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Share  Tweet Tuesday 30th November 2021

Active Cumbria Rising Star Awarded to Ruben Razzetti (Border Liners OC)

Active Cumbria Sports Awards Announced

The RISING STAR AWARD has been awarded to RUBEN RAZZETTI member of the Border Liners Orienteering Club.

Ruben Razzetti (Border Liners Orienteering Club)

The announcement has been made on the Active Cumbria Facebook page

Ruben is making great strides in the world of Orienteering. A Border Liners Club member, he has won numerous races during the year across all parts of Cumbria. He was also selected to attend a 3-day Badaguish summer training camp by his Governing Body, as well as being selected to join the GB Talent North Squad.

Congratulations Ruben!

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British Orienteering is interested to hear of any other awards clubs and their members have received in recognition.  Email: info@britishorienteering.org.uk

 

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Share  Tweet Tuesday 30th November 2021

285 runners enjoyed a long-awaited and awesome British Nights Orienteering Championships

Report by Pat Macleod, British Nights Orienteering Championships Organiser

Sadly the 2021 British Night Champions will only get to keep their trophies for a few months, but after much frustration and Covid induced delay, not even storm Arwen managed to stop us finally staging what proved, I think, to most people, a thoroughly challenging but enjoyable event.  I did wonder as I drove up from a snow-free Forest of Dean whether we'd get away with it when I saw snow blanketed Cleeve Hill, but with the help of the Cleeve Common Ranger, the golf club, the Cotswold Way cafe, and of course an army of willing helpers, get away with it we did.

Setting up the Start

Some observations:

  • We had 315 pre-entries, perhaps a little over the average for the British Nights, and 285 runners, so a somewhat higher than average drop-out rate, probably due to the weather; very few Covid related refunds.
  • We printed just over 200 food vouchers, not all taken up of course, but suggesting that pre-ordering food, which I thought many would not be keen to do, was in fact quite popular.
  • Not so much a numerical statistic, more just an eye-opener, but an eye-watering one.  Spatially, 300m and 6 contours separated the area outside the golf club from the start; Meteorologically, one was normal UK autumn, the other arctic temperature, and windchill. The change was halfway up, very sudden, and quite startling.  
  • Winning times were largely within spec, so the weather clearly didn't interfere with the orienteering; in fact, many commented on how wonderful it was to run at night in the snow, and what was also commented on as an outstanding map.
  • The start seemed to work well with its 'virtual' tents but decent lighting. We couldn't get the tents up, so just used the frames to support the lighting.
  • Having a warm and snug golf club for post-run analysis, drinks, and prizegiving was a huge benefit, and great credit must go to the club, which changed hands during the gestation period for this event, the bar manager and his wife only starting work on 1st November.  The new owners nevertheless honoured in full every arrangement we had made with the previous owners.

Some lessons:

  • The very early starts were a little chaotic, for which we apologise to those runners affected; the lack of shelter meant that we decided not to put maps and control descriptions out until the last minute, but whilst the map boxes had all been taped down, the CDs, although glued and hung on secure pegs, just started blowing away one by one.  Put in bags, the whole bag blew away.  So we resorted to handing them out, and some course 1 runners regrettably had to go without until we retrieved the bag from the bushes down gale.
  • We had one control fail early in the event, but most people used the backup punch.  Some didn't, but in the interests of the event as a whole, we decided to remove that control from the affected courses.  Backup punches may be '1980s' technology, as one comment was made, but they always work – can't be said for even the latest technology.
  • Despite a request in the final details, and a fair amount of detailed information on the start procedure, most runners neither displayed their bibs over their waterproof nor knew which lane they were supposed to be in.  So it took extra work to make sure people got into the right lane for their maps.  Many people seem very blasé about final details, even brash in claiming that they never read them. They are there to make life easier for runners and helpers alike, and if everyone did what they were asked, complex processes like a timed start in the Arctic would run much more smoothly.
  • We were very lucky with parking.   We knew we would struggle, but had a plan B.  The problem was that snow largely invalidated plan B, and we had no plan C.  We should have had, and it's hugely to the credit of the parking team that we didn't in the end need a plan C.
  • Parking for campers and camper vans was part of plan B and barely worked.  We apologise to those who paid for camping pitches but weren't able to use them, though I think we did accommodate everyone in the end.

Last comment from the Organiser; the volunteer team was outstanding.  We had two ladies, both on the start, neither of them club members, one an occasional orienteer and maprunner, the other newly moved into our patch from Northern Ireland, yet to join us, who along with all the other start team people stood cheerfully steering runners through the process, then stripped down the start and carried it all back down the hill to the van. Never a complaint, always a smile, always a willing hand to do whatever was asked of them.  North Gloucestershire Orienteering Club (NGOC) may not be a high-profile club in the orienteering rankings, but we have as good a bunch of volunteers as you could find anywhere, and in the end, all credit for the success of BNOC 2021 belongs to them.


Finally, feedback from runners has been all positive.

"A memorable and well-organised event."
"Thanks for a wonderful event on Saturday night!"
"I am impressed the event still went ahead in those conditions.  It was an incredible experience to run around in the snow and the dark.  Definitely, one that will be remembered!"
"What a super treat last night was!  It was awesome. I was really buzzing at the finish. Job very well done to you and the team."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Virtual Start Tent
Organisers on the night
Snowy conditions
M/W 21 Winners

Photo credits:  North Gloucestershire Orienteering Club

British Orienteering would like to thank Pat Macleod, British Nights Orienteering Championships Organiser, and all members of North Gloucestershire Orienteering Club for your hard work and determination in making this night event finally happen.  Some very challenging conditions and as one competitor comments "definitely an awesome event to remember"

Congratulations to all British Orienteering Night Champions crowned in their individual age categories.

Preliminary results are available here

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Save the date!
Plans for the British Orienteering Night Championships 2022 are already well underway.  The event is to be held on Ilkley Moor and is being hosted by Airienteers (AIRE) on 19 February 2022, it is followed the next day by a National Event and UK Orienteering League (UKOL) on Burley and Ilkley Moor. Entries are due to open very soon.

To find out more details are available here.

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Important to please note:  Renew your membership in plenty of time to ensure that you take advantage of the early closing date fees for the Major Events taking place in the early part of 2022.

 

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Share  Tweet Thursday 25th November 2021

This weekend is the penultimate race of the UK Orienteering League season

Update by Martin Ward, British Orienteering UKOL Coordinator.

This weekend sees North Gloucester (NGOC) hosting the British Night Orienteering Championships at Cleeve Hill.  This is race 15 in the 2021 season, and with a total of eight scores to count in the league, it will be decisive in some age categories in determining who comes out as the UK Orienteering League champion.

The terrain at Cleeve Hill is described by the planner as "mainly open, runnable grassland, with steep crags on its Western escarpment, together with areas of scattered gorse, and complex old quarry workings".  The longest course for M21 competitors has over 11km and 400m of climbing, but could still be won in around 60-65 minutes.  Across all the age categories over 300 people will compete.

In the UK Orienteering League (UKOL) Club Competition, Bristol (BOK) has now taken a lead on 4,508 points, ahead of South Yorkshire (SYO) on 4,381 and Forth Valley (FVO) on 4,156.  With the final two UKOL races being in the south of the UK, those look set to remain the final club league positions unless there is an unexpected turnaround.

There is currently just one competitor with the "perfect score" of 400 points for eight wins - well done Kirsten Strain (W35, AROS)! In the M85 category, John Thompson of TVOC has 399 points, so just one more win for John would see him match Kirsten's score.

The final UKOL race of the season is also fast approaching and will be hosted by Mole Valley (MVOC) on South Ashdown on 12 December.  It's also the Southern Championships, so should see a high level of entries.

As we reach the end of the 2021 season, which was shortened due to a late start caused by Covid, I'd like to thank all the clubs and volunteers that have supported the UK Orienteering League by hosting the events at which the races have been held.

The 2022 UKOL season races will be confirmed and published very soon.

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Share  Tweet Wednesday 6th May 2020

British Orienteering Awards 2019

Over the next week, British Orienteering are pleased to announce the winners of the both the Mapping and Volunteer Awards for 2019.

Today we start with the winner for The Chichester Trophy in mapping.

The map awards for maps used in 2019 are decided on submissions provided by clubs and mappers. The judges were Ray Barnes, Brian Bullen and Susan Marsden with the scoring is based on specification, cartography and presentation.

The Chichester Trophy is presented for the best map by an amateur mapper.

The three judges agreed that the winning map is:

Arncliffe & Kilnsey North by Tony Thornley (Airienteers).

On hearing about his award Tony said: 

"I am delighted to have been awarded the Chichester Trophy for my map for last year’s British Champs. The trophy is very special; it is the binnacle compass from the yacht Gipsy Moth V. Sir Francis presented it to British Orienteering when he was president in 1971, shortly before he died. Along with the British Orienteering Championships M21E ‘King of the Forest’ trophy it is probably the most iconic and special of all British Orienteering awards.

As well as making the first single-handed circumnavigation of the world, Sir Francis was a navigator and map maker so the Chichester Trophy represents a cartographic tradition. My orienteering mapping goes back almost 50 years, through pen and ink, via scribing, to computer cartography. I very much hope that others will continue to carry this tradition forwards over the next 50 years.

A big thank you to many friends who have helped me develop my mapping skills, and to those who made last year’s British Orienteering CHampionships a success, and to my wife Jo for tolerating endless orienteering projects. I hope we can get back to making and using maps soon."

Tony Thornley (Airienteers)

Terry Smith Acting Chair Map Advisory Group, says:  

“The stated aim of the Mapping Awards is to encourage and recognise high standards of mapping. Some opportunities for improvement that the judges identified include adhering to the British Orienteering Rules for mapping and using the British Orienteering symbol sets, improving generalisation and getting the scale correct.”

“The judges found it exceedingly difficult to differentiate between many of the maps submitted for several of the trophies. All those who submitted maps should be immensely proud of their achievements.”

“The judges would like to send their appreciation and congratulations to all entries for the high standard this year.”

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