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World Orienteering Day World Orienteering Day
Wednesday 11th May 2016

Check out the website!   www.worldorienteeringday.com

Wednesday 11th May 2016

Check out the website!   www.worldorienteeringday.com

Get your school involved in World Orienteering Day with XPLORER Schools.

Xplorer Schools

The new cross curricular resource from British Orienteering.

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Welcome to British Orienteering

Orienteering is an exciting and challenging outdoor sport that exercises both mind and body. The aim is to navigate between control points marked on an orienteering map; as a competitive sport the challenge is to complete the course in the quickest time choosing your own best route; as a recreational activity it does not matter how young, old or fit you are, as you can run or walk making progress at your own pace on the courses planned to suit you.

Orienteering can take place anywhere from remote forest and countryside to urban areas, parks and school playgrounds. Orienteering is a fulfilling sport for runners and walkers of all ages who want to test themselves mentally as well as physically or who want to add variety to their leisure activities. Read More

 

British Orienteering Championships 2016 Results and Report

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New British Long Distance and Relay Champions!

The new British Orienteering Long Distance Champions are:

Men’s Elite Results
1st       Graham Gristwood (Forth Valley OC) in 86:47 minutes
2nd      Ben Mitchell (Swansea Bay OC) in 101:54 minutes
3rd       Richard Robinson (Nottinghamshire OC) in 102:41 minutes

Women’s Elite Results
1st       Kim Baxter (South Yorkshire OC) in 78:03 minutes
2nd      Sarah Rollins (Southern Navigators OC) in 82:35 minutes
3rd       Clare Dallimore (South Wales OC) 85:09 minutes

The new British Orienteering Relay Champions are:

Men’s Elite Results

1st

Will Rigg/Tim Morgan/Alexander Chepelin
(Edinburgh University OC)

106:29 mins

2nd

Matthew Elkington/Oliver Williams/Dane Blomquist
(Sheffield University OC)

106:49 mins

3rd

Will Hensman/Mark Nixon/Graham Gristwood
(Forth Valley OC)

109:49 mins

 

Women’s Elite Results

1st

Rebecca Harding/Heather Roome/Rebecca Rooke
(South Ribble OC)

111:19 mins

2nd

Grace Molloy/Clare Stansfield/Janine Inman
(Forth Valley OC)

120:03 mins

3rd

Beth Hanson/Jenny Ricketts/Sarah Jones
(Edinburgh University OC)

121:05 mins

 

The British Orienteering Championships 2016 took place on Saturday (30 April) with the first race being the Long distance and the second day the Sunday (1 May) with the Relay.  Within the stunning scenery of Brown Clee in Shropshire this event attracted the UK’s top orienteers.

British Orienteering and West Midlands Orienteering Association organised the event with the help of a number of volunteers.

You can see the full results from the weekend at the official British Championships website:  www.theboc.org.uk/page/Results_reports_photos


On a cool spring Saturday in Shropshire Graham Gristwood of Forth Valley and Kim Baxter of South Yorkshire were crowned as the 2016 British elite long-distance orienteering champions. Brown Clee Hill offered competitors both panoramic views and a variety of challenging terrain, with particularly tricky navigation and tough running through the vague, heather-clad contours of the open moorland.

Despite a couple of small mistakes, nobody else was able to match Gristwood for pace over 14km of steep and physical terrain, and he took his third consecutive British elite long title by a comfortable margin of over fifteen minutes. Gristwood said:

“Although most of the competition were in Poland (World Cup Round 1) this weekend, I approached the race like any other – I wanted to do a good performance physically and technically. With the conditions as they were at the JK, this was my only chance to do a long distance race before the European Championships, so there were no thoughts of ‘taking it easy’.

My race was generally very good, I paced it well and felt like I was running strongly all the way around. I had trouble at a couple of controls – one due to the VERY recent felling, but in one area I really struggled to understand the map.

Having said that, in general the terrain and course were suitably challenging physically and technically and I really enjoyed my race. I am very happy to win the King of the Forest title again, and I look forward to defending my title (hopefully against a stronger start field) at High Dam next year!”


                                                                                                Photo credit: Robert Lines

The battle for the other medals in the men’s elite race was rather closer, with Ben Mitchell of Swansea Bay taking silver – his first senior medal – thanks to a steady run without any major time losses. Nottinghamshire’s Richard Robinson was third, losing time early on but then navigating smoothly when others made errors through the latter part of the course to finish only 47 seconds behind Mitchell.

In the women’s elite race an excellent run from veteran Baxter secured the trophy, twelve years since she won her only previous British elite title in the 2004 sprint championship at Ulpha Fell. Running with no major mistakes, Baxter finished over four minutes ahead of two-time British elite long champion Sarah Rollins of Southern Navigators, who lost time on the open moorland in the first half of the course.

Clare Dallimore of South Wales finished third to take her first senior medal, seven minutes behind Baxter but well ahead of her nearest rivals.


                           Photo credit: Robert Lines                                                                                                         Photo credit: Robert Lines

Sunday’s relays had been widely acknowledged as difficult to predict, with the 2015 champions in both the men’s and women’s premier classes opting not to defend their titles. The area of Brown Clee used for the relays offered more runnable terrain than for the individual race, with areas of lightning-fast open parkland. In the event two clubs were able to put their names on trophies for the first time, with Edinburgh University winning a close men’s race while South Ribble took the women’s title by a more comfortable margin.

In the men’s relay Alexander Chepelin had a stunning run on the last lap for Edinburgh to overhaul a ninety-second deficit on their old rivals from Sheffield University, with the team of Chepelin, Will Rigg and Tim Morgan ultimately clinching the title by a mere twenty seconds. Dane Blomquist brought Sheffield home in second, while Graham Gristwood secured bronze for Forth Valley a further three minutes down.
                                                                                                Photo Credit: Robert Lines

An excellent second-lap run from Heather Roome opened up a commanding lead of almost five minutes for South Ribble in the women’s race, which Rebecca Rooke further extended on the final lap to secure the title for the team of herself, Roome, and Rebecca Harding. Rooke brought South Ribble home with a comfortable eight-minute lead over Forth Valley’s Janine Inman in second. Sarah Jones caught over four minutes on Inman on the last lap to bring Edinburgh University home only a minute further down in bronze-medal position.


                                                                                                Photo Credit: Robert Lines

For more information about orienteering visit the British Orienteering official website: www.britishorienteering.org.uk
 

Article written by Scott Collier, item published by Scott Parker, Administrator.

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World Cup Sprint Relay

The final race in the first set of World Cups was held yesterday in Wroclaw Poland, writes Liz Campbell. Great Britain had 13 athletes, three full teams and Kirstin Maxwell running fourth leg for a mixed nation team. There was lots of nervous anticipation as 140 of the world’s best athletes warmed up on the quarantine 400m track - it was always going to be an exciting race!

Jess Tullie, on first leg, found the 18 minutes from call up to the start stressful.  During the 750m to jog to the arena, the athletes were watching each other whilst wondering where they were going and what it would be like.  There was limited space to 'do your own thing' and, for Jess, 'the minutes felt like hours' to be contrasted by the fast and furious racing that 'went by in a blur'.

Trzebnica is a small town with cobbled streets and small areas of parkland. The courses were well planned with most of the route choices giving good spectator viewing as runners split and came back together again.  Several controls were placed at the top of short sharp slopes needing a powerful effort with little time to recover and the run through was an uphill cobbled street which Dave Schorah renamed ‘the tourmalet’ after one of the classic cols in the French Pyrenees.

                                                         

 

The team was disappointed with the end results with several people making errors and despite some strong performances no single GB team achieved four good runs.  All athletes have positives to take from this weekend and will now go home and reflect in detail on their races and tweak their plans for the rest of the season. 

Whilst we should, and will, celebrate our strong performances this weekend we are only too well aware that, as a team, we have had far too many athletes falling foul of basic errors. Our athletes are fitter than they have been before and we now plan to  increase the intensity of technical training so that they can confidently deliver the performances that they are capable of at the big international races.  

 
Full results can be found here.
 
Item posted by Jackie Newton, Talent and Performance Manager.

 

 

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World Cup Sprint

Yesterday was the second race of the 2016 World Cup, a Sprint race in Wroclaw writes Cat Taylor. The Qualification (morning) and Final (afternoon) courses took in a variety of terrain, with the Final held in tricky old university buildings, with an arena start and two "laps" of the area (using a map exchange). This meant that the race was exciting to watch as well as being very challenging, testing runners' speed, agility and quick route choice decisions. 

Once again it was Ralph Street who came away with the best performance of the British men, running two more solid races to secure 12th position in the final.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ralph was joined in the A Final by Peter Hodkinson, who described his race as "a good experience and some things to improve, though I'm not disappointed with my performance."

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Hollie Orr qualified strongly for the women's A Final but says the afternoon's difficult course "illustrated my recent focus away from sprint technique - there's no getting away with mistakes at this level!"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Meanwhile, Jo Shepherd recovered excellently from one mistake in the morning's qualification race - which cost her a place in the A final - to have a great run in the afternoon, the fastest woman in the "B" final. Jo was pleased to have "good control" on the technical course.

Though the day provided something of a mixed bag of experiences, the team's consensus was that the competition was really well organised, with great courses and as Will Gardner commented, "it was brilliant to have such loud team support in the arena". The World Cup weekend concludes today with a Sprint relay and GBR have three full teams and one mixed nation team. It promises to be an exciting race and a chance for the athletes to either build on today's performance or make a new start.

 
Full results of the final can be found here.
 
Item posted by Jackie Newton, Talent and Performance manager.

 

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World Cup Middle

The international orienteering season has started! The World Cup kicked off today at Sleza, Poland, writes Cat Taylor.

 

 The forest offered a "heaven and hell" contrast between open, fast woodland, rockier underfoot conditions and many areas of thicker, tougher vegetation. The courses challenged runners with plenty of direction and terrain changes and many runners were caught out, not adapting quickly enough to each change.

 

In terms of results, the best British position was Hollie Orr in 18th. Neither Hollie or Jess Tullie (40th) (pictured) had quite the day they wanted but both found lots of positives and potential to take going into the European Championships at the end of this month, which will be held just over the border, in the Czech Republic. Jo Shepherd put in a very credible performance in 26th spot.
 
In the tightly packed men's race, Ralph Street ran to 25th place. Ralph says, "I ran a stable race, not brilliant but controlled and a solid start to the year," adding that the day as a whole had been enjoyable.
 
For Kirsten Strain (72nd), this was a World Cup debut and a great chance to learn what racing at this level involves. Kirsten comments that, "my main aim was to gain experience and I certainly did that. It's clear there's a lot to learn but it was a great introduction to the World Cup."
 
Meanwhile in nearby Wroclaw, athletes opening their World Cup with tomorrow's Sprint race had a more relaxed day of training, rest and preparation. The team are reloading for the early start tomorrow to qualify for the evening's final race. Good luck to all the Brits fighting it out for those places in the final!
 
Full results can be found here.
 
Item posted by Jackie Newton, Talent and Performance manager.
 
 
 

 

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BOC Long Championships

British Orienteering Championships – Long Distance Results (UKOL)
Saturday 30th April 2016

Congratulations to everyone who took part. 

You can see the full results from the weekend at the official British Championships website:  http://www.theboc.org.uk/page/Results_reports_photos

Results for Class Men 21 Elite
1st       Graham Gristwood (FVO)                     86:47
2nd      Ben Mitchell (SBOC)                            101:54
3rd       Richard Robinson (NOC)                    102:41

 

Results for Class Women 21 Elite
1st       Kim Baxter (SYO)                                  78:03
2nd      Sarah Rollins (SN)                                82:35
3rd       Clare Dallimore (SWOC)                     85:09

 

Thank you to the West Midlands Orienteering Association and all the volunteers for putting on a fantastic event in Shropshire.  You can see the full results from the weekend at the official British Championships website:  www.theboc.org.uk/page/Results_reports_photos and at http://siresults.co.uk/2016/boc/individual/index.html

 

 

Item posted by Jennie Taylor, Marketing Manager

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The British team have arrived in Wroclaw for 2016 World Cup Round 1

The British team have arrived in Wroclaw, southern Poland, for the first World Cup races of the year writes Cat Taylor.

 

S​pring has also arrived and the sun has certainly helped the athletes enjoy their preparation. The team members have varying amounts of international experience, and therefore an exciting range of aims for the weekend in terms of performance and learning. Spirits are high and all are looking forward to competing.

 

 

 

Wroclaw itself is flat but tomorrow's Middle race will be held on the slopes of the nearby Sleza ski area. The terrain features mixed forest and an extensive track network typical of central Europe, with some rockier areas, and isn't always as straightforward as suggested by a first glance at the map. The athletes competing in the Middle have taken 1-2 trips to the map adjacent to the competition area to get acquainted with the challenges they'll face. Hector Haines commented that the forest can seem a bit rough at first but is, "quite nice once you've tried it a second time."

 

 

 

 

Both Sunday's Sprint (Qualification and Final) and Monday's Sprint Relay will be in the city, much flatter but nevertheless offering many different types of terrain. City parks, rougher open riverbanks, campus buildings with tricky gardens and housing areas will all feature, meaning that athletes' ability to adapt running speed to the intensity of the orienteering will be key. The sprint team report that the final area "looks really fun! Different to anything you'd find in the UK. It will be a great experience."

 

You can follow the action and cheer on the British athletes from home! The Middle distance starts at 9:00 UK time and you can find links to live results, tracking and TV at worldcup2016.pl

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British Orienteering Championships 2016 - this weekend!

The British Orienteering Championships takes place this weekend (Saturday 30 April and Sunday 1st May) in Shropshire. 

This event has been organised by British Orienteering and West Midlands Orienteering Association and forms part of the UK Orienteering League. More information about the event can be found www.theboc.org.uk

British Orienteering wishes all competitors a successful and very enjoyable weekend.

 

 

Item posted by Jennie Taylor, Marketing Manager.

 

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World Cup 2016 Round 1

World Cup 2016 Round 1
Saturday 30 April – Monday 2 May 2016


Good luck and best wishes to all GB athletes selected to compete in the World Cup 2016 Round 1 in Wroclaw, Poland this weekend. 

From British Orienteering and all their members.
 

Item posted by Jennie Taylor, Marketing Manager.

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British Orienteering Championships 2016

                    

On Saturday 30 April people from all over the country are set to navigate their way to an exciting weekend of orienteering in Shropshire. British Orienteering and West Midlands Orienteering Association will be holding the British Orienteering Championships over two days on Brown Clee in the rural English county of Shropshire.  Brown Clee is in the Shropshire Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, making this a perfect setting for all to enjoy.

Orienteering is an outdoor sport whose aim is to navigate in sequence between control points using a map and compass, deciding on the best route to complete the course in the quickest time. It does not matter how young, old or fit you are because, as competition is divided into age classes, orienteering is for everyone.  Brown Clee is an ideal venue for orienteering as it comprises an elongated hill with two summits covered by woodland of varying age, runnability and complexity, plantations, rough open, marshy areas and exposed moorland.  There are well defined networks of paths, rides and tracks in some areas while mining on the two summits, old earthworks, pits, spoil heaps and parallel stream valleys and re-entrants have left tricky contour detail.

The Championships will feature the Long Distance event on Saturday (30 April) and is hoped to attract the UK’s top orienteers as they aim to compete to become the 2016 British Champion.  Sunday 1 May will see the Relay Championships taking place with reams of top orienteers vying to take home the trophies.

Sally Pygott from British Orienteering said, “We welcome spectators at the event and we will be providing taster courses, a Maze course and Xplorer activity over the weekend so that local people can try the sport for themselves. As a beginner you need no navigation experience and we have courses to suit all fitness levels. We encourage all to come and enjoy in the fun.”

Plase note: We regret that dogs are not allowed anywhere on the estate, including the car park.

For further information about the event please visit the event website.

For further information about the sport of orienteering please visit the British Orienteering website.

 

Item posted by Jennie Taylor, Marketing Manager.

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Overwhelming success for World Orienteering Day

Orienteering will be in every corner of the world on 11th of May. World Orienteering Day is an event to unite the whole world of orienteering. The project has gathered huge interest from all over the world, and right now there are now 873 locations, in 60 countries, already registered.

Notable among the registered locations, which are spread over all continents, are events in exciting places such as Greenland and New Caledonia.

The events will take place in cities, parks, forests and in school yards. Most of the participants will be youths and school children, but people of all ages are encouraged to take part.

There are many ways to practice orienteering, as indicated by the four main disciplines governed by the IOF, namely Foot Orienteering, Ski Orienteering, Mountain Bike Orienteering and Trail Orienteering. Creative ways of organising such events include night orienteering, using headlamps or flashlights, and indoor orienteering, using artificial landscapes of obstacles.
 

Support from the International Olympic Committee

It is not only schoolchildren who have seen the potential of this event. The International Orienteering Federation recently received a letter from the International Olympic Committee President Thomas Bach himself, in support of the first ever World Orienteering Day. In it, he highlights the importance of inspiring young people with the values of sport, and also notes that the activities of World Orienteering Day are well aligned with the key objective of Olympic Agenda 2020: engaging youth through sport. To read the letter in full please click here.

Brian Porteous, President of the International Orienteering Federation, says:
“Not only is this important considering the Olympic ambitions of orienteering, but it also underlines the importance of the sport in inspiring a younger generation to embrace the values of sport that orienteering represents.”

More locations and countries are being registered every day on the digital map here: www.worldorienteeringday.com

For more information and press photos, please contact malin.bjorkqvist@orienteering.org

 

Item uploaded by Jennie Taylor, Marketing Manager on behalf of the International Orienteering Federation

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News Headlines

3
May

World Cup Sprint Relay

The final race in the first set of World Cups was held yesterday in Wroclaw Poland.
2
May

World Cup Sprint

Solid performances for GBR at yesterday's World Cup Sprint

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