienteering members.  Save money on national brands, sports and outdoor gear, holiday providers, days out, clothing and shoes, and meals out. 

British Orienteering has one of the most comprehensive membership benefits of any governing body – use your membership to save YOU money. Log-in to the member section on the British Orienteering website with your member details to access all the discount codes.

A list of all the benefits is below:

To access all these money-saving discounts – all you need to do is 'Log in' to the member section of the British Orienteering website to gain access to the unique British Orienteering member discounts codes.

Forgotten how to?

Here's how…follow these six easy steps.

1.  Go to the homepage of the British Orienteering website www.britishorienteering.org.uk

2.  Go to the top right of the homepage and click on the ‘Log in’ button.

3.  Enter in your unique membership details.  If you have forgotten your membership details please use the forgotten password function, if you dont know your membership number or need to update your email address, please contact info@britishorienteering.org.uk  

4.  When logged in, hover over the ‘My Account’ which is at the top right of the page.

5.  Then click on ‘Member Discounts’ underneath the ‘My Membership’ heading on the left-hand side.

6.  You will now see the whole list of member discounts and offers together with the instructions of take-up and the unique British Orienteering member discount and offer codes to use as stated.

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Why not explore some more?

When you are in the ‘My Membership’ section, this is a great opportunity to ensure all of your member contacts details are all up to date and correct on the British Orienteering membership database. 

You can do this by simply clicking on the ‘My Details’ tab.  
If you have any questions, then please do not hesitate to email:  info@britishorienteering.org.uk

If you haven't already, you could also look at what e-newsletters are available and update your ‘Newsletter Settings’ to ensure that you are receiving all the latest member news and information.  If you have a spare bit of time you can even read through the archive editions of British Orienteering's Focus magazine, as well as checking that you are up to speed with all of the recent member e-newsletters as issued. 

We would love to hear of any ideas or suggestions of specific topics you think would be interesting for other British Orienteering members either to be shared on the British Orienteering website in the news section or in the member's e-newsletters.  Email:  jtaylor@britishorienteering.org.uk

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Tweet Tuesday 17th March 2020

COVID19 Update - All Orienteering Activities Suspended

It is with great sadness that we are now in a position where all orienteering activities in the UK have to be suspended with immediate effect.

We are aware that the Coranvirus outbreak is a very fluid and rapidly changing situation. We all, therefore, continue to follow advice from the Public Health England, the World Health Organisation and both local and national governments on this matter and will keep the orienteering community updated as appropriate.

We know how great the sport is at supporting each other and we ask that you continue to pull together (albeit virtually) during this difficult time.  We will do our best to get you back into the forests as soon as it is safe to do so.

Finally, we ask that you continue to follow the government's guidance on how to prevent the spread of Coronavirus.  Please stay safe and support each other during this hard time.

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