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Tweet Wednesday 11th December 2019

Children’s activity levels on the rise - Sport England Active Lives Survey

Source:  Sport England Press Release 

Children's activity levels on the rise

  • Almost half of children in England now take part in an average of 60 minutes of physical activity a day – up 3.6% from last year.
  • The rise is driven by more children getting active outside of school – 57.2% of children and young people do an average of 30 minutes or more a day outside of school, compared to 40.4% at school.
  • Significant inequalities remain in the areas of family affluence, gender and race.
Children's activity levels on the rise

This finding comes from Sport England’s ‘Active Lives Children and Young People’ report into the activity levels of the nation’s children and means that 3.3 million children are now meeting the new recommended Chief Medical Officer Guidelines - 279,600 more children than last year.

Government guidelines recommend that children and young people should get 30 minutes of their daily physical activity in the school day and 30 minutes outside of school. The figures show that there has been a rise in children getting active outside of school over the last year, with 57% (up 4.6%) doing an average of 30 minutes or more a day outside of school, compared to 40% at school.

As part of our 2016-21 strategy Towards an Active Nation, Sport England is already investing £194m in children and young people, within its remit of responsibility for sport and physical activity outside of school from the age of 5.

Activities outside of school that are on the rise include active play, team sports and walking.

At the other end of the scale, 2.1 million children and young people (29.0%) are doing less than 30 minutes of physical activity a day, and while that number is decreasing (by 3.9% over the last year) it is a reminder of how much more needs to be done. In the middle, another 1.7 million (24.2%) children are ‘fairly active’ taking part in average of 30-59 minutes a day.

The inequalities that were surfaced by the first report last year remain, with children from the most affluent families more active (54%) compared to the least affluent families (42%) while boys are more active than girls at every age from five up.

The survey also shows that active children are happier, more resilient and more trusting of others and it has also shown a positive association between being active and higher levels of mental wellbeing, individual development and community development.

Active Lives Children and Young People provides the most comprehensive overview of the sport and physical activity habits of children in England. It looks at the number of children taking part in a wide range of sport and physical activities (ranging from dance and scooting to active play and team sports) at moderate intensity, both at school and out of school. The report is based on responses from over 130,000 children aged 5-16 in England during the academic year 2018/2019, making it the largest study of its kind.

ACTIVITY SETTING – AT SCHOOL VS OUT OF SCHOOL

  • There is a difference in the amount of sport and physical activity that takes place at school, compared to activity levels outside of school – 40.4% of children are active at school for an average of 30 minutes per day while 57.2% of children are active outside of school for the same duration – an increase of 4.6% on last year.
  • At school, increases have been seen for years 3-6 (ages 7-11) - however secondary school age young people have seen no change and the youngest children (years 1-2) have seen a decrease. This is seen across boys and girls.

The report also shows that significant inequalities remain when looking at children’s activity levels:

FAMILY AFFLUENCE

  • While there have been increases in activity levels across all levels of family affluence, children and young people from families who are less affluent are still least likely to be active (42% of children in this group are active for an average of 60 minutes+ a day, compared to 54% of children and young people from families of high affluence).
  • They are also least likely to enjoy being active – 43% of children from low affluence families say they enjoy being active vs 59% from high affluent families (a 16% gap).
  • Boys from the least affluent families are more likely to be active than girls.

GENDER

  • While there have been increases in both boys and girls’ activity levels, boys are more likely to be active then girls with a gap of 319,200 between the numbers of boys who achieve the recommended amount of sport and physical activity (51% or 1.8m) and the number of girls that do (43% or 1.5m).
  • In years 9-11 (ages 13-16) there has only been an increase in activity levels for girls, and not boys, with an increase of 3.5% (29,800 number) doing an average of 60+ minutes a day.

ETHNICITY

  • Asian and black children are most likely to do less than an average of 30 minutes activity a day.

Other interesting points to note are:

AGE

  • How positively children and young people feel about sport and physical activity generally declines with age.
  • Activity levels peak when children are aged 5-7, and again at the end of primary school (age 11-12). Children are more likely to be active at these points than at any other time during their primary or secondary education. Children and young people aged 13-16 (years 9-11) are the least likely to be active.
  • There are more active children than less active children across all age groups.

TYPE OF ACTIVITY

  • Active play and informal activities remain the most common way for children in younger age groups (Years 1-6) to be active.
  • Team sports become more common as children get older. By secondary school age, team sports are the most common group of activities.

MENTAL WELLBEING BENEFITS

  • Active children and young people are more likely to report higher levels of mental wellbeing.

ATTITUDES TO SPORT AND ACTIVITY

  • The first Active Lives Children and Young People survey showed that enjoyment above all other elements of physical literacy is the biggest driver of children’s activity levels.
  • The new survey shows that girls are less likely to enjoy being active than boys with the biggest gap between the genders found around confidence and enjoyment.
  • More physically literate children are more likely to be active.
  • More physically literate children are happier, more resilient and more trusting of others.
  • The number of positive attitudes is the key driver of how active children are.

The full Active Lives Children and Young People report is available here

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Tweet Monday 9th December 2019

Graham Patten has resigned from the Board of Directors

British Orienteering announces today that Graham Patten has resigned from the Board of Directors.

Graham’s resignation is due to personal reasons and increased business commitments. Graham has resigned with regret and wishes British Orienteering and the Board all the best for the future.

Chair of the Board, Drew Vanbeck stated: "On behalf of the Board of Directors and of British Orienteering, I extend our sincere appreciation to Graham for his contribution to the sport and personally I look forward to continuing to have the benefit of Graham's wise counsel.”

Drew added, “We are in the process of searching for individuals who can fill the vacancy created by Graham’s resignation and that of Judith Holt who is due to step down from the Board at the next AGM after serving the full 9-year maximum as a director. If you are interested or know of someone who is prepared to volunteer and help British Orienteering develop and advance its strategic agenda please do not hesitate to contact me or the Chief Executive Peter Hart."

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Tweet Thursday 5th December 2019

2020 World Orienteering Day / Week - Save The Date!

The next World Orienteering Day will take place on Wednesday 13 May 2020.  

In 2020, between Wednesday 13 May and Tuesday 19 May 2020, any activity held can be registered as a World Orienteering Day event.

Vision

The International Orienteering Federation´s goals regarding the organisation of this annual event are as follows:

  • Increasing the visibility and accessibility of orienteering to young people,
  • Increasing the number of participants both in the schools’ activities, as well and in the clubs’ activities in all countries of National Federations,
  • Helping teachers to implement orienteering in a fun and educational way and and to get more new countries to take part in orienteering.

Visionary course of action

Each club of all national Orienteering Federations gets in touch with at least one school.  As teachers might need help to implement orienteering so the lessons are a fun and exciting experience, the IOF is working on providing teaching materials in different languages. 


Find out more here.

 

#worldorienteeringday

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Tweet Wednesday 12th July 2017

Sasha Chepelin On The Podium At JWOC!

In the men's sprint today, Sasha Chepelin ran a great race, from a late start, to finish in 5th, 17 seconds behind the eventual winner, Olli Ojanaho (Finland) and just 7 seconds behind bronze placed, Joey Hadorn (Switzerland).

The course was technical, with many intricate route choice legs that provided a challenge for the athletes. Sasha said "A steady and secure race overall, but with a few small misses which cost me a really nice result, but the podium is already well beyond what I was hoping for at the sprint race. I really didn't put much effort into geeking nor hours into training for the discipline. In the end, it was a case of planning ahead and taking the foot off the gas frequently, and I think that suited many forest specialists very well, including me!"

Sasha on the podium

Alex Carcas and Ali Masson were within one second of each other, finishing 24th and 25th respectively. Both said they had good runs, but they both saw places afterwards where they could have saved time. Harrison McCartney finished in 80th, with only two and a half minutes separating the top 100.

In the girl's sprint race, Cecilie Anderson ran a strong race against a very competitive field to finish in 20th, +1:26 on the time of the eventual winner, Simona Aebersold (Switzerland). Alice Rigby followed in 27th after a solid and stable race. Finally, Chloe Potter ran into 52nd place.

The complexity of the course and high density of the controls made mistakes very easy to make. Unfortunately, due to this, Fiona Bunn, still recovering from illness, and Nathan Lawson saw missed punches, but no doubt they will be looking to bounce back strongly later in the week.

Alex Carcas

Full results can be found here. The athletes are having a deserved rest day with the long race next on Friday.
Credit - Aidan Rigby

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